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Monitors for phone and handlebars

With all the attention given to power meters in recent years, you’d be forgiven for thinking that heart rate monitors have vanished. Not so, and they’re still a useful training aid.

A heart rate monitor, as the name suggests, measures your heart rate in beats per minute and displays it on a screen. As you’ve no doubt noticed, the harder you ride, the faster your heart beats, so heart rate is a useful proxy for your effort level.

You can therefore use a heart rate monitor as a training aid, setting target heart rate ranges for training sessions. Some monitors record your heart rate every second for later examination and may also estimate the Calories you’ve burned, useful if one of your cycling aims is to lose weight.

Heart rate’s not a perfect measure of riding effort though. It can be affected by the time of day, caffeinated beverages, the weather and how tired you are. But with that in mind, it’s still useful, and a heart rate monitor costs a lot less than even the cheapest of the new wave of power meters. The more sophisticated units will work with a power meter too, so you can upgrade to training with power later if you get more serious.

Types of heart rate monitors

Most sport-orientated heart rate monitors work the same way: a sensor band round your chest detects the heart's electrical activity and transmits pulses to a device with a screen that does the spade work of calculating and recording your heart rate. It's the same principle as a hospital electrocardiography (ECG) machine. In the last few years wrist-mounted fitness trackers have appeared that shine a bright LED into your skin and detect your pulse by the change in the reflected light as blood fills and drains from the capillaries, a process called photoplethysmography. This isn't as accurate as ECG.

The device proving theread-out could be a watch or a handlebar-mounted computer or GPS unit. It might also be your mobile phone; many heart rate monitor bands now use low-power Bluetooth Smart that will communicate directly with a phone, or you can add an ANT+ dongle to your phone to work with a compatible band.

At the cheaper end of the price range are standalone heart rate monitors, almost always built into a watch. They’re easy to use and if you do more than one sport they’re the most versatile way of measuring heart rate. The more you spend the more features you get and the more the device or its associated applications will do for you, including working out your heart rate zones and warning you if you’re going too hard or too easy on a given session.

Cycling-specific heart rate monitors roll the function into a computer or, if you’re spending a bit more, a GPS unit. More advanced (that is, expensive) units log your ride and heart rate data so you can see how much time you spent in each of your heart rate zones and compare segments from one ride to another to measure your progress. For example, if you’re faster up that hill for the same heart rate, then your fitness has improved.

All of this means you have a huge range of choice in devices that display and record your heart rate, to the point where the importance of this function has been over-shadowed by all the excitement about GPS-enabled exploring and bagging Strava segments. Nevertheless, if you’re aiming to get fitter, it's the core function you want whether you’re spending £30 or £300.

Geonaute Cardio ANT+/Bluetooth Smart — £29.99

GEONAUTE ANT+:BLUETOOTH SMART HRM.jpg

GEONAUTE ANT+:BLUETOOTH SMART HRM.jpg

If you have an iPhone or Android 4.3 device, this Bluetooth Smart heart rate strap will pair with it, so you can add heart rate data to your Strava logs. It has ANT+ capability too, so you can add heart rate measurement if you have a compatible bike computer or GPS unit.

Find a Geonaute dealer

Polar FT1 — £29.99 (in-store only)

Polar FT1.jpg

Polar FT1.jpg

Polar is the daddy of heart rate monitor makers with a solid reputation for accuracy and reliability. This basic wrist-mounted unit tells you your heart rate as you ride (or run, if you’re so inclined) and can sound alarms if you go above or below your target range.

You can get custom-made widgets to mount a Polar or other watch monitor to your handlebar, or you can take the cheap option and strap on a bit of pipe lagging.

Find a Polar dealer

Ciclosport CM 4.21 HR — £41

Ciclosport 421.jpg

Ciclosport 421.jpg

One of the cheapest computers with heart rate function and the necessary strap bundled, the CM4.21 can download ride data to your PC so you can keep a record of your rides.

Find a Ciclosport dealer

Wahoo TICKR — £39.99

Wahoo Tickr.jpg

Wahoo Tickr.jpg

It’s not the cheapest option, but Wahoo’s Bluetooth Smart heart rate strap comes with Wahoo’s own Fitness app that provides training zones for fat-burning and intense training and creates a eight-week training schedule for you. It works with iPhone 4S and up and devices running Android 4.3 or later.

Find a Wahoo dealer

Polar FT7 — £49.99 (in-store only)

polar-ft7m-heart-rate-monitor.jpg

polar-ft7m-heart-rate-monitor.jpg

A sort of built-in coaching is the USP of Polar’s more expensive heart rate monitors. A feature called EnergyPointer tells you if you’re burning fat or improving your fitness and the FT7 can upload data to polarpersonaltrainer.com so you can track your training.

Find a Polar dealer

Mio Velo Cycling Heart Rate Wristband — £87.81

Mio Velo Cycling Heart Rate Wristband

Mio Velo Cycling Heart Rate Wristband

The Mio Velo measures your heart rate from your wrist and sends it to other devices via both Bluetooth Smart 4.0 and ANT+. It can also take data from other ANT+ devices – a speed and cadence sensor, for example – and re-transmit it using Bluetooth Smart, allowing you to link ANT+ sensors to a non-ANT+ smartphone.

It takes your heart rate via LEDs and an 'electro-optical cell' that monitors the volume of blood under your skin. Mio boast a 0.99 correlation to electrocardiogram in laboratory testing. In other words, they claim that it is highly accurate.

If you don’t like wearing a heart rate chest strap — and let’s face it they’re not the comfiest thing especially if you’re less than svelte — then this is well worth a look.

Read our review of the Mio Velo Cycling Heart Rate Wristband

Find a Mio dealer

Garmin Edge 25 Bundle with HRM — £129.95

Garmin Edge 25 HRM 2.jpeg

Garmin Edge 25 HRM 2.jpeg

The Edge 25 is Garmin's smallest ever GPS computer, and along with its diminutive size, Garmin has nailed the user interface, which is a dream to use.

If you don't need route mapping and navigation and just want to track all the important metrics like speed, distance, elevation — and heart rate, of course — the Edge 25 does everything you need.

You can currently pick up an Edge 25 on its own for £88 from Halfords, so you'd save money by doing that and adding the Geonaute sensor belt.

Read our review of the Garmin Edge 25 Bundle with HRM

Find a Garmin dealer

Cateye Padrone Smart — £47.08

Cateye Padrone Smart Triple Wireless Kit - head unit

Cateye Padrone Smart Triple Wireless Kit - head unit

This big-screen Cateye computer can talk to your phone using Bluetooth Smart, and to compatible sensors. You can get it on its own and use it as a head unit for data from the GPS on your phone which is then safely tucked in a pocket, or you can buy it with Cateye’s own sensors (in theory; we can't find anyone who actually has the bundle in stock). The extra £80 for the sensors is a shade pricy, but at least you can be sure they’ll work together. If you wanted to save money, though, you could use a third-party heart rate belt for about £30 paired with your phone.

Cateye’s Cycling app transmits your ride data to CatEyeAtlas, Strava or TrainingPeaks.

Read our review of the Cateye Padrone Smart Triple Wireless

Find a Cateye dealer

Mio Cyclo 315 HC — £179

Mio-Cyclo-315-HC-UK-IRE-inc-HRM-Cadence-sensor-GPS-Cycle-Computers-White-Black-0 (1).jpg

Mio-Cyclo-315-HC-UK-IRE-inc-HRM-Cadence-sensor-GPS-Cycle-Computers-White-Black-0 (1).jpg

Want heart rate, maps and GPS? This version of the Mio Cyclo 315 includes Western Europe maps, a heart rate strap and a cadence sensor. We’ve tested and liked its little brother, the Cyclo 200, which doesn’t include heart rate functions.

Garmin Edge 130 — £199.99

edge_130_main_2.jpg

edge_130_main_2.jpg

If you can live without a detailed map display, the latest offering from Garmin has line-on-the-screen navigation so you can follow planned routes, plus lots of phone connectivity and segment-racing features.

Read more: Garmin launch Edge 130 and Edge 520 Plus

Garmin Edge 820 GPS with Cadence and HRM — £310

Garmin-Edge-820-Bundle-GPS-Cycle-Computers-010-01626-11-0.jpg

Garmin-Edge-820-Bundle-GPS-Cycle-Computers-010-01626-11-0.jpg

This version of Garmin’s benchmark GPS comes with sensors for speed/cadence and heart rate, and Garmin's Cycle Map of the UK.

The Edge 820 is highly customisable, and generally very reliable with enough battery life for all but the longest of epics and the ability to run from an external battery if you’re riding for more than 14-16 hours.

Read our review of the Garmin Edge 820 GPS

Find a Garmin dealer

Garmin Edge 1000 Performance — £299

Garmin Edge 1000 - routes

Garmin Edge 1000 - routes

The luxury end of Garmin’s Edge range, the 1000 boasts a slightly bigger screen and a remote control plus a vast range of features that even includes the ability to tell you which gear your Shimano Di2 system is in. It’s wifi-enabled so it can connect to Strava and Garmin Connect to upload your ride as you walk into the house. It's been replaced in Garmin's range by the even-more-sophisticated Edge 1030 (see below) and remaining units are now available at this bargain price from Halfords.

Read our review of the Garmin Edge 1000 Performance

Find a Garmin dealer

Garmin Edge 1030 bundle — £549.99

Garmin Edge 1030 - maps.jpg

Garmin Edge 1030 - maps.jpg

Garmin's latest unit features a bigger screen, longer battery life and a host of new connectivity features compared to the Edge 1000.

The Edge 1030 gets a 3.5in high-resolution capacitive touch screen that Garmin reckons works in the wet or with gloves, and ambient light sensors automatically adjust the screen brightness to suit the riding conditions. Battery life has been extended to a claimed 20 hours and there’s a new Garmin Charge integrated battery pack accessory to double the run time to 40 hours for longer rides.

Garmin has beefed up the navigation and course planning features. Trendline utilises the many activities uploaded to Garmin Connect to provide routes using the most popular roads and off-road trails, backed up by preloaded Cycle Maps for turn-by-turn directions on all terrain with alerts for sharp corners and elevation information. You can also choose from three round-trip suggestions by choosing a distance and starting direction if you want the Edge 1030 to recommended new routes.

Read our review of the Garmin Edge 1000
Find a Garmin dealer

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34 comments

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Nixster [402 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I have a bluetooth LE one from Ebay that cost about £15 and works perfectly with my iPhone and Strava. 

I only changed to Garmin as it was better for displaying additional information on the bars than mounting the phone although Strava has since changed the display in their app.

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Meaulnes [70 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I bought a Geonaute HRM from Decathlon last year and just can't get it to work. Maybe I need to do some HIIT or maybe I've got no pulse…  2

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tigger.mike [5 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

Personally I love my Scosche (Silly name, great device). Reviewed here and DCRainmaker (http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2014/05/scosche-antbluetooth-optical.html) and I believed used as his go to heart strap. 

For me though it is brilliant for cycling as you can put in pretty much anywhere (I have it on my upper arm in the summer, just under the arm of my top) and lower arm in the winter and in the warm stuff). Charges over USB, lasts long enough for me (anything up to half IM) and you can even wear it under a wetsuit so it's ready out of transition (if you are silly enough to do that sort of thing).  You also don't have to remember to put it on before your bibshorts or base layers and it's not around your wrist which I find a pain when cycling. 

Works on BT and ANT+ so has me covered for the future. The strap is easily washable (and easily substituted for something else). 

Thoroughly recommended.

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yorkphotoworkshops [10 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

3 Garmin softbands in less than two years ( as well as an Edge 800 ruined by getting wet). Superb quality... 

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seanw18 [20 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I have a Mio wrist band hr monitor. It's comfortable but it can't handle rapid changes in HR like when doing intervals.

 

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cdamian [194 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I had no end of problems with the Garmin HRM chest straps. I run through five of them with different versions and nothing helped. Even tried some internet hacks like using the gel or cutting them in half in the middle. I thought it might be related to my weird body or heart, but see below.

So for a long time I used the Mio Link wristband, which is really convenient especially for commuting where you don't want to undress to put a chestrap on. It supports ANT+ and Bluetooth, wich is also nice if you use Garmins and your phone.
The big disadvantage is the battery life. For long rides or sportives it isn't enough, after somewhere between five and six hours it dies.

Now I switched for these rides to a cheap ANT+ HRM chest belt from Declathon and it works like the ones from Garmin should have. Battery lasts forever and it connects directly without any dropouts on the ride. I don't even have the wet it or use gel. It just works and is half the price of the Garmin one.

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londoncommute [115 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

cdamian - I've had exactly the same experience as you.  Every generation of Garmin strap didn't work for me but the far cheaper Decathlon one is great.

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mrfree [79 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

Waste. Of. Money.

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KiwiMike [1355 posts] 2 years ago
4 likes
mrfree wrote:

Waste. Of. Money.

Unless you incorporate HR training zones into your regime, and need to keep a close eye on it to ensure that over a long ride/event you don't blow up.

Then, not so much.

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hawkinspeter [1746 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
Nixster wrote:

I have a bluetooth LE one from Ebay that cost about £15 and works perfectly with my iPhone and Strava. 

I only changed to Garmin as it was better for displaying additional information on the bars than mounting the phone although Strava has since changed the display in their app.

I just replaced a Wahoo HRM (an older version than the one shown above) with one of those £15 ones and it works a treat. I use it with iPhone, Wahoo RFLKT, a Wahoo speed/cadence sensor and Cyclemeter.

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OmuGuy [24 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

Everybody's experience of cycling is different.

A drummer can probably be accurately aware of cadence.

A long-term doer of yoga probably can tell,
merely from merely from breathing,
what the current 'heart-rate zone' is.
For some people, too much technology is a waste, an intrusion, a distraction.
Perhaps, one day, I can reach such a nirvana of unquantified mindfulness.

People like me: obese from age nine,
I got into the habit of ignoring my grotesque body except when it hurt.
Breathlessness was something that happened during sex.
I never learned to pay active attention to my physical states.

Eventually, I managed to lose weight and keep it off.
I became more interested in exercise, got a bike,
experienced the freedom of the road.
But I was clueless.

A cadence meter showed me how much I had to learn.
Now, I am aware of cadence and the effects it has on endurance
and fatigue. But I was still always cycling as fast as was safe
and as swiftly as fatigue allowed.
Anything else felt like I was moving in the opposite direction
to a moving walk.

After seeing no improvement for two years,
I wanted an HRM to help me become a 'trained cyclist'.
I'd been using my smartphone and free apps for tracking rides
and was frustrated with frequent signal loss, app crashes,
and battery drain, as well.

Since I also swim, I was interested in getting something
that would count lengths for me.

I chose a Suunto Ambit 3.

Once I bought a handlebar mount from e-bay,
it was plain sailing. Handlebar mounting is essential
both to keep the data in easy sight, and because,
if you wear it as a watch, the vibrations
and jolts from the road woefully abuse your wrist.

Since then, the watch has been a joy to use.
Three pieces of data are displayed per screen:
the bottom field can be cycled through five items.
The screens are highly configurable
and you can cycle through configured screens
that favour different types of data (e.g HR vs Speed).
The Ambit 3 also has adequate navigation functions:
you draw the route online and download it to the watch.
An arrowhead appears on a line that represents the route.
Different levels of zoom are available.
For someone like me, who likes to work out where to go,
it's handy to find my way back to the turn I missed.
You select the route after choosing activity (e.g. cycling)
and then you can cycle between data monitoring screens
and navigation. Operation was pretty easy to work out and get used to.
The heart rate monitor even works in the pool.
It records HR and later uploads it to the watch
(Bluetooth signals don't travel far in water).
For me, swimming HR is more of a curiosity. Using it in a pool, however, has proved how waterproof the HR unit is.
At the end of any exercise session the watch suggests
how long you need for recovery: you don't get stronger
while you are stressing your cells, you get stronger
during the repair and remake adaptation period.
Another neat thing I like is that you can toggle
the backlight to stay on at night. I fairly often cycle
to meet friends in the next city and the watch
provides a kind of company on the way home.
HR is something you can interact with.
I used to avoid the boredom of cycling along
the monotonous riverside. Now, it's interesting to try
to stay in HR zones.
The Suunto site shows the data in interesting ways
but you can also elect to synch the data with Strava and other sites.
It's also possible to download the data and upload it
to non-selectable sites.
The social side of the Suunto site is not very interesting to cyclists
per se, the watch seems more popular with runners and general athletes.
I've been using the HRM on every ride for nearly four months -- and for tracking long walks and swims. The only negative experience has been a couple of episodes of aberrant HR data. The last time, it happened just before the battery unexpectedly ran down. I think it was because I didn't pause the watch for six hours I spent in a concrete structure and it probably used the juice searching for GPS. The time before, on a three-hour return journey at night, I still don't understand why it kept registering over 180 bpm when I wasn't even breathless. My max. HR is more like 170 bpm. As I said, these were aberrations and seem to occur with other devices.
I also got a CatEye Bluetooth speed/cadence sensor, and the Ambit 3 paired without a problem. I felt I was gambling when I shelled out cash for the watch but, all in all, the Suunto Ambit 3 has made a pleasing difference to my active life.
The only thing I really wish is for the design to be made flatter.
The GPS unit is rigidly attached at an angle to the watch face.
While this makes it compatible with wearing on the wrist,
the profile of the watch is embarrassingly conspicuous when,
at pools that do not allow watches to be worn,
I have to stuff it down my jammers.

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ianrobo [1219 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I have the Mio velo and can not recommend it highly enough. Chest straps for me never worked as 1) Sweat too much and 2) hairy thats a bad combo and never got the right readings.

The velo is excellent and when I tried to compare is very accurate to the chest strap from Garmin . I have just got the vivosmart HR and it is far more comofrtable than the Mio but still bugs with it.

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ianrobo [1219 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

indeed as it gives you the TSS value that is valuable. For sure if you do not care that much about the stats and training a waste but imagine most are.

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CXR94Di2 [2034 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes

Heart rate monitors are good if you don't have a power meter. In tandem with a power meter you can get very accurate monitoring of your performance.

Bear in mind, heart rate always lags over effort, varies with health condition and drifts with heat.

Heart rate monitor- good
Power meter -better
Power +heart- ideal

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CXR94Di2 [2034 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
cdamian wrote:

I had no end of problems with the Garmin HRM chest straps. I run through five of them with different versions and nothing helped. Even tried some internet hacks like using the gel or cutting them in half in the middle. I thought it might be related to my weird body or heart, but see below.

So for a long time I used the Mio Link wristband, which is really convenient especially for commuting where you don't want to undress to put a chestrap on. It supports ANT+ and Bluetooth, wich is also nice if you use Garmins and your phone.
The big disadvantage is the battery life. For long rides or sportives it isn't enough, after somewhere between five and six hours it dies.

Now I switched for these rides to a cheap ANT+ HRM chest belt from Declathon and it works like the ones from Garmin should have. Battery lasts forever and it connects directly without any dropouts on the ride. I don't even have the wet it or use gel. It just works and is half the price of the Garmin one.

I have over a year on my garmin chest hr sensor. It has rubberised front portion where the soft back strap clips to. It has been perfect linking to my garmin 800 and my pc when using Bkool. It is the ant+ version with a replacement battery.

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Looper35uk [25 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Just brought the Ant+ version of the Geonaute Cardio from Decathlon for my Garmin 810, works a treat and at £13:99 whats not to like....

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Ti-Buron [7 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Never, never, ever change the battery on the Garmin premium HRM, although it's a simple - if fiddly - procedure, but easier on old style... it's never worked again. Also when you keep having to take it apart and putting it back together to try to fix it, then the 4 tiny screws are liable to get chewed up - they aren't robust. I won't buy any more HRM's from Garmin as my old style version wasn't great either.

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Ti-Buron [7 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

D'oh

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ianrobo [1219 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

If someone is reading this new then please be aware that Scoshe also do a HRM, which is the one I use and Ray Maker's one of choice.

I did comment on this a year ago with the Velo and whilst it is good (and still works) for use on a bike I found it a bit too lumpy and int he way whereas the Scosche on the upper arm is a great fit.

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davel [2335 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
Ti-Buron wrote:

Never, never, ever change the battery on the Garmin premium HRM, although it's a simple - if fiddly - procedure, but easier on old style... it's never worked again. Also when you keep having to take it apart and putting it back together to try to fix it, then the 4 tiny screws are liable to get chewed up - they aren't robust. I won't buy any more HRM's from Garmin as my old style version wasn't great either.

+1

I've had it with Garmin HRMs. I'm on the tickr now.

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ianrobo [1219 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes

being really hairy I gave up on the chest straps after about 3 months and really the future is for wrist or upper arm based systems isn;t it ?

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Merchant of Cool [13 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes

Personally I love my Scosche (Silly name, great device). Reviewed here and DCRainmaker (http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2014/05/scosche-antbluetooth-optical.html) and I believed used as his go to heart strap. 

For me though it is brilliant for cycling as you can put in pretty much anywhere (I have it on my upper arm in the summer, just under the arm of my top) and lower arm in the winter and in the warm stuff). Charges over USB, lasts long enough for me (anything up to half IM) and you can even wear it under a wetsuit so it's ready out of transition (if you are silly enough to do that sort of thing).  You also don't have to remember to put it on before your bibshorts or base layers and it's not around your wrist which I find a pain when cycling. 

Works on BT and ANT+ so has me covered for the future. The strap is easily washable (and easily substituted for something else). 

Thoroughly recommended.

 

 

+1

Avatar
fukawitribe [2299 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes
davel wrote:
Ti-Buron wrote:

Never, never, ever change the battery on the Garmin premium HRM, although it's a simple - if fiddly - procedure, but easier on old style... it's never worked again. Also when you keep having to take it apart and putting it back together to try to fix it, then the 4 tiny screws are liable to get chewed up - they aren't robust. I won't buy any more HRM's from Garmin as my old style version wasn't great either.

+1 I've had it with Garmin HRMs. I'm on the tickr now.

As another voice, I bought a non-premium Garmin HRM from eBay for about £ 20 delivered around 3 and half years ago. Not missed a beat bar when needing a new battery, on battery number 3 or 4 I think (not exactly sure, no more than that). The Premium HRM seemed to have endless issues with contact corrosion and failures, the cheapo one doesn't (no exposed contacts, washable strap, wipe down sensor element). They're not all shite.

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fukawitribe [2299 posts] 6 months ago
0 likes

Ooo and 4iiii Viiiiva ? Another option (which you liked a lot) and useful if you want an ANT+ / BTLE bridge.

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Jetmans Dad [33 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
Ti-Buron wrote:

Never, never, ever change the battery on the Garmin premium HRM, although it's a simple - if fiddly - procedure, but easier on old style... it's never worked again. Also when you keep having to take it apart and putting it back together to try to fix it, then the 4 tiny screws are liable to get chewed up - they aren't robust. I won't buy any more HRM's from Garmin as my old style version wasn't great either.

My Garmin HRM is great and works really well. However, a couple of years back (after about 6 months) of use, it started to give stupid readings, and a battery change was recommended. I changed the battery (managing to chew up one of the screws putting it back together) but it made no difference.

Turned out there was nothing wrong with the monitor, and it probably didn't even need the new battery, it was the strap - apparently the salt build up from sweat eventually stops it working properly even with regular washing. Bought a Polar strap to replace it, plugged in the Garmin HRM and it has worked perfectly ever since. 

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Geraldaut [59 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

Cheap Chinese one. Always works.

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rix [223 posts] 2 months ago
1 like

I had 4 Garmin hrms while warranty lasted and when it died got Wahoo and it works flawlessly.

Avoid Garmin hrms.

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HLaB [233 posts] 6 days ago
0 likes

All the soft strap HRM's I have had have worked flawlessly untill I start washing the straps; then they go erratic.  Sometimes washing would bring them back to life for a bit then they fail intermittenly.  The first HRM I had was hard strap and that worked flawlessy for years before eventually failing.  I wasn't too dissapointed there but I've been less impressed with the soft straps. First two straps I tried the washing machine (like instructions said with no detergent) but they went arwy.  The next strap I tried hand washing in the shower with showerwash but it went awry too so I tried hand washing with just showere water (pre soap) and its failed too.  So I'm trying the DC Rainmaker tip of the Polar strap cut down to accept my current stages HRM (Garmin type with Bluetooth) and just using the wipes  7

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spindi [15 posts] 6 days ago
1 like

An alternative to the Mio Velo Cycling HR wristband is to get a Garmin Vivosmart HR+ for not much more. It can broadcast the heart rate via ANT+ and is easily picked up by my cycle computer. Battery life is decent and you get a simple but functional sports watch with GPS into the bargain.

I think others in the range will do this also but not 100% so could go for the older one without the GPS that sell really cheap.

https://www8.garmin.com/manuals/webhelp/vivosmarthr/EN-US/GUID-AC0E8CD6-FD71-4845-ADB1-2E97F785EFAC.html

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Jetmans Dad [33 posts] 6 days ago
1 like
HLaB wrote:

 So I'm trying the DC Rainmaker tip of the Polar strap cut down to accept my current stages HRM (Garmin type with Bluetooth) and just using the wipes  7

That's exactly what I did (probably picking up the advice in the same place) as outlined three posts up this thread. Mine has worked flawlessly since getting the Polar strap. It has also survived the strap being washed pretty regularly without missing a beat (pun not intended). 

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