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Think the rim brake is dead? Think again as we find plenty of choices

Is the rim brake dead? From the list of bikes we’ve pulled together below, that’s definitely not the case, but it is clear that disc brake bikes are becoming the main choice for a lot of brands and several retailers list more disc brake bikes for sale than rim brake bikes.

The disc versus rim brake topic is one that sets forums and social media networks ablaze with passionate supporters of each system. But what if you prefer rims brakes and are wondering what your options are for a new road bike in 2019?

We’ve had a scout around and pulled together a list of rim brake bikes still being offered. It’s clear that at the higher-end rim brakes appear to be dwindling with the very newest road bikes being designed entirely around disc brakes, but the lower the price the more rim brake choices increase.

- 10 of the hottest 2019 road bike

Up to about £1,500 most road bikes are still using rim brakes, but the more you spend the more disc brakes become an increasingly common sight. The price of disc brakes has got lower since they were first introduced in about 2013 with the high-end tech being trickled down to lower-priced groupsets.

Look 795 Blade RS - front brake.jpg

Will we eventually see rim brakes wiped out completely? Probably not, but they’re set to become a lot more scarce in the future. As long as the professionals are using rim brakes then bike brands will continue to offer rim brake bikes but this year we’ve seen more discs in the peloton. Deceuninck - Quick Step has won 29 races (at the time of writing) all on disc-equipped Specialized bikes, so change is in the air.

As far back as 2015 bike brands have been pushing their comfort-focused endurance bikes onto disc brakes. Giant was the first to develop its Defy entirely around disc brakes, and today finding an endurance bike with rim brakes is increasingly difficult. And the same is happening with the latest breed of aero road bikes, the likes of the Specalized Venge and Cannondale SystemSix are only offered with disc brakes.

The biggest choice of rim brakes are found on regular lightweight all-round road bikes, the likes of Giant’s TCR or Trek’s Emonda, for example.

Your choices

sworks tarmac

Specialized is offering just three road bikes with rim brakes in 2019, the majority of the models are disc brakes only. Specialized has been backing disc brakes with its latest Venge aero road bike and Roubaix endurance bike only offered with disc brakes, which leaves just the Tarmac your only option if you want rim brakes.

Tarmac Comp

However, even here the rim brake choices are limited to just three models. At the top, there’s race-ready S-Works Tarmac (£9,150) and the cheapest option is the Tarmac Comp (£3,150). Better snap them up before they disappear altogether. You can also buy the S-Works Tarmac frameset (£3,400).

Things are a bit better at Giant. Its Defy endurance bike might be disc-only, but there are five models of the Propel aero bike with rim brakes, and seven of the TCR Advanced, Giant's lightweight allround road bike.

2020 Giant Propel Advanced Pro 0

The Propel Advanced Pro 0 2020 (£4,699) is a race-ready bike with Ultegra and SLR deep section carbon wheels and an aero handlebar and stem.

2020 Giant TCR Advanced Pro 0

This is the TCR Advanced Pro 0 (£4,399) with Shimano Ultegra Di2 and SLR carbon wheels and finishing kit. 

MY19-TCR-ADV-3_Color-B

At the other end of the range is the TCR Advanced 3 (£1,399) with a carbon frame and fork and a Shimano Tiagra groupset. 

The Trek range still shows a healthy number of rim brake bikes across the Madone, and Emonda ranges for men and women, though there are fewer very-high-end bikes with rim brakes than last year, and carbon versions of the comfort-orientated Domane are now disc-only.

2019 Trek Madone SLR8

The most expensive rim-braked Madone that Trek still lists is the Madone SLR 8 (£6,200), nominally a 2019 model, with Shimano Dura-Ace components and Bontrager Aeolus Pro 5 carbon wheels.

2020 Trek Emonda SL5

The Emonda SL 5 (£1,550) is the most affordable carbon fibre Emonda, a bike pitched as a lightweight climbing and all-round choice. This model gets a Shimano 105 groupset and alloy wheels.

r872-black-tiagra-web_1

British brand Ribble offers a few rim brake bikes in amongst all the disc-equipped road bikes. This is Ribble R872 (£999) which provides a smart carbon frame and fork with a Shimano Tiagra groupset including rim brakes. 

endurance_slr_ultegra_intrgrtdbars__frontangled

Spend a bit more and you could consider the Endurance SL R Series which starts from £2,499 with an Ultegra groupset. The name suggests long-distance comfort but the bike has been designed with aero in mind, with aero shaped tube profiles and a one-piece integrated handlebar and stem. /

2020 Orbea ORCA M20 TEAM PWR

Basque country brand Orbea has moved over to disc brakes with an increased focus in recent years but its 2020 Orca range includes a number of rim brake models priced from £1,299 to £3,499. Here’s the £2,899 Orca M20 Team PWR with a full carbon frame and fork and a Shimano Ultegra groupset. 

SCULTURA_LIMITED_MY2019

Merida’s range of Reacto (aero) and Scultura (all-round) road bikers are fairly evenly split between disc and rim brakes. This Scultura Limited (£2,800) provides a clean and modern carbon frameset equipped with an Ulegra mechanical groupset and alloy wheels.

REACTO_TEAM_MY2019

If you want a team replica speed machine, this Reacto Team-E (£8,000) might interest you. It’s got the same red and black paint job as Bahrain-Merida professional race bikes and it rolls on Fulcrum Speed wheels with a full Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 groupset doing the braking and gear changing.On the other hand you might want to read what Amnesty International has to say about Bahrain first.

bianchi special record

You’d expect a brand like Bianchi to still offer rim brakes, and indeed it does. In fact, its lightweight Specialissima is only offered with rim brakes, there is no disc brake option at all. Here’s a Specialissima with a Super Record 12-Speed groupset. The price? £10,500.

bianchi pantani

There’s also a Marco Pantani special edition for fans of the late Italian climbing specialist and winner of both the Tour de France and the Giro d'Italia in 1998. Just £3,700 for the frameset. We'll have two.

If you want a Cannondale, don’t waste your time looking at the SystemSix aero bike as that is discs only, instead you want to check out the long-running SuperSix Evo. This model bucks the trend as of the 16 bikes in the 2019 range 11 are fitted with rim brakes, giving you plenty of choice, and they're still easy to find.

SuperSix Evo Carbon Tiagra

The SuperSix Evo Carbon Tiagra (now just £1,100) is the most affordable and has all the features of the top-end Evo but fitted with more affordable components, from the Tiagra shifters to RS/Formula wheels.

SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod Dura-Ace Di2

Go the other way and the SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod Dura-Ace Di2 (now £5,524) is the most expensive option with rim brakes. It’s based around a Dura-Ace Di2 groupset with Fulcrum Racing Quattro Carbon wheels and a HollowGram Si crankset.

2020 Cannondale SuperSix Evo Ultegra 2

But what about the brand-spanking new 2020 SuperSix Evo, you ask, the one with the dropped seatstays? Cannondale offers two models of the new platform with rim brakes, with Shimano Ultegra (£2,499.99, above) and Shimano 105 (£1,999.99) respectively, and there's a woman's version of the 105-equipped bike.

If the SuperSix Evo is too aggressive for you and you want a mile-muncher endurance bike, you want the Synapse, but both the alloy and carbon ranges are only offered with disc brakes.

Canyon doesn’t disappoint rim brake fans with a large number of models across its Endurace, Ultimate and Aeroad ranges.

full_2017_ultimate-cf-evo-10-ltd_c1158

This Ultimate CF EVO 10.0 LTD (£9,999) weighs a claimed 5.8kg, a crazy low weight that few disc bikes can come close to. 

full_ultimate-cf-sl-8-aero_c1294

More realistically priced is the Ultimate CF SL 8.0 Aero (£2,549) which combines an Ultegra mechanical groupset with Mavic Cosmic Carbon wheels. And it’s red! Everyone knows red is faster right?

full_endurace-cf-8-di2_c1024

Providing a more relaxed position and extra comfort features is the Endurace CF 8.0 Di2 (£2,079) which comes with Shimano Ultegra Di2, DT Swiss P 1800 Spline wheels and weighs a claimed 7.5kg.

2020 BMC TEAMMACHINE SLR01 TWO

BMC’s Teammachine has long been one of the lightest and best performing all-round race bikes, and the latest version has been designed around both rim and disc brakes. The former is offered in two builds plus a frameset, The cheapest full bike is the £4,449 Teammachine SLR 01 Two, equipped with a Shimano Ultegra groupset and Mavic wheels.

2020 BMC TEAMMACHINE ALR ONE

There’s also the Teammachine ALR with an aluminium frame and offered in two builds, with this Shimano 105-equipped model at £1,500.  

- The stuff they never tell you about disc brakes

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David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

33 comments

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Rick_Rude [333 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes

Does anyone proofread anything?

Below £1,500 most road bikes are still using disc brakes, but the higher up the price ladder you go the more disc brakes start to become the dominant choice

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BehindTheBikesheds [3322 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes

RIP rim brakes is a bit silly really because it's only some manufacturers whom are thinning out the choices and that's usually only at the top end, I'll be long gone before rim brakes stop being available for cycles if they ever disappear at all, one of the greatest inventions/systems come up with by mankind, simple, effective and elegant.

There is no benefit for me to buying a disc braked bike even if I could over the ugliness of them, as I've said before, unless I crash/destroy one of the bikes then I'm pretty much done. of course I might get an itch to buy a hyper-bike, but to be honest for my (low) level an ex conti pro team frame with some reasonably high spec components is more than enough for me to go fast/entertain me.

I have however bought up some parts to see me through for a few years, it's not the frames/braking that is the problem for certain types of cyclist, it's the gearing systems and the route manufacturers have gone down to totally ignore what the vast majority of cyclists want/need and still lack/fall short to what could already have been as near to ideal for all abilities/all terrain/type of cycling.

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risoto [105 posts] 3 months ago
6 likes

Thank God, another over-hyped road bike product. Disc brakes are more expensive, heavier and a hassle to maintain plus they make noise all the time. Having bikes with both disc brake systems (mechanical and hydraulic) I strongly prefer rim brakes. They brake just perfect.

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huntswheelers [182 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

you'll be doing an RIP disc brakes next.....lol.....

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Plasterer's Radio [546 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

Same old comments...lol

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handlebarcam [1322 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes

Rim brakes will become increasingly hard find... until one of the big bike companies comes out with an innovative new type of disc brake that integrates the rotors into the rim, for lighter weight and better aerodynamics. And charges an extra £1000 for it. Plus, of course, another new bottom bracket standard, that goes without saying.

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Prosper0 [229 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

What a dumb article. I know you guys have to push new disk bikes to make sales for your advertisers but come on..

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Dingaling [110 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes

I bought a new (gravel) bike about 6 weeks ago. I would have preferred rim brakes but there were no pegs for v-brakes on the frame or fork and no top end caliper brakes to go over wide tyres so I settled for SRAM Red 22 disc brakes.  They are crap and the front brake is unbelievably bad. The front brake is so poor I nearly ran straight out into the main road and only stopped in time by using FAR more strength on the lever than I ever have to use on my Record rim brakes. I'm now looking for pads that will hopefully make a dramatic improvement. So far Swiss Stop look like a good option. Anybody know better?

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CXR94Di2 [2687 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
Dingaling wrote:

I bought a new (gravel) bike about 6 weeks ago. I would have preferred rim brakes but there were no pegs for v-brakes on the frame or fork and no top end caliper brakes to go over wide tyres so I settled for SRAM Red 22 disc brakes.  They are crap and the front brake is unbelievably bad. The front brake is so poor I nearly ran straight out into the main road and only stopped in time by using FAR more strength on the lever than I ever have to use on my Record rim brakes. I'm now looking for pads that will hopefully make a dramatic improvement. So far Swiss Stop look like a good option. Anybody know better?

 

Not familiar with Sram hydraulics, other than mtb stuff and thats great.  Im use to shimano and its brilliant for stopping powe and modulation.  Even better is Hope which will mate to Shimano levers.  There is something fundamentally wrong with your hydraulic brakes if you cant lift the rear wheel off the ground whilst hard braking with the front.

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IanEdward [326 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
Dingaling wrote:

I bought a new (gravel) bike about 6 weeks ago. I would have preferred rim brakes but there were no pegs for v-brakes on the frame or fork and no top end caliper brakes to go over wide tyres so I settled for SRAM Red 22 disc brakes.  They are crap and the front brake is unbelievably bad. The front brake is so poor I nearly ran straight out into the main road and only stopped in time by using FAR more strength on the lever than I ever have to use on my Record rim brakes. I'm now looking for pads that will hopefully make a dramatic improvement. So far Swiss Stop look like a good option. Anybody know better?

I'm no fan of discs (on road) or SRAM, but that does sound like something is wrong, my SRAMs were great in the dry, it was only the howling in the wet which made me get rid of them.

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IanEdward [326 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes
Quote:

Deceuninck - Quick Step has won 29 races (at the time of writing) all on disc-equipped Specialized bikes

I'd bet any money they would have won on rim brake bikes as well, in fact, I'll bet they're only riding disc because their sponsors made them...

Specialized still do the Allez with rim brakes by the way, I've stuck some Swisstop BXP pads in and it is the perfect winter bike, fast, simple, light, quiet smiley 

Looking forward to fitting some Ultegra callipers, will improve the braking even more.

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David Arthur @d... [954 posts] 3 months ago
1 like
Dingaling wrote:

I bought a new (gravel) bike about 6 weeks ago. I would have preferred rim brakes but there were no pegs for v-brakes on the frame or fork and no top end caliper brakes to go over wide tyres so I settled for SRAM Red 22 disc brakes.  They are crap and the front brake is unbelievably bad. The front brake is so poor I nearly ran straight out into the main road and only stopped in time by using FAR more strength on the lever than I ever have to use on my Record rim brakes. I'm now looking for pads that will hopefully make a dramatic improvement. So far Swiss Stop look like a good option. Anybody know better?

Sounds to me like you need to bed your brakes in. That's a downside to disc brakes, they need bedding in to get full power, usually some good hard braking on some big descents takes care of this. I'd love to see manufacturers finding a way of providing disc brakes that are already bedded in

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fukawitribe [2861 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
David Arthur @davearthur wrote:
Dingaling wrote:

I bought a new (gravel) bike about 6 weeks ago. I would have preferred rim brakes but there were no pegs for v-brakes on the frame or fork and no top end caliper brakes to go over wide tyres so I settled for SRAM Red 22 disc brakes.  They are crap and the front brake is unbelievably bad. The front brake is so poor I nearly ran straight out into the main road and only stopped in time by using FAR more strength on the lever than I ever have to use on my Record rim brakes. I'm now looking for pads that will hopefully make a dramatic improvement. So far Swiss Stop look like a good option. Anybody know better?

Sounds to me like you need to bed your brakes in. That's a downside to disc brakes, they need bedding in to get full power, usually some good hard braking on some big descents takes care of this. I'd love to see manufacturers finding a way of providing disc brakes that are already bedded in

True - although it only takes a few minutes to get most of the benefit.. and, yeah, there's something seriously off with the posters set-up if that's what they're experiencing - in particular i've never experienced a decent set of hydraulic disc brakes (road or off-road) that required more effort to use, mostly far less.

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slappop [79 posts] 3 months ago
5 likes

I had disc brakes on an urban bike and found them fiddly, temperamental, noisy and prone to damage.

It's not clear to me why I'd want them on a road bike when rim brakes just work.

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festina [66 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes
CXR94Di2 wrote:
Dingaling wrote:

I bought a new (gravel) bike about 6 weeks ago. I would have preferred rim brakes but there were no pegs for v-brakes on the frame or fork and no top end caliper brakes to go over wide tyres so I settled for SRAM Red 22 disc brakes.  They are crap and the front brake is unbelievably bad. The front brake is so poor I nearly ran straight out into the main road and only stopped in time by using FAR more strength on the lever than I ever have to use on my Record rim brakes. I'm now looking for pads that will hopefully make a dramatic improvement. So far Swiss Stop look like a good option. Anybody know better?

 

Not familiar with Sram hydraulics, other than mtb stuff and thats great.  Im use to shimano and its brilliant for stopping powe and modulation.  Even better is Hope which will mate to Shimano levers.  There is something fundamentally wrong with your hydraulic brakes if you cant lift the rear wheel off the ground whilst hard braking with the front.

Will Hope mate with Shimano!? Shimano use mineral oil and all the Hopes I've had use dot4.

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festina [66 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

Discs make sense for MTB, CX and road bikes with carbon rims. If your road bike has alloy rims (and isn't a wet weather endurance/commuter) then there aren't really any benefits.
However optimising a frame for a disc brake is different to a rim brake so manufacturers either need to compromise on design, build two different bikes (see CAAD12) or drop one option all together.
People want bikes to be more comfortable and with wider tyres. Discs offer this with slimmer stays (which don't need to react braking force) and almost unlimited tyre clearance. And they really are the best solution for carbon rims.

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Jimmy Walnuts [80 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes
festina wrote:

And they really are the best solution for carbon rims.

 

Don’t trot out the ‘rim brakes wear out carbon wheels’ tosh please. It’s completely unfounded internet rumour mill nonsense. File under ‘all cyclists don’t pay road tax and jump red lights’.

 

FWIW – direct mount callipers with good quality carbon brake tracks from the likes of Zipp and Campagnolo/Fulcrum are easily as good as disc brakes for the average road cyclist in all conditions (as I know from several years of experience) . The stopping power on the latter is truly incredible. If it’s good enough for Lotto, Movistar, Bahrain and UAE on a fast technical descent in the rain, it’s more than good enough for a weekend puffer.

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festina [66 posts] 3 months ago
1 like
Jimmy Walnuts]<p>[quote=festina wrote:

And they really are the best solution for carbon rims.

 

Don’t trot out the ‘rim brakes wear out carbon wheels’ tosh please. It’s completely unfounded internet rumour mill nonsense. File under ‘all cyclists don’t pay road tax and jump red lights’.

No, wasn't what I was thinking. Consistency of breaking in all conditions, which you don't get with carbon rims is a starting point but I was actually thinking more about the forces on the brake track.
In plane tension the carbon fibres are strong, out of plane (i.e. bending) it comes down to the strength of the resin. Carbon clincher rims for rim brakes need to be strengthened in this area where disc brake rims don't.
Ever wondered why carbon tubular rims are so much lighter than their clincher siblings? It's because the rim brake surface is braced top and bottom, the clincher is only braced at the bottom. Therefore you have less of a bending effect on the brake track. And given that the brake track also holds your tyre in place it's kind of safety critical.

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Fish_n_Chips [596 posts] 3 months ago
0 likes

I love disc brakes in winter and CX but in summer I love my rim brakes too.

Had an accident and broke my neck from car pulling out and maybe I would be less injured if I had disc brakes maybe, but it was a last second thing where either brake wouldn’t have helped.

Riding again but slowly and yes have disc and rim brakes.

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ktache [1957 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes

Fish_n_Chips, glad to hear you are riding again, how do you cope with "the fear"

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PJ McNally [593 posts] 3 months ago
2 likes
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Dingaling [110 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

Several of you responded to my post about my sram disc brakes.

I agree:

they need bedding in. I did give them 300km and they are still poor.

I should be able to brake and get the back wheel in the air. Not close yet.

I haven't detected any sponginess in the lever that would indicate air in the line but I'll have to get a bleed kit and check.

In the meantime I have cleaned the disc and pads and will ride the bike today and hope the brakes start to improve. What else can I try beyond a bleed check and different pads? Change of make is a pricey option.

 

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IanEdward [326 posts] 3 months ago
1 like

Pads glazed maybe? They can develop a glassy surface after a while, worth gently sanding with some fine wet and dry paper until they're 'matt' again.

What size rotors? Much as I would like to, I'vecresisted fitting 140mm rotors to my CX bike as I think they're too wee for my 85kg.

Also, I wouldn't use getting the front wheel in the air as the absolute measure of brake power, my Deore discs are good but don't have that immediate 'snap' of a brake with big MTB rotors, or even of dry, well set up V-brakes!

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kil0ran [1639 posts] 6 days ago
0 likes

Got one of each (well actually 2 rim and 1 disc, but one of the rim brakes is the indoor trainer so doesn't really count).

Rim brakes currently more reliable and needing less lever force to stop than the disc brakes.

Possibly the fact that the disc brake bike is an all up sopping wet 15KG tourer/gravel bike with panniers, rack, and big knobbly tyres is a contributory factor.

Oh and the disc brakes howl in the wet, but at least I'm not trashing the rims with New Forest toothpaste.

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EM69 [37 posts] 5 days ago
1 like

Yawn, anyone fancy a pint...

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hawkinspeter [3907 posts] 5 days ago
5 likes
EM69 wrote:

Yawn, anyone fancy a pint...

It's a bit early isn't it?

Oh wait, I'm on holiday...

 

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iandusud [148 posts] 4 days ago
0 likes

Whilst I appreciate the benefits of disc brakes on an MTB and on a winter bike I prefer the simplicity and light weight of rim brakes on a summer bike. Unfortunately if you want an endurance type bike for summer use there are very few options with rim brakes now. I bought a Rose CGF a couple of years ago with rim brakes as it was one of very few options with rim brakes. It is bike that I can ride all day and weighs in at just over 7kg. Try finding such a bike now. The only option Rose now has in an endurance bike with rim brakes is with an alloy frame (not a bad thing as such but still no CF option). This means that if you want a CF bike with rim brakes you're pretty much limited to a race bike which in reality isn't suited to all day riding. Just my 2d

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Stebbo [4 posts] 4 days ago
0 likes

In all my years and many 10s of thousands of miles on a bike all as a roadie, since the advent of Dual Pivot calipers brakes I have never thought about brakes as a weak point.

With machined rims and normal maintainance It just isnt up there as a issue for me.  I can lock up a front or back wheel easily in both wet and dry. Traction is more of a limit than braking performance.

If people want discs that is great, but Tubeless tyres are bigger benefit to me and is an area that does improve my riding life.

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IanEdward [326 posts] 4 days ago
0 likes
Quote:

Unfortunately if you want an endurance type bike for summer use there are very few options with rim brakes now.

 

This has always been my biggest beef with manufacturers switching en masse to discs, I don't want them but I need an endurance style road bike due to ongoing back issues, I also ride a Rose (the alloy Xeon Team) but trying to replace it will be tricky. Custom Ti seems to be the way! I'll start saving now. Alternatively I might just do those exercises my physio gave me until I can bend myself over an X-Lite 4, they're still offering that with rim brakes at least.

Since we're being force fed discs (commentators on Tour of Britain talking about Giant, SBC and Trek going 100% disc next year, no rim brake models!) I wish the big manufacturers would do something to address the noise discs make in the wet, and the issue of rapid pad contamination for those of us who actually ride their 'all weather' disc brakes on the road in all weathers, which is ironically when I prefer to take my rim brake bike to avoid the racket my discs make in the wet!

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yupiteru [76 posts] 4 days ago
0 likes

The problem is, I find disc brakes bloody ugly, they remind me of my girlfriends knickers after she has had a night on the magic mushrooms - NOT A PRETTY SIGHT!

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