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After plenty of scares and obstacles to overcome, James gets round the Ronde.

After all of the trials and tribulations of getting to the start line, the RVV Cyclo threw up some more last minute challenges before being conquered.

After arriving on Friday, the Wife and I headed to Oudenaarde to sign on. The temperature gauge on the car showed no signs of getting into double figures and then the rain started...

Bizarrely you get given your medal when you sign on, but for superstitious reasons I gave it to my wife and wouldn’t touch it until I had earned it.

We headed off the Bruges in high spirits and enjoyed an evening in the town square with a couple of relaxing drinks. Other participants in the event  assured us the weather would be fine come Saturday.

They couldn’t have been more incorrect.

The rain was unrelenting as was the fog and extreme cold. I had packed limited contingency clothes based on the 10 degree forecast and ended up wearing everything I had taken along!

My good friend (also confusingly called James) and I rode the couple of miles from our position in the Johan Museeuw car park to the ceremonial start at the Qubus Centre. The rain was falling heavily now and we rumbled under the air bridge and towards the start proper with a good degree of trepidation.

The first few miles were along a cycle way before crossing a bridge and traversing the timing mat. We were in a group of about 400 at this time and were huddling together for warmth.  We rolled out of town into the country side and all seemed serene and calm... for about 5 miles.

Nothing can prepare you for hitting your first set of Belgian pave. Nothing. Since the weekend people have been asking me how it felt and the only analogy I can give to cover it is this.

“It’s like riding a jackhammer up the steepest flight of stairs you can find whilst someone throws freezing cold water in your face.”

I had pins and needles in my fingers before the end of the first sector and made a mental note to grip the bars less tightly as we moved forward.

We had a chat (James and I ) about an hour and a half in and were amazed to have barely covered 20 miles. It was soul destroying.

The weather wasn’t improving and we were passing groups of riders huddled for warmth in bus shelters and had seen a couple of accidents.

After the feed we headed to the first of the big three. All was going so well on the Koppenberg until two people locked handlebars in front of us and fell. We had nowhere to go and whilst they stood arguing in the road we were on foot and getting round them.

The cobbles were rock hard, super steep and covered in thick sticky mud which I can still taste in my mouth.

It was nigh on impossible to remount so we took a cleat destroying run up the last part before leaping back on and flying down the other side.

We were going ok though. Not as fast as we had wanted, but we were passing swathes of riders and as we ticked off Molenberg, Berendries and so on we started to settle in.

My arms were tiring badly and my ribs starting to get sore from the pounding, but on we went past plenty of abandons and lots of riders who had long since given up on a quick time.

After a couple of stupidly steep road climbs we went through the last feed. My Wife was at her final vantage point on the course before driving back to the finish and we started to get over some mid ride doubts about finishing.

But then we hit the Oude Kwaremont.  For the first time we were properly separated. And then someone in the gap fell and I was off again. “I am not giving up on this climb” was the thought I had and once the gradient eased slightly I jumped on and wheel span to get some grip and get going again.

The crowds were three or four deep, it was incredible. The noise, the atmosphere, the encouragement. The pain and gradient melted away and the pounding of the cobbles actually became tolerable.

I had one more scare before the top when a guy from the right side of the road just physically gave up and shot across me to the left before disappearing off the side of the road.

I got back to the main road and James and I got back together.

“One to go”, we said to each other.

The Paterberg was the hardest climb though, and we freewheeled down to it to try and preserve the small amount of strength we had left.

I wanted a strong finish. But in a bizarre mirror of the pro race the following day I got knocked off the road by an officials car.

To be fair there were hundreds of riders going up the single track but his attempts to overtake weren’t the best. He stalled and rolled back to the group we were in. James baled left and got round before falling. I managed to bail out and started to run.

It was frustrating and I was really angry. I was doing this event to inspire my Mum for her battle with Chemotherapy. What sort of an example was I setting her by walking? But my chimp got put away and the enormity of what had been achieved against the odds of her illness, the weather and terrain helped me overcome that.

James and I spent the last few km’s back into Oudenaarde discussing what we had done. It hadn’t sunk in then and is only just sinking in now.

We rode through the finish and I don’t mind admitting I was in floods of tears.

It was an incredible day and being in Bruges for the start the following morning and understanding what the riders were about to go through was a great way to enhance the experience.

There were times during the event on the slippy, wet cobbles that I didn’t think I would finish. We also said it was the sort of day we would only appreciate when it was over.

Having said all of that I can thoroughly recommend it. Easily the best sportive I have ridden.

Back to the medal I wouldn’t touch until I had earned it... I have barely taken it off since I got it !

James has been blogging for road.cc for 5 years and racing bicycles (averagely) for 20 years. 

10 comments

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mrpt5 [63 posts] 4 years ago
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Great ride, great read - you've not persuaded me to enter though. Trevor, SNCC.

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Acer2013 [1 post] 4 years ago
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A great ride in difficult conditions, pity couldn't ride up the big climb fully due to traffic and slippery cobbles. Wouldn't wanted to have ridden it with anyone else though, great experience jimmythecuckoo!!

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Jimbomitch [172 posts] 4 years ago
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Chapeau

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DominicC [5 posts] 4 years ago
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Well done mate. Your ride sounds like an epic achievement. I didnt get round my Roubaix ride the week before because of the weather, so it is great to hear of your achievements in completing this. Especially when there were many occasions when giving up must have looked reasonable. (many others did!).
Good luck to all in your family in dealing with your mother's illness.

You have known fortitude.

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S13SFC [161 posts] 4 years ago
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I rode it as well and the word "epic" sums it up for me.

My experiences are similar to yours. I had the climbs of Koppenberg, Oude Kwaremont & Paterberg ruined by crashes right in front of me, the one on the Koppenberg bringing me down, so I and a friend are going back late next month to ride them away from the crowds & in the dry.

I asked a Belgian chap if there was a secret for riding the pave. He simply smiled and said "No, you must simply suffer it". Summed it up nicely. The slight downhills of the pave had be thinking of my own mortality!

The last 10km back to Oudenaarde into the headwind was bloody brilliant as we rode through & off with a group of locals making the run into the finish feel like the real deal.

Would I do it again? No, there are other rides to be ridden.

Am I glad I did it? Definitely and I'm also glad the weather was as it was, it made it "proper Flanders".

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James Warrener [1086 posts] 4 years ago
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I agree with that  1 feels good to have done it and in bad conditions. But now we move on.

Having said that I would love to go back for the weekend again as a spectator for both events.

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Sean Kelly [17 posts] 4 years ago
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If you do the long route, by the time you get to those cobbled climbs the traffic is much thinner and therefore a lot more enjoyable. My friends did the middle length route and it was carnage.

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ChuckB [44 posts] 4 years ago
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Chapeau to you and all who did this (me included), hope your trip helps your mom a bit. Never thought I would ever say this, but I look forward to the "calm" of Saturday's Paris Roubaix sportive.

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BFG on a Bike [3 posts] 4 years ago
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Sounds epic in all sorts of ways - the climbs are always easier without the chimp hanging on as well!

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mrchrispy [516 posts] 4 years ago
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I need to drum up some support for this next year.
its on my riding list