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Riding outdoors makes you happy and healthy

There’s only one place to ride a bicycle and that is outdoors, but through the winter more cyclists have been taking to indoor cycling to avoid the rain and cold. We’re here to remind you of all the benefits of cycling outside. 

We’re sure most of you don’t need us to tell you why cycling outdoors is so much better than indoors cycling, but just in case, here are six reasons.

- 6 reasons why using a home trainer is the best way to get fit over the winter — and how to make it fun too

There’s no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing

Yes, the rain and cold can make facing the outdoors challenging at times. But provided you’ve got the right clothing you can face any weather.

Cycle clothing has come on leaps and bounds in recent years with some big textile developments that make it so much easier to face the rain or cold weather. Waterproof and breathable jackets, waterproof socks, neoprene gloves, soft shell jackets. The Gabba. You don’t even need to spend a fortune either as the quality and performance you can get in clothing that doesn’t break the bank is impressive these days. 

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Cycling outdoors makes you happy

There’s nothing like the feeling of air rushing past your face and the exhilaration from hurtling along a road at high speed to make you feel alive and lift your mood. You don’t get that in a gym that’s for sure. 

According to some research outdoor exercise can be a cure for the seasonal affective disorder that some people suffer from at this time of year when the days are short and the nights long. So that’s a good reason right there for shunning the indoor trainer.

Riding outside is sociable

You can’t ride with friends on an indoor trainer. Though saying that Zwift does allow you to ride with virtual partners. What we mean of course if you can’t go for a ride with a group of friends and have a good old natter, racing each other to the top of each hill and then celebrate with a slab of cake and hot drink. Riding in a group is also safer and you’re more likely to push yourself that little bit harder.

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Cycling is a great sociable activity and it’s one of the big appeals for many cyclists. Doing regular rides with friends is a great motivator as well, especially if you’re feeling a bit lazy or the weather is a bit iffy. No one likes to let a friend down. 

Cold weather helps you burn fat

According to a study cycling in cold weather can promote the growth of brown fat (brown adipose tissue) which burns white fat and can reduce sugar levels. The brown fat consumes a lot of energy producing heat to keep you warm in cold weather and this process can help regulate body weight. So cycling outside in the cold is good for you.

Cycling outdoors is interesting

Who wants to sit on a stationary trainer staring at the wall or trying to distract yourself from the tedium and utter boredom by listening to music and watching television? Not us. Cycling outdoors is infinitely more interesting as you have the beautiful great outdoors, whether country or urban, to enjoy and prevent you ever getting bored. 

The outdoors gives you the chance to enjoy spectacular views, watch the sun rise over the valley, experience the transition from one season to the next, experiences that are far more enjoyable than staying indoors staying at a screen. Plus there's night riding which, provided you're prepared with decent lights, can be hugely enjoyable. 

Plus, not only is riding indoors on a stationary trainer so boring, it 'might' also knacker your bike, as Mat found out when he spoke to a few brands about using carbon bikes in a turbo.

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Outside is free

To borrow the popular #outsideisfree hashtag, cycling outdoors doesn’t cost you anything unlike indoor training which requires an expensive turbo trainer at the very minimum, and a smart trainer and Zwift subscription if you’re really going to invest in cycling indoors. Yes, there will be those rides in the rain, cold wind and snow even, but there’ll also be rides in the sun and it’s those rides that you’ll look forward to and remember fondly. 

What gets you cycling outdoors?

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

65 comments

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davel [2722 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
Mungecrundle wrote:

I think there is a basic psychology involved in going out and facing unpleasant conditions so that when it comes to the day of whatever big challenge you might have set yourself and the weather is less than perfect, you can shrug your shoulders in the knowledge that you have been out in worse.

I definitely put the rides where I've realised I've gone beyond 'chilly' and I'm getting to 'dangerously cold', 30 miles from home, in the 'character building' box. Adds a bit of motivational spice to the home leg. I commute in all weather too and heading home, late, in sleet and a 20mph headwind, can make you wonder why you do it.

Mind you, one of the most bleak, miserable sessions I've had for a long time was a 2 1/2 hour trainerroad do in my garage over Christmas, so they can all count.

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markysd [15 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

Went out and the weekend and, thanks I must admit to a woeful lack of preparedness and unsuitable kit, I could not feel my toes after half an hour. Well, I could but they were painfully numb.  I just kept going as I was just thankful to be outside, away from city roads. The best bit: my drink was ice cold  1 if only that happened in the summer!

i do have a turbo but it's buried somewhere in the shed. 

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Nixster [412 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Came off on ice 6 weeks ago breaking my arm.  Prior to that I was an infrequent turbo user, now I don't have the option. 

I think there is as much mental toughness involved in turbo sessions as there is in riding in the cold, at least for me, keeping going when I'd rather get off.  Haven't got into Zwift though, so maybe that would make it more engaging. 

A 3 degrees and rising policy is going to be my starting point for outdoors from now on, 8 weeks of no outdoor cycling is a high price to pay for watery winter sunshine!

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pdw [68 posts] 2 years ago
3 likes

Most things winter can throw at you can be dealt with the right clothes and a bit of rule 5, and getting out is pretty much always more enjoyable than time on the turbo.   The exception to this is ice.  Ice does not respond well to HTFU.  Nor does it respond to "taking it a bit easy", dropping the pressures a bit, running fatter tyres or even elite bike handling skills.  If you hit black sheet ice, the first you'll know about it is when you hit the tarmac.  It's simple physics: once your front wheel starts to slide, unless you reach the edge of the ice patch, it's only going to get worse.  

When I was young, I parked a car in a ditch after hitting a big patch of ice on a hill.  Even after getting out, the ice was impossible to see yet covered the full width of the road and was difficult to stand up on.

There are three things that ice does respond to: studded tyres, gritting and unpaved surfaces.

Studded tyres work, but the ones I've tried are so draggy as to suck all the fun out of a ride.

Gritting is very effective, and the authorities are actually very good at doing it.  Most councils publish their gritting routes, and in some cases, live information about when they're doing it which can be a very good clue as to whether you should be worried about ice.  Depending on where you are, a route sticking entirely to gritted roads may be very pleasant, or it may be not worth bothering with.

Off road, ice can't form into sheets (except in puddles!), and if everything is properly frozen, you don't even get muddy.

 

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Leodis [428 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

I think its a mixture of both which sees me through winter.  Most of my miles are commuting with club mid week social and an endurance over the weekend but I stop commuting in Oct/Nov by bike as the shorter route just isnt worth the extra faff so I use Zwift.  I am pretty fair weather these days as after a bad off and plate surgery I cant risk further damage so I avoid outdoors if there is a risk of ice.

The good thing about Zwift is you can push yourself further as you don't want the risk of bonking 25 miles from home so you can go deeper into the red.

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Anthony.C [278 posts] 2 years ago
3 likes

I finally cracked and got myself a turbo trainer recently  but I still go out in the cold, like today, which I loved. There is just no comparison, of course it makes you happier to ride outside.  FWIW there are many studies that show that to be the case.

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StraelGuy [1703 posts] 2 years ago
3 likes

Leviathan reminded me of something that puzzles me a lot. As soon as the weather warms up I only wear bib shorts and a t-shirt for cycling and yet even at the height of summer I see people cycling in what looks like their entire cycling wardrobe. Bib tights, long sleeved jackets, shoe covers, the works. The daft sods must be roasting

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MandaiMetric [130 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes
guyrwood wrote:

Leviathan reminded me of something that puzzles me a lot. As soon as the weather warms up I only wear bib shorts and a t-shirt for cycling and yet even at the height of summer I see people cycling in what looks like their entire cycling wardrobe. Bib tights, long sleeved jackets, shoe covers, the works. The daft sods must be roasting

I wear long (sun) sleeves and occasionally long bibs in Singapore (where it is 33C + pretty much 365 days a year). It makes me sweat more, but it saves me from sunburn - I detest sticky sunscreen.

No need for a jacket though, even though we have intense tropical downpours, the rain is warm  1

 

 

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Kendalred [351 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes

As far as this winter has gone, I haven't got the turbo out once - I might just be lucky in that the times I've wanted to ride it's not been icy or wet enough to go to all the trouble of getting it out of the utility room, swapping the wheel over (for the one I use with a turbo tyre on), setting up a table fan, and blocking out half of the kitchen for a couple of hours. I do also find it very tedious, but I will do it if I haven't been outside on the bike for a while - but then again it's not one of these new fangled interactive jobbies that you can use with Zwift, so maybe if it were I might use it more often. I think if I did I might find it a bit addictive!

As for commuting - I think I've done more this winter than I ever have, at least three times per week, which must also point to more favourable conditions. Even when it has been well below zero, it's been dry enough for no (or very little) ice. There was only one day a couple of weeks ago when the council hadn't gritted and really should have - most of the roads, including A roads, were ridiculously icy. So much so that there were a spate of collisions involving cars/vans etc in a very short space of time.

As for the 'should you or shouldn't you' debate - I don't really see the point. If you don't want to go outdoors, that's fine - we're all adults (technically), we don't need to justify our choices in this respect.

 

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VonPinkhoffen [45 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes
arfa wrote:

Providing you stick to the golden rule of mountain biking (trees, don't crash into them) 

 

so THAT's where I've been going wrong! Stupid brown sticky things, getting in my way all the time... 

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davel [2722 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes
Anthony.C wrote:

I finally cracked and got myself a turbo trainer recently  but I still go out in the cold, like today, which I loved. There is just no comparison, of course it makes you happier to ride outside.  FWIW there are many studies that show that to be the case.

I'm a big fan of both for their respective strengths, but I'm a tad skeptical on this particular point.

There are many studies that show cycling outdoors makes you happier than cycling indoors? Is that the case?

I'm not talking general 'outdoor' vs 'indoor' benefits (exposure to sunlight, getting near greenery etc) - are there specific 'cycling (or other exercise) outdoors makes you happier than cycling indoors' studies?

I'm not being a smartarse either - genuinely interested. My time tends to be tight so I do turbo sessions as an efficient way of getting a ride in; I often substitute 60-90 mins of a high-quality turbo session to replace a longer outdoor session. I'm interested if I need to rethink that...

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Bmblbzzz [309 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

Riding and turbo sessions are different things entirely. The first is cycling, the second is going to the gym (without leaving your own home). Really, all of this article after the subheading "Riding outdoors makes you happy and healthy", is restatement in different variations. 

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Danger Dicko [295 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes

I've put my turbo trainer away now that the days are getting longer.

I'd rather be out on my bike.

I do use the Wattbike at the gym if I can't go out.

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john1r1simmons [5 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes

Hi I guess I am the counterpoint. I do cyclocross as the winter gets worse etc and love sliding about and have been happy riding in winter and avoiding Turbo. On 30th Dec I waited till afternoon to go out and for things to thaw. I got caught out riding into bank of freezing fog, suddenly road had black ice end result collar bone broken into 3 bits.

I now own a turbo and am hopping to get back out sometime, but even six weeks on I cannot grip bars, still wearing a sling. And I waited for  the thaw. Honestly I should have been indoors. It happened time to move on, but I am angry at myself.

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cyclesteffer [406 posts] 2 years ago
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I've found a Gravel bike superb for riding through winter - stick dual sided (Flat one side, SPD the other) pedals on, and either 32mm or 35 mm tyres, and managed to commute four days per week all winter.  So far not had to dab a foot down at all cos of ice. But if its less than 2 degrees I will commute in MTB Teva flat shoes. My fitness feels amazing because of being able to keep going all through winter. Previous winters i've used a cyclocross bike, but I think the gravel bike feels more stable in dodgy conditions because of the longer wheelbase. I sold my mountain bike which I used to commute on as the Gravel bike feels even safer.

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verbcrunch [1 post] 2 years ago
1 like

Mountain biking with studded tires when the trails are frozen is otherworldly fun.     If the snow is too deep I ditch the bike for XC skis.      I tend to stay off roads in winter with any bike I value because of the salt.      

I've never owned an indoor trainer so I have no idea what I'm missing.      

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StraelGuy [1703 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes

Nobody's mentioned the other benefit of winter cycling. My steel winter bike weighs a few kilo's more than my carbon summer bike so I inadvertently get more training in during the winter.

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alansmurphy [2245 posts] 2 years ago
4 likes

Unconstituted, whilst we are on the subject of guff:

 

1. Indoor cycling is as sociable as outdoor group rides - people on Zwift chat using VOIP, form supportive communities and race tactically together... I think that's because Zwift and similar apps attract a lot of progressive minded riders, who tend to be outgoing and friendly.

 

Ahhh some of my bestest friends have no faces too - must be nice for you to self categorise yourself as progressive and friendly. Will pop along for a chat about FTP, WPK and the best excel sheet to monitor your cadence.

 

2. Riding in a group outdoors pushes you harder? It can push you hard, but most people will likely never find any group ride outdoors that kill have you throwing up as you pass the lamp post. In Zwift, races are hell, and people who will never race hard in real life for many reasons will get to experience dark places that the road outside never will.

 

You can ride slow on Zwift too right?

 

3. Cold weather burns more fat - pretty sure this nonsense makes absolutely zero difference to some guy who does a handful of 0 degree rides for a few hours at a time. Shameful guff. 

 

It makes a diference, 0.00000000001% is a difference - don't let your ranting get in the way of fact.

 

4. Spectactular views - sure, most people just have spectacular views within reach of their doorstep?  And even if they did, diminishing returns and having to keep your eye on the road means you only really get the occassional feeling of satisfaction from it. If you really want this sort of experience you go hiking, or climb a mountain on your bike in Europe where the low speed means you can take it in.

 

Er... Yes. I challenge you to ride 10 miles from your house and not see something of interest to look at. Let's face it, 2 pigeons fighting over a chip beats the 'feature wall' mosaic paper the Missus made you buy. I can't actually believe you think there is only option a. Your wall or b. A beautiful mountain pass.

 

5. Cycling outdoors is interesting - no it's now. You pedal your bike. What's remotely interesting about that unless you're on some technical descent? New things are interesting. Trying new indoor trainer software and racing on it is way more interesting that riding along crappy roads in gray weather.

 

But it is - see just as valid an argument as your "no it's now" (sic). If you are unsure about what is interesting about pedalling your bike then you may be on the wrong website. Trying new software is interesting - did your VOIP progressive friends tell you this? I mean I get excited by the super oled retina 4k screen on a phone as much as the next geek but is it as interesting as trying to hold a bend that you've taken a little too quickly?

 

6. Making you happier - more guff - how many hours would a rider have to ride and what times of the day would they need to ride at to relieve to what extent SAD? ... If you want some sort of happiness boost, use achievement - train smart, lose weight

 

For me, 1hr52 minutes last night, made me happier than watching Hollyoaks. Train smart and lose weight, they are your goals, why the hell should I be interested in them?

 

"Can't believe I got baited by this rubbish but oh well".

 

Seconded.

 

"proper training gets done in a controlled, structured way - and for the modern cyclist, that means getting your act together, stop making excuses and getting on a trainer to do the work"

 

No it doesn't, you are confusing your opinion with fact again.

 

 

 

 

 

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tritecommentbot [2266 posts] 2 years ago
3 likes
alansmurphy wrote:

Unconstituted, whilst we are on the subject of guff:

 

1. Indoor cycling is as sociable as outdoor group rides - people on Zwift chat using VOIP, form supportive communities and race tactically together... I think that's because Zwift and similar apps attract a lot of progressive minded riders, who tend to be outgoing and friendly.

 

Ahhh some of my bestest friends have no faces too - must be nice for you to self categorise yourself as progressive and friendly. Will pop along for a chat about FTP, WPK and the best excel sheet to monitor your cadence.

 

2. Riding in a group outdoors pushes you harder? It can push you hard, but most people will likely never find any group ride outdoors that kill have you throwing up as you pass the lamp post. In Zwift, races are hell, and people who will never race hard in real life for many reasons will get to experience dark places that the road outside never will.

 

You can ride slow on Zwift too right?

 

3. Cold weather burns more fat - pretty sure this nonsense makes absolutely zero difference to some guy who does a handful of 0 degree rides for a few hours at a time. Shameful guff. 

 

It makes a diference, 0.00000000001% is a difference - don't let your ranting get in the way of fact.

 

4. Spectactular views - sure, most people just have spectacular views within reach of their doorstep?  And even if they did, diminishing returns and having to keep your eye on the road means you only really get the occassional feeling of satisfaction from it. If you really want this sort of experience you go hiking, or climb a mountain on your bike in Europe where the low speed means you can take it in.

 

Er... Yes. I challenge you to ride 10 miles from your house and not see something of interest to look at. Let's face it, 2 pigeons fighting over a chip beats the 'feature wall' mosaic paper the Missus made you buy. I can't actually believe you think there is only option a. Your wall or b. A beautiful mountain pass.

 

5. Cycling outdoors is interesting - no it's now. You pedal your bike. What's remotely interesting about that unless you're on some technical descent? New things are interesting. Trying new indoor trainer software and racing on it is way more interesting that riding along crappy roads in gray weather.

 

But it is - see just as valid an argument as your "no it's now" (sic). If you are unsure about what is interesting about pedalling your bike then you may be on the wrong website. Trying new software is interesting - did your VOIP progressive friends tell you this? I mean I get excited by the super oled retina 4k screen on a phone as much as the next geek but is it as interesting as trying to hold a bend that you've taken a little too quickly?

 

6. Making you happier - more guff - how many hours would a rider have to ride and what times of the day would they need to ride at to relieve to what extent SAD? ... If you want some sort of happiness boost, use achievement - train smart, lose weight

 

For me, 1hr52 minutes last night, made me happier than watching Hollyoaks. Train smart and lose weight, they are your goals, why the hell should I be interested in them?

 

"Can't believe I got baited by this rubbish but oh well".

 

Seconded.

 

"proper training gets done in a controlled, structured way - and for the modern cyclist, that means getting your act together, stop making excuses and getting on a trainer to do the work"

 

No it doesn't, you are confusing your opinion with fact again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not a single solid point in there. Anecdote, semantics, and the usual irate have-a-go nonsense. Apparently structured training is 'opinion'.

Bit cringe actually cheeky

 

Take it up with your wife, maybe she'll nod in agreement to this balls. 

 

 

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alansmurphy [2245 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes

Again the "not a single solid point in there" is massively applicable to your heartfelt "usual irate have-a-go nonsense".

 

Are Zwift riders more sociable - I assume you have done extensive research?

 

You talk about "most people" but then just state a somewhat narrow minded opinion - sample of one!

 

"Spectactular views - sure, most people" again, you may live somewhere dull, your view of what is in reach of the doorstep may be tiny (with all your structured training I'm sure you could find somewhere nice) but spectacular is subjective. I saw a spectacular sunset across a Cheshire field last night...

 

I tried to read your rant objectively, you have every right to question the opinion piece of the article, equally your opinion can be challenged. The fact that you automatically find this cringeworthy suggests you only really value your own opinion, bit strange then that you engage in comments sections of online articles... 

 

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PotholeHeaven [4 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

Both have benefits really..

 

 

 

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tritecommentbot [2266 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

Okay alan, I'm sorry.

Everyone's glad that you had a spectacular sunset across Cheshire last night and that means that spectacular views are within most riders' distances from home. This is not anecdote, this is fact. And that sunset was definitely spectactular. Even better than double rainbow.

And yes, local club rides meet up more than Zwift clubs per week do. Chat more often too. Alan knows this because he's a Zwift regular and local club hero, so he can compare!

Anyway, lets all meet up for a ride this weekend and cure SAD and you can impress us with your 25% FTP gain from all those unstructured rides.

 

 

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alansmurphy [2245 posts] 2 years ago
4 likes

Your sarcasm is actually more reasoned than your rants.

Indeed, you're arguing against your original rant. I may have found a sunset spectacular, you may not, it's subjective. As are the other points you made, but you present them as fact.

I didn't state who met up more or less, who were more or less sociable - you did!

And no, I wouldn't know whether my FTP had increased because I'm too busy out on my bike and enjoying myself. I'm getting quicker, the weight is improving, bike handling is imrpoving and I'm having a laugh with my mates. They are my aims and they are being met mainly outdoors with the odd 20 miles on a turbo.

"Both have benefits really"

This.

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Richktm [3 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

Hello

I agree to all of the points mentioned..riding is great et all

 

The reality is a bit different in Montreal...we just got hit with 30c of snow..and another 10cm is comming. When you add the cold cold weather..the clothing will not help.. we are not talking minus one here..minus 15 with windchill factor

 

most of the bikes will not work..the derailleurs will freeze..the tires are too narrow..except for a fatbike.

this, great article..but taking the chance of being in a wheelchair for the rest of my life for the fun of riding in winter in montreal..nope. I'll stick to indoor training with peloton.

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ianrparsons [18 posts] 2 years ago
1 like

Lucky chap who rides in 4 centigrade withour gloves! Us type 2 diabetics need the gloves as our circulation is limited by the disease. BTW genetic cause not obesity or lifestyle! Lots of layers including the feet too!

 

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matthewn5 [1372 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
unconstituted wrote:

I do both. I'm probably in the 'hardcore' camp - I'll take the bike out in the ice and grin at every save from either the back or front wheel giving out. Also find riding in pissing rain one of the greatest pleasures I've ever known, for some reason it's again - instantly grin inducing. Is any part of that smart? No. Do I get as much benefit as I would have from doing an indoor session? Of course not, you can't go hard in bad conditions. 

That said, fair amount of small-minded, ill-informed nonsense being spouted in the article above. Too much to go through them all, but the most important ones.

1. Indoor cycling is as sociable as outdoor group rides - people on Zwift chat using VOIP, form supportive communities and race tactically together. They do this more far more regularly than outdoor groups. Some 3 times a week. Some several times a day. This is fact and something that surprised me when starting Zwift. People are warm and friendly, you'll get warm hearted messages from people you don't know. It's great and something that you don't get much of outdoors. I think that's because Zwift and similar apps attract a lot of progressive minded riders, who tend to be outgoing and friendly.

2. Riding in a group outdoors pushes you harder? It can push you hard, but most people will likely never find any group ride outdoors that kill have you throwing up as you pass the lamp post. In Zwift, races are hell, and people who will never race hard in real life for many reasons will get to experience dark places that the road outside never will.

3. Cold weather burns more fat - pretty sure this nonsense makes absolutely zero difference to some guy who does a handful of 0 degree rides for a few hours at a time. Shameful guff.

4. Spectactular views - sure, most people just have spectacular views within reach of their doorstep?  And even if they did, diminishing returns and having to keep your eye on the road means you only really get the occassional feeling of satisfaction from it. If you really want this sort of experience you go hiking, or climb a mountain on your bike in Europe where the low speed means you can take it in. Rest of us get a few green fields to bore us while dodging potholes, while you know, actually putting some pace on it.

5. Cycling outdoors is interesting - no it's now. You pedal your bike. What's remotely interesting about that unless you're on some technical descent? New things are interesting. Trying new indoor trainer software and racing on it is way more interesting that riding along crappy roads in gray weather, which yes, doesn't make you happier by the way - positive ions, if you believe the sicence stuff - makes you feel negative.

6. Making you happier - more guff - how many hours would a rider have to ride and what times of the day would they need to ride at to relieve to what extent SAD? You could be out all day, every day and still have shit vitamin D production in the UK in winter.  If you want some sort of happiness boost, use achievement - train smart, lose weight and that'll keep you ticking along until the weather is better. Plan a holiday abroad to use your winter fitness on - things to look forward to.

Can't believe I got baited by this rubbish but oh well. CXR said it all aready anyway - proper training gets done in a controlled, structured way - and for the modern cyclist, that means getting your act together, stop making excuses and getting on a trainer to do the work.

Where's the fun in that life?

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SingleSpeed [429 posts] 2 years ago
1 like
drosco wrote:

Why does everyone have to make cycling so macho?.

 

 

Because we are harder than you?

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davel [2722 posts] 2 years ago
2 likes
SingleSpeed wrote:
drosco wrote:

Why does everyone have to make cycling so macho?.

 

 

Because we are harder than you?

'hard' is often misquoted in relation to cycling: I used to think it was ironic, but people really mean it.

There's a certain amount of fortitude required to put all the lonely hours in, but only on a par with endurance running, and loads of other sports, plenty of which also result in exposure to hurt, elements, mud, and proper physical contact. Yet it's cycling with the 'hardmen' bollocks.

Out of the sports I've done, cycling has the greatest collection of picked-last-in-PE types who struggle to lift their own arms up, which is fine, but let's knock the 'hard' stuff on the head. Methinks its adherents protest too much.

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6F2 [13 posts] 2 years ago
0 likes
alansmurphy wrote:

Unconstituted, whilst we are on the subject of guff:

 

1. Indoor cycling is as sociable as outdoor group rides - people on Zwift chat using VOIP, form supportive communities and race tactically together... I think that's because Zwift and similar apps attract a lot of progressive minded riders, who tend to be outgoing and friendly.

 

Ahhh some of my bestest friends have no faces too - must be nice for you to self categorise yourself as progressive and friendly. Will pop along for a chat about FTP, WPK and the best excel sheet to monitor your cadence.

 

2. Riding in a group outdoors pushes you harder? It can push you hard, but most people will likely never find any group ride outdoors that kill have you throwing up as you pass the lamp post. In Zwift, races are hell, and people who will never race hard in real life for many reasons will get to experience dark places that the road outside never will.

 

You can ride slow on Zwift too right?

 

3. Cold weather burns more fat - pretty sure this nonsense makes absolutely zero difference to some guy who does a handful of 0 degree rides for a few hours at a time. Shameful guff. 

 

It makes a diference, 0.00000000001% is a difference - don't let your ranting get in the way of fact.

 

4. Spectactular views - sure, most people just have spectacular views within reach of their doorstep?  And even if they did, diminishing returns and having to keep your eye on the road means you only really get the occassional feeling of satisfaction from it. If you really want this sort of experience you go hiking, or climb a mountain on your bike in Europe where the low speed means you can take it in.

 

Er... Yes. I challenge you to ride 10 miles from your house and not see something of interest to look at. Let's face it, 2 pigeons fighting over a chip beats the 'feature wall' mosaic paper the Missus made you buy. I can't actually believe you think there is only option a. Your wall or b. A beautiful mountain pass.

 

5. Cycling outdoors is interesting - no it's now. You pedal your bike. What's remotely interesting about that unless you're on some technical descent? New things are interesting. Trying new indoor trainer software and racing on it is way more interesting that riding along crappy roads in gray weather.

 

But it is - see just as valid an argument as your "no it's now" (sic). If you are unsure about what is interesting about pedalling your bike then you may be on the wrong website. Trying new software is interesting - did your VOIP progressive friends tell you this? I mean I get excited by the super oled retina 4k screen on a phone as much as the next geek but is it as interesting as trying to hold a bend that you've taken a little too quickly?

 

6. Making you happier - more guff - how many hours would a rider have to ride and what times of the day would they need to ride at to relieve to what extent SAD? ... If you want some sort of happiness boost, use achievement - train smart, lose weight

 

For me, 1hr52 minutes last night, made me happier than watching Hollyoaks. Train smart and lose weight, they are your goals, why the hell should I be interested in them?

 

"Can't believe I got baited by this rubbish but oh well".

 

Seconded.

 

"proper training gets done in a controlled, structured way - and for the modern cyclist, that means getting your act together, stop making excuses and getting on a trainer to do the work"

 

No it doesn't, you are confusing your opinion with fact again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

"2 pigeons fighting over a chip beats the 'feature wall' mosaic paper the Missus made you buy" I think you're underestimating the quality of our feature wall, it is truly a thing of beauty.

 

Avatar
Nick T [1287 posts] 1 year ago
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"There’s only one place to ride a bicycle and that is outdoors"

 

and the velodrome 

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