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How to decide between these two super-popular groupsets

If you’re choosing between Shimano Tiagra and Shimano 105 – either fitted to a complete bike or as an upgrade on an existing bike – here’s everything you need to know to make the right decision.

A groupset is a component manufacturer’s collection of mechanical parts, usually covering the derailleurs, shifters, brakes, chainset, bottom bracket, cassette and chain. Brands group these parts into various different levels.

If you want to know more about what a groupset is, check out our beginner’s guide.

Shimano offers six road groupsets. Starting at the top these are:

• Dura-Ace
• Ultegra
• 105
• Tiagra
• Sora
• Claris

Plus, Dura-Ace and Ultegra are available with Di2 electronic shifting, and Dura-Ace, Ultegra and 105 are also available with hydraulic disc brakes, and Shimano offers both hydraulic and cable discs for Tiagra

The recommended retail price of a complete Shimano Tiagra groupset (chainset, shifters, derailleurs, chain, cassette, brakes, bottom bracket) is £500 or £450, depending which retailer you choose to believe. A Shimano 105 R7000 groupset is nominally £596. That’s a difference of £96-£146.

However, both groupsets are widely available heavily discounted. You can pick up a Tiagra group for about £300, and 105 R7000 for as little as £400, though cheap deals like that usually don't offer the full range of chainring, cassette and crank length options.

Read more: Complete guide to Shimano groupsets

The biggest difference between the groupsets is that 105 – which is the most popular groupset in the world, according to Shimano – is 11-speed (there are 11 sprockets on the cassette) whereas Tiagra is 10-speed.

Tiagra is offered with both a double chainset (there are two chainrings) and a triple chainset (there are three chainrings) whereas 105 comes as a double only.

A number of technologies have filtered down to 105 R7000 from the more expensive Ultegra and Dura-Ace groups and Tiagra components are a little heavier. As ever, you pay more for lighter weight.

Read our full Shimano 105 R7000 groupset review.

Read our full Shimano Tiagra 4700 groupset review.

Dual control levers (mechanical)

  Weight RRP Online price
Tiagra 493g (pair) £174.99 £126.95
105 476g (pair) £194.99 ~£162.00

The main difference between the dual control levers is that Tiagra (below) is a 10-speed system and 105 is 11-speed.

Shimano-Tiagra-4700---STI-lever

In both cases the bracket is made from GFRP (glass-fibre reinforced plastic), the main lever is aluminium, and you get screw-operated reach adjustment to bring the levers closer to the handlebar for smaller hands.

Gear shifting on the Shimano 105 R7000 group is light and snappy, a significant improvement on the previous 105 iteration. Shimano has captured the very light lever action of Ultegra and Dura-Ace and brought it down to a cheaper price.

105 R7000 brifters

Tiagra has cables that are routed underneath the handlebar tape like the higher level Shimano groupsets, a feature that was a long time coming to the budget groupset.

When we reviewed Tiagra we said, “Shift feel is perhaps a little heavier than Dura-Ace or Ultegra, but that's an unfair criticism given the huge price difference.”

Unlike 105, Tiagra is available with a triple chainset (with three chainrings rather than two, see below). If you want to go down that route you’ll need to buy the compatible dual control levers.

Dual pivot brakes

  Weight RRP Typical price
Tiagra 360g (pair) £58.98 (pair) £46.98 (pair)
105 388g (pair) £79.98 (pair) £67.98-£75.98 (pair)

One of the biggest differences between 105 and Tiagra is the braking performance.

Shimano 105 R7000 brake calipers

Shimano calls its latest calliper design SLR-EV Dual Pivot and this is now found on 105 (above), Ultegra and Dura-Ace. The new symmetrical twin pivot design equalises the braking forces through each arm for better control and power.

Slowing rather than stopping can be achieved with just a couple of fingers applying pressure to the lever and it's easy to avoid locking a wheel. The brake pad compound feels a little more grippy than the previous version in both wet and dry conditions.

Shimano Tiagra 4700 brake caliper.jpg

The latest Tiagra brakes (above) do provide more stopping ability than before but they aren’t a patch on 105. The brakes will certainly stop you in a hurry, they're just lacking in feel and feedback through the levers.

The one-piece brake blocks also exhibit some flex, and changing them isn't as simple as swapping a brake pad in more expensive cartridge brakes such as those found on 105 and Ultegra.

Shimano says both 105 and Tiagra have room for tyres up to 28mm wide. However, the latest 105 R7000 brakes have slightly more drop (the distance from the mounting bolt to the brake pads) than before: 51mm v 49mm. That implies you should be able to run 30mm tyres with the right frame.

105 is also available in a direct mount option (you need to have a compatible frame and fork) where the brake arms bolt straight on to the frame/fork rather than via a central bolt. There is no Tiagra direct mount option.

Disc brakes

  Weight RRP Online price
Tiagra hydraulic NA £449.99 ~£300.00
105 NA £469.98 £452.88

The 105 hydraulic STI units for disc brakes are 11-speed, as you'd expect, while the Tiagra are 10-speed. The new 105 R7000 STI units are considerably streamlined compared to both their predecessors and the Tiagra versions.

Riders with small hands should definitely look to the R7000 brakes. The ST-R7025 levers sit closer to the handlebar than the standard ST-R7020 levers.

105 R7000 hydro brifters

We've been impressed with the Tiagra hydraulic discs. They were fitted to the Genesis Datum 10 that Mike Stead tested in mid-2017, and he commented: "I'm rapidly coming to the conclusion that Shimano can do no wrong brake-wise, the performance being consistently excellent across all specs from base model non-series to Dura-Ace. Stopping power is enhanced by the use of a 160mm rotor up front, meaning there's never any need for more than two fingers on the levers, even with hands on the hoods let alone in the drops." The Tiagra brakes specifically boosted the Datum 10's performance downhill: "the wide tyres and hydraulic brakes give you the confidence to bomb rough-tarmac descents without fear."

Shimano Tiagra disc brakes.jpg

Chainset

  Weight RRP Typical price
Tiagra 910g (50-34 tooth) £109.99 £49.99 - £64.99
105 716g (50-34 tooth) £129.99 £108.90-£116.99

Shimano Tiagra (below) and 105 each feature chainsets with aluminium crank arms and a steel axle. They both use a four-arm spider with uneven spacing between those arms, the idea being to provide strength and stiffness where it’s needed while keeping the weight low.

Shimano Tiagra 4700 chainset triple.jpg

The outer ring in both cases is aluminium/GFRP. Again, the design is intended to provide stiffness.

Both 105 and Tiagra are available in 165mm, 170mm, 172.5mm and 175mm crank lengths. Diminutive riders can also choose a 160mm 105 R7000 crankset

Chainring options are slightly different. With 105 you can decide between 53-39, 52-36 and 50-34 tooth setups but Tiagra lacks the traditional, racing-orientated 53-39 option.

On the other hand, Tiagra is available in a triple chainset configuration: 50-39-30. You’ll need a triple-compatible left hand shifter and front derailleur as well.

All 105 (below) and Tiagra chainsets use the same bolt circle diameter (BCD, 110mm) so it’s easy to swap from one size of chainring to another.

Shimano 105 R7000 chainset

As commenters have pointed out, the 105 chainset is significantly lighter than the Tiagra, but is reported to work fine in an otherwise Tiagra set up, so if you have a Tiagra bike, a 105 is a worthwhile upgrade.

Front derailleur

  Weight RRP Typical price
Tiagra 106g £34.99 (band on) £23.49 - £23.99
105 109g £32.99-£34.99 £27.99 - £28.80

The 105 (below) and Tiagra front derailleurs are made from the same materials – aluminium with a chrome plated stainless steel chain guide – and each comes in braze on and band on varieties to suit different frames.

Shimano 105 R7000 front mech

The differences are that the 105 front derailleur is suitable for 11-speed use and a large chainring of between 46 and 53 teeth while the Tiagra one (below) is 10-speed compatible and takes a large chainring of between 46 and 52 teeth. (If you want to use a chainring larger than 53-teeth, Shimano says you have to go all the way up to a top level Dura-Ace front derailleur). You can also get a Tiagra front derailleur that’s suitable for use with a triple chainset.

The two derailleurs have very different appearance because the 105 R7000 uses what Shimano calls a "compact toggle design". This design — previously seen on Dura-Ace and Ultegra — increases tyre clearance and provides a cable tension adjustment screw in the body of the derailleur.

Shimano Tiagra 4700 front mech.jpg

We found the Tiagra front derailleur to shift cleanly, smoothly and quietly, even under load.

Rear derailleur

  Weight RRP Typical price
Tiagra 277g (long cage) £37.99 (short), £39.99 (long) £25.00/£26.50
105 220g (short cage), 227g (long cage) £44.99 (short), £47.99 (long ) £37.40-£40.90

Following the design of the Ultegra R8000 rear derailleur launched the year before, the 105 R7000 is a radical departure from previous 105 derailleurs and looks very different from the Tiagra unit. The 105 R7000 derailleur uses the Shadow design Shimano originally developed for mountain bikes to tuck the derailleur in to the bike and increase the largest sprocket it can handle.

The Tiagra version is designed to be used as part of a 10-speed setup while the 105 version is designed for 11-speed. Each is made with a bracket body, plate body and plates made from aluminium.

Shimano 105 R7000 rear mech GS

Both Tiagra and 105 rear derailleurs come in short cage and long cage versions for use with different cassettes. The short-cage Tiagra derailleur can handle up to a 28-tooth large sprocket, while the 105 R7000 equivalent can shift up to a 30-toother. The long cage versions will both handle a 34-tooth sprocket, though we've found the long-cage version of the 105 R7000 will actually shift all the way to a 40-tooth chainring without any hassle at all.

Shimano Tiagra 4700 rear mech mid cage.jpg

When we reviewed Tiagra we said, “Shimano says it has revised the cable pitch on the rear derailleur (above), claiming it now offers 'precise and long-lasting shifting performance'. It's certainly living up to those claims compared with old Tiagra.”

Cassette

  Weight RRP Typical price
Tiagra 308g (12-28) £29.99 (11-25, 12-28), £34.99 (11-32, 11-34) £17.93
105 284g (11-28) £42.99-£47.99 £34.40 - £36.95

The Tiagra and 105 cassettes both feature nickel plated steel sprockets although the 105 version has an a spider arm and a lockring made from anodised aluminium and it’s considerably lighter. The biggest difference, though, is that a 105 cassette is 11-speed while a Tiagra one is 10-speed.

105 is available in 11-25, 11-32 and 12-25 tooth options, plus a newly-introduced 11-34 that will fit on a 10-speed wheel, while Tiagra comes in 11-25, 12-28, 11-32 and 11-34 tooth.

Shimano CS-HG700 11-34 cassette

When he reviewed the previous Shimano 105 Stu said, “Resistance to wear has always been a reason for me to buy 105 sprockets even with an Ultegra or Dura-Ace equipped bike, and that remains here as the nickel-plated sprockets are standing up to pretty much anything you can throw at it.

“The shifting is sharp and those computer designed tooth profiles must be doing their job as even under load there were no missed shifts.”

Chain

  Weight RRP Typical price
Tiagra 273g (114 links) £19.99 £11.99
105 257g (114 links) £29.99 £17.50

The 105 chain (below) is 11-speed rather than 10-speed, so it’s narrower and a little lighter than the Tiagra version.

Shimano 105 - chain.jpg

They both run very quietly thanks to Sil-Tec (PTFE) coated links.

Bottom bracket

  Weight RRP Typical price
Tiagra 92g (threaded), 71g (press-fit) £16.99 £14.99
105 77g (threaded), 69g (press-fit) £29.99 £14.95
Shimano 105 - bottom bracket.jpg

The Tiagra press-fit bottom bracket is nearly as light as the 105 version. Although the threaded model is quite a bit heavier than the 105 one (above) in percentage terms, you’re still only talking about 15g, and that’s negligible considering the overall weight of your bike. That said, for the tiny increment in typical price, the BB-R60 (105) is also used in the Ultegra groupset and has an excellent reputation for durability.

Conclusion

Tiagra is a really impressive groupset. It does everything you want from a mid-level road bike with only a few minor quibbles. The biggest decision is whether you're really fussed about having the 11-speed of Shimano's more expensive 105.

If you go for Tiagra you can’t upgrade to 105 one component at a time because 10-speed and 11-speed drivetrain components aren’t interchangeable. You’d have to upgrade most of the groupset components at once for optimum performance. As well as an 11-speed cassette having an extra sprocket, the spacing between those sprockets is smaller, an 11-speed chain is narrower than a 10-speed chain, and, obviously, an 11-speed shifter has one more position than a 10-speed one. However, you should be able to put a 105 rear derailleur in a Tiagra system as the cable pull ratios are the same, but to go to 11-speed you're eventually going to need the big bang of new sprockets, chain and shifters.

If you go for 105, on the other hand, you could swap to Ultegra or Dura-Ace gradually as each component wears out. That might be attractive, but only if you’re realistically likely to do this.

If you want really low gears, 105 is the better choice. In theory both systems with handle a 34-tooth largest sprocket, but while we've heard of people persuading Tiagra to cope with a 36-tooth, we have direct experience of a long-arm 105 mech cheerfully shifting to a 40-tooth sprocket.

The other major difference between the two groupsets is that the 105 brakes are considerably better than Tiagra ones. They are a real highlight both in terms of all-out power and fingertip control.

Tiagra offers excellent value for money but 105 is certainly the better groupset and we’d recommend going for it if your funds allow because of the better brakes, the small weight saving and the upgrade to 11-speed.

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34 comments

Avatar
Batchy [403 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Just say that you can mix and match some of the components. For example I run a 105 5700 10s groupset with a 5800 11s chainset and brakes. They work flawlessly so there is no reason to think otherwise regarding Viagra 10s and 105 11s.

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alotronic [607 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I have new Tiagra on my Datum, 5600 105 on another bike and 6400 Ultegra on another.  All very good, but new Tiagra is better than older 105 - hoods are nicer shape, lighter shifting.

The only rubbish thing about the new Tiagra is the weight of that chainset - it weighs a ton. It doesn't help the feel of the bike at all and it's around 200gm heavier than a cheap chainset like a miche, or even the old-school square-taper triples.

If I wanted a triple these days then I would buy a tiagra set and immediatley swap the chainset out - then I would be very happy.

The bike I bought (a lovely gensis Datum) was substantially cheaper in Tiagra form, and the whole range had the same (crappy) wheels. The money saved will go where it matters - wheels! And that chainset  1

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cyclesteffer [370 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Agree with the comments above - You can mix the Ten Speed Tiagra 4700 but add a 105 5800 Chainset if you want.

Also New Tiagra 4700 is much crisper than old 105 5700, plus its got the adjustment of the levers, whereas 105 5700 did not.

This might be an important consideration if you are considering possibly buying a 2nd hand bike because its got 105 5700. If the price difference between it, and a new bike with Tiagra 4700 is minimal. Buy the new bike with Tiagra instead. It will be better.

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daturaman [38 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

FWIW you can fit cartridge brakes to the Tiagra calipers.

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pockstone [254 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Are the latest Tiagra rear derailleurs compatible with 105 (5700) 10 sp. shifters? (And vice versa, ie are new Tiagra shifters OK to work with a 5700 105 derailleur?)

 My plan to increase the size of my cassette to 32 teeth got very complicated when I was informed that Tiagra had a different cable pull to 105. Phase 1 saw me making do with 30 teeth which works  fine with the 105 mech( despite it having a nominal maximum of 28 teeth).

Phase 2 paired a 9 spd Alivio MTB mech. with a 34 tooth cassette. Not really a success but that may have been down to a cable kink problem.

Phase 3 swapped the Alivio for a Deore XT mech. which seems to work much more smoothly. (Not actually ridden it further than round the block yet.)

Unfortunately I can foresee a Phase 4 when the 105 shifters give up the ghost. Will I be able to replace them with new Tiagra shifters and be able to swap between the XT and 105 mechs as the mood takes me? Or is the 'revised cable pitch'  a bit of built in obsolescence?

Avatar
Simon E [3553 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes
alotronic wrote:

The only rubbish thing about the new Tiagra is the weight of that chainset - it weighs a ton. It doesn't help the feel of the bike at all and it's around 200gm heavier than a cheap chainset like a miche, or even the old-school square-taper triples.

An extra 185g compared to 105 is "rubbish"? That seems a bit OTT to me. Perhaps it's time to start drilling holes in your saddle...

The lighter, more expensive chainrings are hollow. I believe this means that they wear out quicker.

The difference in cost of replacing chain & cassette is less than I had expected: at RRP in the table £50 (4700) v £80 (5800), while CRC prices are £38 and £50.

Avatar
Richard1982 [108 posts] 2 years ago
5 likes
Simon E wrote:

The lighter, more expensive chainrings are hollow. I believe this means that they wear out quicker.

I don't see how the chainrings being hollow would affect the wear on the teeth.

Avatar
StraelGuy [1631 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I have the 5800 cranks and the teeth aren't hollow. The big ring is a 3D forging and there is a ring of hollow dimples around the inside edge below the teeth to save weight.

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mike the bike [1152 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
cyclesteffer wrote:

  ...... Also New Tiagra 4700 is much crisper than old 105 5700, plus its got the adjustment of the levers, whereas 105 5700 did not ...... 

 

Not sure about that Mr Steffer.  My current 105 (5700) has the usual plastic shims that take up lever travel.  They are a different shape from the Tiagra's but work just as well.

Avatar
Simon E [3553 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
Richard1982 wrote:

I don't see how the chainrings being hollow would affect the wear on the teeth.

No, but I remember it being mentioned. Different material?

Avatar
barbarus [536 posts] 2 years ago
13 likes
Batchy wrote:

They work flawlessly so there is no reason to think otherwise regarding Viagra 10s and 105 11s.

Stiff competition then!

Avatar
Batchy [403 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
Batchy wrote:

Just say that you can mix and match some of the components. For example I run a 105 5700 10s groupset with a 5800 11s chainset and brakes. They work flawlessly so there is no reason to think otherwise regarding Viagra 10s and 105 11s.

Further to this, I also run a 6700 Ultegra 10s groupset and apart from a slight weight penalty my 5700 105 functions equally as well, if not smoother, than the Ultegra. If I ever need a new groupset in future it will be 105 as it is quite frankly unbeatable for function and value.

Avatar
Duncann [1485 posts] 2 years ago
4 likes
barbarus wrote:
Batchy wrote:

They work flawlessly so there is no reason to think otherwise regarding Viagra 10s and 105 11s.

Stiff competition then!

Makes it hard to choose!

Avatar
Disfunctional_T... [356 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
pockstone wrote:

Phase 1 saw me making do with 30 teeth which works  fine with the 105 mech( despite it having a nominal maximum of 28 teeth).

Get the 5701. The Shimano 5701 rear derailleur is spec'd for handling a 32-tooth cog, and can probably handle quite a bit larger, depending on your rear hanger.

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ianmoss [2 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Just a note un 'mix and match.

I replaced the long cage Tiagra 4700 with a shortcage, and went for the 105 10 speed (5700) which you would think would be a straight swap... It's not.

I couldn't get the shifting / indexing right.

When I researched the issue, people were saying that the whole mecahnicals of the shifter (cable pull) and the motion of the RD were the same as 5800 and 6800. So if you plan on a swap, ignor the 'speed' of the parts and go for the latest generation.

It would seem that the base mechanicals of the shifters internals are the same as 105 and Ultagra but with 10 clicks instead of 11...!!!

I must say, I was sceptical of the tiagra being the 'lower' range of croupset, but that was the option of the BMC in my prefered colour came in. (more of a decision on the great frame than the whole bike package) It has been flawless, all summer, I did change the brake pads for the latest cartridge inserts though, much better!

Avatar
Batchy [403 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
Duncann]</p>

<p>[quote=barbarus

wrote:
Batchy wrote:

They work flawlessly so there is no reason to think otherwise regarding Viagra 10s and 105 11s.

Stiff competition then!

Makes it hard to choose!

[/quote

Yeah this Nexus of mine is highly unpricktable !

Avatar
caaad10 [190 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

"if you go for 105, on the other hand, you could swap to Ultegra or Dura-Ace gradually as each component wears out. That might be attractive, but only if you’re realistically likely to do this."

In theory, then yes - but in reality by the time anything actually starts to wear out Ultegra and Dura Ace will probably  have made some sort of change that makes it impossible, like going to 12 speed for example. One of of the reasons I chose my old bike was because the 105 was 10 speed, like Ultegra and Dura Ace of the same period.

Avatar
RW [19 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

"

Phase 2 paired a 9 spd Alivio MTB mech. with a 34 tooth cassette. Not really a success but that may have been down to a cable kink problem.

Phase 3 swapped the Alivio for a Deore XT mech. which seems to work much more smoothly. (Not actually ridden it further than round the block yet.)

"

I had a lot of problems with my 5700/9sp XT mech setup until I was shown how to attach the rear mech cable to the XT mech. It needs to be attached via the upper side of the pinch bolt on the mech, rather than below the bolt as intended if running mtb shifters.

When the shifters give up the ghost, you might consider using a regular road groupset with a Wolftooth Roadlink RD hanger. That'll cope with up to a 40t cassette.

Avatar
pockstone [254 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Thanks Disfunctional T... & RW, I'll keep an eye on the shifting. Seems OK on the bike stand but past experience tells me that 'on the road' is adifferent matter. It's a  Shadow mech and the angle of the cable already looks a bit contorted when attached to below the pinch bolt. 

Thanks for the hanger advice also. My knees may well appreciate 40 teeth.

Avatar
Woldsman [299 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
pockstone wrote:

Thanks Disfunctional T... & RW, I'll keep an eye on the shifting. Seems OK on the bike stand but past experience tells me that 'on the road' is adifferent matter. It's a  Shadow mech and the angle of the cable already looks a bit contorted when attached to below the pinch bolt...

I have what is mainly a 10sp triple Shimano 105 setup (5703) and a Shimano XT Shadow 9sp (M772) rear derailleur on my 'winter' bike.  In my experience it shouldn't require any special contorting at the pinch bolt (the so-called 'hubhub' method?) and the only adaptation I've had to make is to cut the cable outer to insert a Jagwire inline adjuster as this particular model of rear mech does not have a barrel adjuster.

If you don't mind my suggestions perhaps it is worth looking first at replacing the inner cable as it's the cheapest thing to do, then if that doesn't work maybe having the rear mech hanger alignment checked. (On my olde worlde 10sp Ultegra (6700) bike I replaced both the rear mech and hanger and was never satisfied with the shifting.  I eventually bought a Park Tool DAG2.2 and straightened the hanger.  Even with brand new rear mech and hanger the alignment had been some way out.  Just a thought.)

(And as a further aside on the 105 v Tiagra discussion - I bought a friend the 5800 calipers and fitted them on her bike as her mainly 4700 setup came with Tektro (?) calipers that weren't up to much.  Apart from some initial faffage with the ferrules everything worked fine together. 'New Super-dooper SLR' or whatever.)

 

Avatar
Vejnemojnen [289 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
ianmoss wrote:

Just a note un 'mix and match.

I replaced the long cage Tiagra 4700 with a shortcage, and went for the 105 10 speed (5700) which you would think would be a straight swap... It's not.

I couldn't get the shifting / indexing right.

 

 

no offence, but it was obvious fact since the 47.. came out, that it uses a different actuation ratio as that of older 10 spd components.

 

so I do not even get, why did you even try to do such a mix. A 11spd 5800 derailleur works well with 4700 shifters, but it is well known, that older 10spd components are with a different ratio (shorter cable pull-larger actuation ratio of the derailleur)

 

why did you even try to mix the 47xx with SiS (1.67 ratio) components?

 

edit: just look at side-by-side comparison pictures of older (sis-ratio) derailleurs and the new-line 9000-6800-5800-4700 rds. they hardly have any resemblance in terms of fixing bolt position compared to pivot bolts, and their side plates differ as well.

 

nb: the new sora r3000 actually is still with the old actuation ratio, therefore, you can use older shimano rear derailleurs with the new concealed-cable sora shifters without any issues.

Avatar
pockstone [254 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Quote: 'I have what is mainly a 10sp triple Shimano 105 setup (5703) and a Shimano XT Shadow 9sp (M772) rear derailleur on my 'winter' bike.  In my experience ...'

Thanks Woldsman.

Tidy job.

Cable was replaced quite recently and has been working fine since.

I have a barrel adjuster on the down tube so, with careful pretensioning of the cable, I've been able  to adjust the indexing with travel to spare in the event of stretch.

The outer cable at the rear mech needs shortening so when I do that I'll introduce an adjuster as you have. (I can't help but notice that you have a bit of a long loop at the back too! Possibly to accommodate the adjuster?)

When did it all become so complicated?!!!

Avatar
Vejnemojnen [289 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

my grief if the lack of cassette choice.

 

a 13-25 or 13-26 would be very good imho, the smaller the increments are, the better. campag has very good ratio 10 speed cassettes, whereas shimano forces this ridiculous trend with 11-12t starting cogs, which are mostly left untouched by free-time weekend warriors 99% of the time..

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tsarouxaz [132 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

tiagra 4700 series 10sp shifters and deraileurs have totaly diferent shift-pull ratio than other road shimano 10sp systems. be aware of that. you cannot use tiagra 4700 shifters with an 105 or ultegra 10sp deraileur, nor 105 or ultegra shifters of 10sp with the tiagra 5700 10sp deraileurs. shimano has changed the ratios on the 11sp shifters to be more presice and it has moved this to the tiagra line. if you want to go inexpensive, go for  new tiagra 10sp not 105 10sp. 

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stenmeister [357 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

The Shimano website here shows you what is compatible between various generations of 105 and Tiagra.

 

http://productinfo.shimano.com/#/com/

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barbarus [536 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

Shimano have done a good job with the colour of the tiagra stuff though. Squint, and it could be ultegra.

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kil0ran [1302 posts] 1 year ago
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In the last two years I've gone from Ultegra Di2 to 105 and now a mix of 105 & Tiagra on both bikes. Tiagra shifters and mechs are proving to be utterly reliable and were easy to set up. Unless you need 11 speeds, go with Tiagra and spend the difference on top quality finishing kit.

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don simon fbpe [2847 posts] 1 year ago
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Looking at a caliper upgrade and have come a cross this.

Quote:

The Shimano 5800 has gone 11 Speed for the latest incarnation of the 105. The 5800 has been inspired by the innovations of the more upper end Shimano Ultegra and Dura Ace; you can see the technological influences across the design of the 5800 components.  More advanced and lighter than its predecessors and with a more eye catching design, the 5800 promises high performance and is one of the latest cycling must haves. 

Specifications:

Enhanced brake arch proportions give a quicker linear response and increased power
Must be used in conjunction with ST-5800, ST-6800 or ST-9000 STIs for correct leverage ratio
Dual-pivot calliper brake with super SLR-EV design for quick linear response, increased rigidity and improved braking power
Low profile outer cable stop position improves cable routing for reduced friction
Cartridge brake shoes for easy replacement
Convex washers on the brake shoes offer toe-in brake adjustment and easy alignment
Lightweight aluminium construction, with an anodised finish to preserve the good looks
Compatible with 28c tyres
49 mm drop

What the hell?

Does mean that they will not function with 4700 levers?

I don't understand where the leverage ratio comes in to the degree that the brakes won't work, and thus must be used with...

Nor what the number of gears has to do with brake calipers.

 

#Shitmano

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kil0ran [1302 posts] 1 year ago
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4700 levers work absolutely fine with 105 calipers. Excellent feel and response, perfectly able to haul my considerable bulk up on a sixpence, even with caliper brakes. Check the compatibility chart on si.shimano.com - when 5800 was released it didn't work with 4600 levers as the pull ratio was different, that's changed and everything from 4700 up uses the same ratio now. Agreed that shouldn't affect braking.

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kil0ran [1302 posts] 1 year ago
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Article needs updating to feature the redesigned 105 front mech which is now similar to DA/Ultegra - low profile so no issues with the arm hitting mudguards, Allen head limit screws, inline cable tension adjuster, and no need to do that fiddly eyeballing of which way the converter pin should be set. Probably the best £30 upgrade you can buy, and compatible with 4700 too.

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