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Why you should use a torque wrench to avoid expensive and dangerous over-tightening

A torque wrench is a tool that allows you to tighten a bolt to a precise amount, so that it's as tight as it needs to be and — importantly — no tighter. Most torque wrenches let you know with a distinct click when you've reached a set tightness.

Why is getting the tightness of your bolts important? Too loose and you run the risk of a bolt coming undone, too tight and there’s the danger of causing serious damage to your bike and, as a result, to yourself. Over-tighten a seat clamp, for example, and you could ruin a carbon-fibre frame.

You’re too smart to let that happen? It’s easily done. The mechanics at your local bike shop will tell you about people who’ve cost themselves a lot of money by getting it wrong. Torque wrenches aren’t exactly cheap but buying one could save you a lot of cash in the long run.

You'll also need a torque wrench to install some power meters so they provide accurate measurements, though this is less common than a few years ago.

Torque bolts - 1.jpg

Torque bolts - 1.jpg

The amount that you should tighten a bolt varies between components, so always check manufacturers’ recommendations.

This Shimano Ultegra crank, for instance, comes with the instruction: “Each of the bolts should be evenly and equally tightened to 12-14N·m by torque wrench”. The N·m stands for Newton metre.

Torque bolts - 2.jpg

Torque bolts - 2.jpg

This seat clamp requires 4N·m.

If you're wondering what a Newton metre is, it comes from the definition of torque. A torque is a rotational force. Force is measured in Newtons, as you'll recall from GCSE physics. Torque is the force multiplied by the distance between the point where it's applied and the centre of the bolt. You get a torque of 4 Nm by applying 4N to the end of a spanner a metre long, or — if you don't happen to have a set of stupendously large spanners — a 40N force on a 10cm spanner.

The right torque for a particular bolt depends on what it's made from, what the parts it fits into are made from and — if it's part of a clamp — what the thing it's clamping is made from, among other things.

Torque wrenches have become a must-have in the last few years because there's so much carbon fibre and very light aluminium in modern bikes. Clamps around carbon components can easily do damage if over-tightened, so a torque wrench is essential if you're handling such gear.

A torque wrench is also useful for big jobs, when you may not realise just how tight something needs to be. Square taper cranks, for example, typically need around 40 N·m, which is surprisingly hard to achieve without a long spanner.

Torque wrench types

BBB TorqueSet Adjustable Torque Tool .JPG

BBB TorqueSet Adjustable Torque Tool .JPG

Different torque wrenches work in different ways, but one common type allows you to set your required torque by turning a knob at the end of the handle. This one (above) from BBB costs £52.48. You fit the appropriate head, then turn the wrench until a distinct ‘clunk’ tells you that you’ve reached the correct torque.

To maintain accuracy, manufacturers of adjustable click-type torque wrenches usually recommend you send the tool back to the factory to be calibrated after a certain amount of use: check the manual for your tool's particular requirement.

Birzman Digital Torque Wrench.jpg

Birzman Digital Torque Wrench.jpg

If you can't live without an LCD display, then there are torque wrenches that'll feed your desire for digits. You can either read the torque from the display as you tighten the bolt, or set a target torque and it'll buzz and flash a light when you reach it.

Park Tool PTD-4_002.jpg

Park Tool PTD-4_002.jpg

One other option is to use something like this Preset Torque Driver from Park Tool (£39.99). This one allows you to tighten 3, 4, 5mm and T25 bolts accurately to 6N·m, clicking when you’ve reached the required torque. Drivers set to other torques are available.

Park Tool Torque Wrench TW-1.jpg

Park Tool Torque Wrench TW-1.jpg

You might also run across a beam type torque wrench like the Park Tool TW-1, above. This indicates torque with a pointer that simply indicates how much the tool's main arm has deflected as you turn the bolt. Beam wrenches are incredibly simple, very tough and don't have to be sent back to the factory to be recalibrated. If the pointer isn't on zero when the wrench is at rest, you just bend it until it is.

However, you can't set the torque in advance and get a satisfying click when you reach it, so beam-type wrenches have all but disappeared. Park no longer makes the TW-1 or its big brother, the TW-2.

5 of the best torque wrenches

Effetto Mariposa Giustaforza II Pro — £139.99

Effetto Mariposa Giustaforza II Pro.jpg

Effetto Mariposa Giustaforza II Pro.jpg

Effetto Mariposa was one of the first brands to offer a high-quality, high-precision torque wrench specifically for bike use. This Pro version has a two-way ratcheting head for speedy tightening, a handy addition to the original's fixed head. It's not cheap, but it has a very useful 2-16 N·m range, it's very accurate and it oozes class.

Find an Effeto Mariposa dealer
Read our review of the original Effetto Mariposa Giustaforza

BBB TorqueFix BTL-73 — £52.49

BBB TorqueFix BTL-73.jpg

BBB TorqueFix BTL-73.jpg

Not as sophisticated as the Giustaforza, but much, much cheaper, this is a decent generic torque wrench at a very reasonable price. There are several very similar tools available: the X-Tools Pro Torque Wrench and Pro Bike Gear torque wrench are almost identical. Buy whichever you can find cheapest.

Find a BBB dealer

Topeak D-Torq — £140.95

topeak d-torq torque wrench.jpg

topeak d-torq torque wrench.jpg

The Birzman digital wrench we mentioned earlier is no longer available, but this Topeak torque wrench with a digital display is very similar. It has a ratcheting head, a range of 1-20 N·m and can be set in 0.01N·m increments. To be honest, that's a tiny bit silly. It's hard to imagine needing more than 0.5N·m precision, but it's amusing for geek points.

If you need more oomph, the £159.99 D-Torq DX has a range of 4-80N·m.

Find a Topeak dealer

Park Tool ATD-1.2 — £62.86

Park Tool ATD-1.jpg

Park Tool ATD-1.jpg

Most bike-fettling jobs that really call for a torque wrench require fairly low torque values, like the 4-6 N·m range of the Park Tool ATD-1.2. It's quite expensive for a limited-function tool, but does what it does so well that it's very highly regarded.

Find a Park Tool dealer

Ritchey Torque Mini Tool Key Set - 4N·m or 5N·m — £22.50

ritchey-mini-torque-key-set-5nm.jpg

ritchey-mini-torque-key-set-5nm.jpg

Ritchey popularised the idea of a single-setting torque wrench with its first Torqkeys, but they were also supplied with just one hex size, which was fine if it was the one you needed, but a bit limiting if not. The latest version bundles a selection of useful bits with either a 4N·m or 5N·m body. Moulding a driver for a Shimano Hollowtech crank cap into the handle is a nice touch.

Find a Ritchey dealer

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Mat has worked for loads of bike magazines over 20+ years, and been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. He's been road.cc technical editor for eight years, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. We send him off around the world to get all the news from launches and shows too. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a past winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer.

16 comments

Avatar
KiwiMike [1368 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes

I own a set of the Prestacycle preset Torqkeyratchets - 4, 5, & 6Nm. They are genius for fast, repetative settings, like adjusting brake blocks etc and cannot go out of calibration. At £11 each there is simply no excuse not to have them. For stems and seatpost clamps these are critical - if you don't use one, you're doing it wrong - period. http://nextdaytyres.co.uk/details.aspx/PRESTACYCLE-TORQKEY-T-HANDLE-TORQ...

I also own the CDI Torqcontrol, which is adjustable from 2-8Nm in 0.1Nm increments.  Very, very nice indeed that one. http://www.amazon.com/CDI-Torque-Products-TorqControl-Screwdriver/dp/B00...

For the larger settings I went with Silverline/Sealy ones from t'net for £30-£60. They work fine, and come with calibration certificates. The only thing you may be giving up over models costing three-ten times as much is bi-directional torquing for BB's and pedals - but you can get around this by using Crow's Feet adapters to reverse the direction.

The Barnett Bicycle Institute Torque Wrench Adapter is a GENIUS bit of kit that turns *any* tool - cone spanners, weird BB cup tools - into a torque-able tool: http://www.bbinstitute.com/store/tools/bbi-torque-wrench-adapter-detail - not cheap, but spend once, love it for a lifetime.

Avatar
DeanK [23 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I got a lifeline adjustable torque wrench from Wiggle. £29,99. Good piece of kit and saved me a seat post or two.

Avatar
Dan S [198 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

If my stem says 5.5Nm, would a 5Nm do the job?  In other words, are the readings written on the bike part a required tightness or a maximum?

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markfireblade [63 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

The 5.5 would normally be a maximum

Avatar
Devastazione [42 posts] 9 months ago
1 like

I love my Giustaforza from Effetto Mariposa. I'm sure there's equally good and cheaper wrenches out there but the Giustaforza is boxed like it's pure jewellery..lol..

Avatar
imaca [84 posts] 9 months ago
0 likes
Dan S wrote:

If my stem says 5.5Nm, would a 5Nm do the job?  In other words, are the readings written on the bike part a required tightness or a maximum?

Yeah, it will do, a torque wrench is not a super accurate way to set bolt tension anyway (because is depends on estimation of friction), it's just an easy way to be fairly accurate.

Avatar
hawkinspeter [2000 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes

What, no mention of the Ice Toolz Ocarina? Light enough to carry with you:

http://www.halfords.com/cycling/bike-maintenance/bike-tools/ice-toolz-oc...

However, my favourite for on the road fettling is the Topeak torqbit:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/topeak-torqbit/

Or, combined with one of the tiniest usable ratchet tools:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/topeak-ratchet-rocket-lite-ntx/

Avatar
Yorkshire wallet [2055 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes

Never used a torque wrench on my bike. May explain my stripped thread on my MTB brake posts.....

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bike.owner [212 posts] 3 weeks ago
1 like
Mat Brett wrote:

Effetto Mariposa ... has a very useful 2-16 N·m range, it's very accurate and it oozes class.

It also oozes a mechanism prone to locking up and enabling you to exceed the preset torque. Looks great. Feels great. Costs plenty, especially after you have crushed something because of it. Not a tool to trust.

These are tools to trust:

Beam type: Warren & brown. 1-25Nm work of art.

Ratchet: Stahlwille 730N/2. 2-20Nm. 0.2Nm increments across the range. Ridiculously accurate and indestructible.

Avatar
fenix [999 posts] 3 weeks ago
2 likes

Not had one in 35 years of bikes. Don't think I've broken anything that a torque wrench would have fixed. 

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pl6125 [11 posts] 3 weeks ago
0 likes

Topeak Torqbox Nano DX - Compact and great for travelling. You seem to have reviewed part of it here.

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shaws [10 posts] 3 weeks ago
0 likes

https://www.tredz.co.uk/.M-Part-Torque-Wrench_45214.htm is this the same as the BBB BTL-73? Could be a bargain if it is.

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bike.owner [212 posts] 3 weeks ago
2 likes

Ther are no torque wrench bargains if they don't come with a calibration certificate from a recognised testing laboratory. Yes, that also means nearly every bike torque wrench sold by dealers is rubbish. Your money. Your parts. Take risks as you will.

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BehindTheBikesheds [2025 posts] 3 weeks ago
0 likes

Bought a Stanley 4-5 years ago, used it once on a carbon crank, never bothered with it since and frankly I think it was a waste of time/money. If you've wrenched a bit you get to know what works and what doesn't and even with carbon it's not that difficult to judge by feel how much you need to do something up to be secure, safe and not knacker the component.

If you're not confident and have high end bits then don't scrimp on getting a torque wrench as bike.owner says, some tools you can get away with them not been the best as it sometimes really doesn't matter for the odd bit of maintenance a shit torque wrench you're utterly reliant on could crack your downtube, crush bars etc.

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DoctorFish [131 posts] 3 weeks ago
0 likes

I bought a Norbar, came with a calibration certificate, and is a pleasure to use.  It doesn't come with bits, so I got a 1/4" square to hexagonal adaptor that allows me to use any of the bits that I already have.

 

Avatar
KiwiMike [1368 posts] 3 weeks ago
3 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

 If you've wrenched a bit you get to know what works and what doesn't and even with carbon it's not that difficult to judge by feel how much you need to do something up to be secure, safe and not knacker the component.

No, no, no, no, no.

Just....no. 

 

aaahh...no.

 

CDI ran a contest at an Interbike2008, and found 9 out of 10 people asked to tighten a faceplate to 4.5nM were waaaay off, some by 6 times. Park and other brands have done similar, and countless shops have held Friday Evening beers Time contests too - the human hand is simply NOT anywhere near as accurate and consistent as you think.  

Anyone who says their hands are accurate enough...find another mechanic or shop. Seriously. Your hands feel different depending on temperature, fatigue, time of day, whether you've been doing anything hard previously or not...and you then expect to be able to hit a  ***** +/-5% ***** spec? Absolute, total and utter bovine end-product. 

Some products these days have a safety factor of just 10%. That means going to 5 on a 4.5Nm faceplate or stem or whatever could cause the part to fail.

Just no. Buy one. Use one. Use anti-slip. 

If I'm testing a new setup where I'm likely to need to make adjustments mid-ride like to bars or stem, I carry a Silca Torquetube. I like my teeth where they are thanks, and £50 on a decent wrench is cheap for a more-or-less lifetime's assurance. Even if you never get them recalibrated, chances are they won't drift far unless you're an idiot.

Or buy a few of the excellent Prestacycle Torqkeys to suit your bike. They never go out of calibration and you can use them in reverse to loosen bolts. 

20 years ago heavy steel and alloy parts could withstand ham-fistery. Not anymore.