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What to look for in tyres for winter riding, training and commuting

If you're going to carry on riding through winter, the cold, wet conditions are best handled with heavier, grippier and more puncture-resistant tyres than your summer rubber. Fortunately there are plenty of winter-specific tyres out there.

You'll get more punctures in the winter thanks to the rain. It washes glass, flints and debris into the road, where they lie in wait for an unsuspecting cyclist to trundle over. Water also makes a good cutting lubricant, helping anything sharp cut into your tyres. There's nothing much worse than fixing a puncture when it's lashing down with rain, apart from waiting for a friend to fix a puncture in the rain, that is.

The first aim of winter tyres is puncture resistance. Most manufacturers offer such tyres so there's really no reason not to switch and make your winter riding low-fuss. Such tyres usually have some sort of puncture prevention layer under the tread and beefier sidewalls to stop sharp objects finding a way through.

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Most winter tyres have some sort of belt under the tread to stop sharp objects from getting through to the inner tube.

There are downsides, and weight is usually one of them, but I'll take extra puncture protection over a bit more weight any day. Tyre makers usually use thicker, firmer rubber for the tread and stiffer sidewalls, which affect the rolling resistance of the tyre and ride comfort.

The sidewall contributes heavily towards the feel of the tyre and so a heavier/thicker sidewall will make for a harsher feel. That's where increasing the width of the tyre can make a difference. All other things being equal, a wider tyre has lower rolling resistance, so going fatter can compensate for the increased resistance of a stiffer tyres. You can run fat tyres at lower pressures too, regaining the comfort lost by the change to stiffer sidewalls.

Look for a tyre with a thick reinforced breaker belt sandwiched between the rubber tread and carcass. This will prevent flints and glass from puncturing the delicate inner tube. The sidewall too can often be reinforced to preview the potholes and large bits of debris ripping through. Lastly, grip is another important consideration. The rubber compound dictates the level of grip for the most part, though if you're riding rough surfaces there's some evidence that a light file tread is better than a slick tyre.

Pressure is important, and especially so in the winter when the roads are most likely to be wet. As a general rule, the wetter it is, the lower the pressure you want to run your tyres at. While it might be fine to ride tyres inflated to 120psi during the summer when the roads are dry, it's a good idea to go a little lower the wetter it is. It's not unknown to go as low as 80-90psi. Many of the tyres below are 25mm wide or fatter and you have to take into account the extra tyre volume when setting the tyre pressure.

Regular cleaning goes without saying, and when you're cleaning your bike pay particular attention to the tyres. Glass and flints can get lodged in there and it's a good idea to remove them. A top tip is to fill the now vacant hole with a little super glue to plug it.

We've focused mostly on robust, puncture-resistant tyres, but as StuInNorway points out in the comments, there are parts of the UK where snow and ice is a big factor too, so to that end we've added a couple of studded options. A tyre with a deep tread pattern will provide some grip on fresh snow, but once it's packed down hard, or turned to ice by a thaw-freeze cycle, the only thing that will grip is a studded tyre.

Schwalbe E-One — £34.99-£52.99

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The E-One is designed specifically for e-bikes, but that doesn't mean it's restricted purely to bikes with batteries. With a new compound that gives excellent grip levels and durability, plus a thicker tread that benefits puncture protection, the only real trade-off is the extra weight. The new Addix Race compound is very sticky and grip is amazing in both the wet and dry. On high-speed descents the way they cling to the road allows you to really let the bike go, and the supple rubber gives plenty of feedback too.

Read our review of the Schwalbe E-One tyre
Find a Schwalbe dealer

Ritchey Alpine JB WCS Stronghold 30mm/35mm — £24-£57

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Ritchey has gone inverse with the tread on its Alpine JB WCS Stronghold tyres to create a tyre that grips on light gravel and rough sections of broken country lane while also offering a smooth ride if you want to get a shift on on the tarmac. A very impressive all-round tyre choice indeed.

If youre wondering, 'JB' stands for Jobst Brandt, an engineer and author who was a big influence on Tom Ritchey. Brandt wrote the seminal book on wheelbuilding, The Bicycle Wheel, designed some of the very first electronic bike computers for Avocet, led epic rides in the Santa Cruz mountains that were famous for disregarding the traditional attachment of road cyclists to Tarmac, and spent his summers exploring the minor roads of the Alps, hence Alpine in the name of these tyres.

Brandt was also an advocate for inverted-tread tyres for dirt riding. In the days before website forums he was a prolific poster on the Usenet cycling groups where he detailed a press launch for Avocet's inverted-tread mountain bike tyres in which they proved faster in timed tests. Brandt claimed that finding was glossed over by one of the magazines and not reported at all by the others. We like to think he'd be pleased to see the idea return in these tyres.

Read our review of the Ritchey Alpine JB WCS Stronghold
Find a Ritchey dealer

Panaracer T-Serv ProTite 32mm — £29.99

Panaracer T-Serv PT Folding tyre.jpg

The Panaracer T-Serv PT Folding 700x32C tyres are intended for urban city use. Wefound them to be swift-rolling, comfortable, dependable, middleweight all-rounders: the sort of tyres capable of inducing plenty of smiles and with scope for weekend touring. Puncture resistance and wet grip are both very good, and of course the 32mm width makes for decent bump handling if you're unable to avoid a fresh pothole.

Read our review of the Panaracer T-Serv ProTite
Find a Panaracer dealer

Compass Barlow Pass TC 38mm — £56-£70

Compass Barlow Pass.jpg

The Compass Cycles Barlow Pass tyre is a tubeless-compatible (TC), ultra-supple tyre that delivers an astonishingly smooth and grippy ride. If your bike can't fit them, maybe you need a new bike. They're that good. Their width, puncture resistance and deep tread rubber make them especially suitable for winter, but they're fast and comfy enough to use year-round.

Read our review of the Compass Barlow Pass TC

Vittoria Corsa Control G+ Isotech — £39.00

Vittoria Corsa Control G+ Isotech foldable tyre.jpg

The Corsa Control G+ is the beefed-up version of Vittoria's well-respected Corsa G+. It's a great alternative to many winter-specific tyres, offering levels of rolling resistance and grip seen on your summer lightweights without compromising durability.

Compared to the standard Corsa G+ the Corsa Control G+ has a wider tread to protect the sidewalls, and the tread is 0.4mm thicker. There's a breaker belt beneath the tread too, to help reduce punctures. This extra bit of depth does mean the Corsa Control G+ feels firmer to ride than the equivalent Corsa G+ model so you lose a little of the comfort. The high thread count still makes these tyres much more comfortable than many designed for poor conditions. And we had no visits from the puncture fairy during our testing.

Read our review of the Vittoria Corsa Control G+ Isotech
Find a Vittoria dealer

Pirelli P Zero Velo 4S 28mm tyre — £31.00

Pirelli P Zero Velo tyres 3.jpg

The Pirelli P Zero Velo and Velo 4S tyre marks a very impressive return to cycling for Pirelli after a half-century hiatus. This tyre is fast, comfortable and long lasting.

The Velo 4S is based on the same technology used to develop the standard Velo tyre that Jack reviewed earlier this year. That includes the company's own SmartNET Silica compound, 127tpi casing and construction in the Hutchinson factory in France. This 'winter' version uses a rubber compound that has been tweaked to improve wet weather grip, and there's extra siping along the top of the tyre, though we all know that such grooves make nada difference.

Pirelli has also increased the thickness of the tread, but underneath there is the same aramid fibre puncture-resistant belt as the regular tyre. This belt is only located underneath the tread and doesn't extend to the sidewalls. This does contribute to the low weight; at 250g this 28mm tyre isn't giving away much to the regular version it's based on, but it won't offer the rugged sidewall of some other tyres.

Read our review of the Pirelli P Zero Velo 4S
Find a Pirelli dealer

IRC Formula Pro Tubeless X-Guard — £55

IRC 2017 IRC Formula Pro Fusion X-guard tubeless road tyres.jpg

RC might not be the most familiar tyre brand in the road bike market at the moment, but its Formula Pro Tubeless X-Guard road tyres offer exceptionally good performance, with easy tubeless installation and great durability. The price does put them at the top end of the tyre market, though.

The Formula Pro is the Japanese company's high-performance road bike tyre and this version gets added puncture protection. Underneath the tread is the X-Guard belt of cross-woven mesh fibres that boosts puncture protection by 47%, IRC's claim not ours, without compromising rolling resistance and performance.

Read our review of the IRC Formula Pro Fusion X-guard tyres

Schwalbe Marathon Winter Spiked — £32.99

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You're going to need plenty of room in the frame for these 35mm snow and ice tyres and their steel spikes, but they're renowned for their grip on everything from snow to black ice. If you want a general-purpose winter tyre for your hybrid, crosser, or gravel/adventure bike, these are the way to go.

If you've got a mountain bike, or a gravel bike with lots and lots of room in the frame, and want to go completely hog-wild in the snow, take a look at the Schwalbe Ice Spiker Pro Evolution.

If you want a budget option, there's a Schwalbe Winter with fewer spikes in a 30mm width that might even fit many modern road bikes. They'll set you back about £25 with shipping, and you can get away with just running a front studded tyre, though obviously a pair is better.

Schwalbe G-One Speed tubeless — £39.99

Schwalbe S-One tyre.jpg

Previously known as the S-One, these 30mm all-rounders from Schwalbe live up to Schwalbe's billing as 'the special one'. They're light, fast and grippy, and thanks to Schwalbe's Tubeless Easy with Microskin feature, they mount tubeless with an ordinary track pump. If you can fit them, you should.

Read our review of the Schwalbe G-One Speed
Find a Schwalbe dealer

Michelin Power All Season — £32.99 - £34.95

Michelin Power All Season Road tyre.jpg

Since 'four seasons in one day' is a description often applied to the British weather, these Michelin Power All Season Road tyres should be right at home among UK riders. After a typical English summer we can confirm that the performance is every bit as reliable as Michelin claims.

Read our review of Michelin Power All Season tyres
Find a Michelin dealer

Clement Strada LLG — £14.99-19.99

Clement Strada LLG tyres

The Clement Strada LLGs are good, all-round 28mm winter training tyres. They're quick, comfortable and grip well at a competitive price. They roll smoothly too, though the 60 tpi versions we tested aren't quite as smooth as the same tyre in a 120 tpi casing, but they've proven hard-wearing.

Read our review of the Clement Strada LLG

Panaracer Gravel King — £28

Fast-rolling and capable of tackling bad road conditions and even venturing away from the tarmac, Panaracer's Gravel King tyres are a really good option for the winter with rugged durability and great traction.

Panaracer initially introduced the Gravel king as a 26mm tyre, but has kept up with the times, producing fatter versions as bikes have evolved to better cope with crummy roads, and to venture away from the Tarmac. The 32mm and 38mm versions are particularly stellar.

Read our review of the 32mm Panaracer Gravel King
Read our review of the 38mm Panaracer Gravel King
Read our review of the 26mm Panaracer Gravel King
Find a Panaracer dealer

Specialized All Condition Armadillo Elite II — £42

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The Specialized All Condition Armadillo Elite II features a Kevlar layer sandwiched inside the tyre and stretches from bead to bead. It goes a long way to prevent sharp objects from penetrating the tyre carcass and deflating the delicate inner tube. This tyre uses a wire bead which does put the weight up, the 23mm is 375g. 25 and 28mm widths are also available.

Find a Specialized dealer

Schwalbe Marathon Plus — £23.99-£29.99

Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres

 

Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres are essentially heavy duty, ultra reliable commu-touring tyres that inspire unprecedented confidence without feeling sluggish or barge-like, as the 970g weight for a pair would imply.

Read our review of the Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres
Find a Schwalbe dealer

Schwalbe Durano RaceGuard — £19.99

Schwable have many options and and the Durano RaceGuard Tyres offer really good durability with plenty of grip in all conditions. The grip is good in both dry and wet conditions so would prove a useful addition to any bike during mixed conditions of a typical British winter.

Read our review of the Schwalbe Durano RaceGuard

Panaracer Race D Evo 3 — £24.99

Panaracer Race D Evo 3.jpg

Panaracer's Race D Evo 3 tyres feel confident in the turns and roll well enough, but don't appear to be wildly different to many other tyres with some kind of puncture resistance. Durability does seem very good, though.

The Evo 3s are an update to the Evo 2s tested on road.cc back in 2015 – the price is the same and the weight comparable too. The Evo 3 also gets the same 'hard in the middle, soft on the edge' tread compound which Panaracer is calling ZSG Dual Compound. The main difference with the Evo 3s is the way Panaracer is doing the puncture protection – something it calls 'Protite'. Rather than having a separate breaker strip layer in the tyre, the puncture protection is incorporated into the tread rubber. Panaracer claims this increases puncture protection by 25% and reduces weight.

Read our review of the Panaracer Race D Evo 3
Find a Panaracer dealer

Bontrager AW3 Hard-Case Lite tyres — £25

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Despite a puncture-resisting later, the Bontrager AW3 Hard-Case Lite tyres roll quickly and gip securely in all conditions. The tread on the sidewall gives sufficient grip in the corners and the hard case has proven more than capable of dealing with the variety of grit washed onto the roads.

Read our review of the Bontrager AW3 Hard-Case Lite
Find a Bontrager dealer

Vredestein Fortezza Senso Xtreme tyres — £36.25

The Vredestein Fortezza Senso Xtreme tyres bill themselves, as suggested in the name, as extreme weather tyres - so perfect then, for three seasons of UK riding.

Read our review of the Vredestein Fortezza Senso Xtreme
Find a Vredestein dealer

Continental Grand Prix 4 Season — £34.99 - £37.99

Continental GP 4 season cutaway.jpg

A lighter option is the Continental Grand Prix 4 Season. A tough Duraskin mesh and two Vectran anti-puncture layers beneath the tread make this a good choice. And at 280g for the 28mm version it's a good weight, for the rider wanting a fast winter tyre. Conti's max grip silica rubber compound provides a good level of grip. A good choice for winter and one that can be used in spring and autumn too. If you desire even more protection, the Gator Hardshell is a good option, with a third layer of Polyamide in the sidewalls.

Find a Continental dealer

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Road.cc buyer's guides are maintained and updated by John Stevenson. Email John with comments, corrections or queries.

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

53 comments

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BehindTheBikesheds [3322 posts] 1 year ago
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I've been using a Giant PR3 (rigid) on the front wheel of my commuter the last 3 winters, it took over from a gatorskin. So far it's been very reliable (think one puncture so far), very hardwearing and traction is excellent. 120kg bike and load around a mini rounfabout at 18mph in the wet is no problem at all. On the rear my favourite touring/winter racer/rough road audax tyre, 32mm Specialized Armadillo pro folder.

I'm sure there might be better tyres out there now but I just like them, roll better than a Conti GP4S IMHO (which i hated as a 'winter' tyre) and with only a 20g weight penalty and a true 32mm I'll snap them up whenever I can but are really hard to get now.

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JeffB [11 posts] 1 year ago
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I use gatorskins and all the negative comments have me worried, even though i have not had any issues. The issue I have is that I like to use 32mm slick tyres on my cross bikes as I find the extra width makes me safer - I don't need to swerve to avoid holes as much and the puncture protection is good, especially at the lower pressure and they are good on off road / gravel sections. The problem is that the 4 seasons version is very expensive in the 32mm size, I am not paying £50 each for high mileage tyres. Instead I am trying the scwalbe G One All-round in 35mm for the winter, so far so good. But if there is snow / ice I use Grifo's at 30psi, pretty stable.

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drjohn [56 posts] 1 year ago
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JeffB wrote:

I use gatorskins and all the negative comments have me worried, even though i have not had any issues. The issue I have is that I like to use 32mm slick tyres on my cross bikes as I find the extra width makes me safer - I don't need to swerve to avoid holes as much and the puncture protection is good, especially at the lower pressure and they are good on off road / gravel sections. The problem is that the 4 seasons version is very expensive in the 32mm size, I am not paying £50 each for high mileage tyres. Instead I am trying the scwalbe G One All-round in 35mm for the winter, so far so good. But if there is snow / ice I use Grifo's at 30psi, pretty stable.

 

My last "off" was when I switched out a front wheel that had a GP4000s, to one that had a Gatorskin mounted. I went down just riding slowly across a pedestrian crossing. IMO they should be labelled "rear wheel use only".

But the bigger 32mm tyre may be a completely different animal - the Gatorskin sidewalls are stiff enough to let you run them at low psi without risk of snakebites.

The Vittoria HyperVoyager maybe a better option if you want a big fast slick...

Also, has anyone noticed brand new front slicks can sometimes feel skittish? Or is it just a confidence thing? 

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RoubaixCube [117 posts] 1 year ago
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I personally use conti 4 seasons all year round on the commuter. Not suffered any punctures at all apart from two impact punctures when i went over a massive pothole i didnt see and that wrecked both inner tubes

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Jem PT [229 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes

I've got Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres on my Brompton and for puncture resistance they are superb. I literally wear them out without a single puncture - unlike the original tyres.  Sure they might be a wee bit heavier, but that's getting a bit academic for  this type of bike!

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kil0ran [1693 posts] 1 year ago
0 likes
drjohn wrote:
JeffB wrote:

I use gatorskins and all the negative comments have me worried, even though i have not had any issues. The issue I have is that I like to use 32mm slick tyres on my cross bikes as I find the extra width makes me safer - I don't need to swerve to avoid holes as much and the puncture protection is good, especially at the lower pressure and they are good on off road / gravel sections. The problem is that the 4 seasons version is very expensive in the 32mm size, I am not paying £50 each for high mileage tyres. Instead I am trying the scwalbe G One All-round in 35mm for the winter, so far so good. But if there is snow / ice I use Grifo's at 30psi, pretty stable.

 

My last "off" was when I switched out a front wheel that had a GP4000s, to one that had a Gatorskin mounted. I went down just riding slowly across a pedestrian crossing. IMO they should be labelled "rear wheel use only".

But the bigger 32mm tyre may be a completely different animal - the Gatorskin sidewalls are stiff enough to let you run them at low psi without risk of snakebites.

The Vittoria HyperVoyager maybe a better option if you want a big fast slick...

Also, has anyone noticed brand new front slicks can sometimes feel skittish? Or is it just a confidence thing? 

I think if you go out on a brand new slick in wet weather there's a potential for the tyre to be more skittish because it will be fresh out of the mould and I'd imagine the very top surface of the tyre will have slightly different properties. Easily scrubbed in dry weather on a short ride.

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hmf [2 posts] 1 year ago
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Simon E wrote:

Has anyone used the Hard-Case AW3 listed here? The original Bontrager Racelite Hardcase lived up to its name, it was the toughest, most thorn-proof tyre I've ever used. Would like to know if the current version has inherited the original's best qualities.

I use the AW3 on my commuter after tossing the GatorSkins I was previously using. The AW3 is a great tire and I haven't had an issues with slippage in wet conditions (and no punctures).

For New England winters I use the Schwalbe Winter HS 396.

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Initialised [337 posts] 1 year ago
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drosco wrote:

I've tried pretty much everything in my quest to find the perfect winter tyre. The best I've found is the little heralded Specialized Espoir Elite. I'm still yet to flat one, they're reasonably light and fast rolling and you can pick one up for as little as £15. 

I liked those, durable, great wet grip, but I'm running Roubaix 30/32mm Tubeless now.

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Charlie-CarbsAn... [24 posts] 1 year ago
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Just go tubeless problem solved- no punctures even with super low pressures

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ktache [2134 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes

It's still summer.  It's still summer.  It's still summer.  It's still summer.  It's still summer.  It's still summer.  It's still summer.  

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StraelGuy [1746 posts] 1 year ago
2 likes

I'm with you ktache, there's at leat 8-9 weeks of summer bike weather left. Only really starts to get miserable in November.

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John Stevenson [450 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

StraelGuy wrote:

I'm with you ktache, there's at leat 8-9 weeks of summer bike weather left. Only really starts to get miserable in November.

Forewarned is forearmed  1

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cptlik [11 posts] 1 year ago
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I like the idea of using lower pressures (and wet weather), and this summer I bought some 25mm Schwalbe Ones.  So the idea is lower pressures, more comfort, yada yada yada, problem on the front is that accoring to the recommended pressure graph (that one that that science guy came up with wear you weigh your bike at the front and the back with you on it) i want a smidge over 6 bar (87psi) but the rating on the tyre wall says the min is 6 bar!  This seems high considering all the hype about using lower pressures.

So no chance of me lowering pressure in the wet.  Or do you think that the 6bar min on the tyre wall is conservative?  What are the chances of the tyre falling off cos of the low pressure?

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hawkinspeter [4096 posts] 1 year ago
1 like
cptlik wrote:

I like the idea of using lower pressures (and wet weather), and this summer I bought some 25mm Schwalbe Ones.  So the idea is lower pressures, more comfort, yada yada yada, problem on the front is that accoring to the recommended pressure graph (that one that that science guy came up with wear you weigh your bike at the front and the back with you on it) i want a smidge over 6 bar (87psi) but the rating on the tyre wall says the min is 6 bar!  This seems high considering all the hype about using lower pressures.

So no chance of me lowering pressure in the wet.  Or do you think that the 6bar min on the tyre wall is conservative?  What are the chances of the tyre falling off cos of the low pressure?

I've definitely ridden Schwalbe Ones at much lower pressures than that. To be honest, I found that anything over 70psi made them extremely slippery in the wet so I stopped using the Schwalbes. I think the lowest pressure was a mistaken ride on them with only about 20psi in and the tyres never came off (the handling was really crap, though - I  don't recommend it). I ended up using them at around 60psi for the best combination of speed and not falling off in the wet.

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cptlik [11 posts] 1 year ago
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hawkinspeter wrote:

I've definitely ridden Schwalbe Ones at much lower pressures than that. To be honest, I found that anything over 70psi made them extremely slippery in the wet so I stopped using the Schwalbes. I think the lowest pressure was a mistaken ride on them with only about 20psi in and the tyres never came off (the handling was really crap, though - I  don't recommend it). I ended up using them at around 60psi for the best combination of speed and not falling off in the wet.

Yeah i do find them a bit unasuring in the wet.

Thanks for the advice, I'll give it a go!

 

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John Stevenson [450 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

cptlik wrote:

according to the recommended pressure graph (that one that that science guy came up with wear you weigh your bike at the front and the back with you on it) i want a smidge over 6 bar (87psi)

Frank Berto's recommended pressure ideas are based on some sound thinking about tyre behaviour, but need to be tempered a bit with considerations based on what actually happens to a tyre in the real world.

For example, if you're braking hard on a descent, then your weight is significantly shifted forward and you need more pressure in the front tyre to cope. Ditto if you're riding crappy roads. Tubeless tyres mitigate this somewhat, but whacking your rims against pothole edges is still a bad idea.

Like so many things in bike set-up, Berto pressures are best treated as a starting point for experimentation rather than as hard and fast rules.

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BBB [508 posts] 1 year ago
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cptlik wrote:

I like the idea of using lower pressures (and wet weather), and this summer I bought some 25mm Schwalbe Ones.  So the idea is lower pressures, more comfort, yada yada yada, problem on the front is that accoring to the recommended pressure graph (that one that that science guy came up with wear you weigh your bike at the front and the back with you on it) i want a smidge over 6 bar (87psi) but the rating on the tyre wall says the min is 6 bar!  This seems high considering all the hype about using lower pressures.

So no chance of me lowering pressure in the wet.  Or do you think that the 6bar min on the tyre wall is conservative?  What are the chances of the tyre falling off cos of the low pressure?

You can completely ignore minimum pressure recommendations on tyre sidewalls.

As long as you bike handles well and you rim strikes aren't an issue, you can lower the pressure as much as you want. You aren't going to die.

Personally at just under 80kg, I run 28mm tubeless tyres, effectively measuring 32mm on very wide rims at 60/40 PSI rear/front respectively. 6bar is a stupid pressure to run (unless you have no choice) and defies the purpose of pneumatic tyres - suspension.

One more thing to bear in mind is that stiffer tyres need oboviously lower pressure to obtain the same sag/drop, grip and comfort.

 

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MarkiMark [104 posts] 1 year ago
1 like

I've been using the IRC Formula Pro Tubeless X-Guard, running them tubeless through last winter since a review on here somewhere. It's the first winter I've not punctured. My rides are mixed road and gravel, including my commute, using Hunt 36 Wide Carbon rims and 28mm tyres. Can't speak highly enough of them.

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Erudin [1 post] 1 year ago
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Jack Brown's Mile Muncher 700c 25c is a good budget  tyre. Made in Japan the quality looks excellent, after 700 miles on them first impressions are good.

40% more rubber depth than standard tyres, and Protite anti-puncture belt and edge to edge taffeta-nylon puncture protection. Grip in wet and dry is fine and they roll really well.

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Miller [284 posts] 11 months ago
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Slightly off-topic but as he's mentioned in the review of the Ritchey tyre, Jobst Brandt... I used to read the Usenet group rec.bicycles.tech, this was long before the modern internet, and he was on there all the time. He was incredibly definite, in that American way, no room for doubt in any view he expressed. Smart guy and a serious engineeer but maybe not loved in the way Sheldon Brown was. I have a copy of his excellent wheelbuilding book and still use it to remind me of the correct order of lacing spokes. Jobst would not have approved of modern wheels, he didn't see a need for anything beyond 36-spoke Mavic MA2s laced to stock hubs.

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John Stevenson [450 posts] 11 months ago
1 like

Miller wrote:

Jobst would not have approved of modern wheels, he didn't see a need for anything beyond 36-spoke Mavic MA2s laced to stock hubs.

I used to frequent those usenet groups too, and learnt a lot from Jobst. I seem to recall he was still posting when the first 'system' wheels were introduced and, yep, he was very skeptical about them. 

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TheBillder [29 posts] 1 month ago
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Still a bit confused by this article. I completely get the puncture resistance thing, and I see the addition of studded tyres for full snow, but am I alone in just wanting lots more grip in the dark months? And if not, what are the general principles?

I'm about to winterize my gravel bike having summerized it with cheapo Michelin slicks as I ride 90% on tarmac, rural where possible. Do I refit the Clement xplor (tubed) it had originally? They are a bit knobbly which should help with leaf gunge and mud. Does that help at all as temperatures fall? Or do you need a winter rubber compound?

As the rear has noticeable knobble wear (who knew what my pathetic power output could do?), should that tyre stay on the rear given the worse consequences of losing the front?

I should admit that I'm a risk averse person and quite cautious on descents. I do worry about patches of ice, diesel and frozen leaf mould perhaps more than most, and to raise my confidence, I just want to feel I have the right set up.

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ktache [2134 posts] 1 month ago
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I felt the the original Continental Winter Contacts helped with my confidence in winter conditions.  Of course they might not have provided any more grip, but I thought they were better than the Contact Travels I had put on for the summer.  I have not tried the second iteration, so cannot comment on them.

I would put big knobblies on for spring and autumn, because of the leafy mulch and bits of mud, and full Spike Claws on for snow.

Though that was for my tarmac commute, for the past few years it was knobblies all year because of the filth I had to ride through, apart from the Spike Claws for the Beast.  They were also larger volume, so I could drop the pressure and have more comfort on out deteriorating roads.

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