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Did you know that 75% of cyclists are male? 

Cycling provides an opportunity to substitute the car for a healthier option. It doesn't require fuel, it contributes to an active healthy lifestyle, and saves reduces the huge air pollution problem in the UK.

I am trying to investigate why the gender imbalance exists in cycling in the UK, as in countries such as Germany and The Netherlands women cycle as much as men; furthermore, cycling is a popular mode of transport in these countries.

So what do you think are the main reasons behind this? Some contributing factors that have emerged in my research are;
 

Harrasment (verbal abuse, funny looks, sexual harrasment)
Lack of confidence
Fear of traffic
Not wanting to break a sweat / potentially mess your hair etc
Distance
Weather
Lack of cycle lanes
hills
Not knowing enough about bicycle maintence
Bikes are too expensive, not sure where to get a 2nd hand one

Would love to hear your views, please feel free to reply, the more detail the better!

Hopefully my research can contribute to achieving a gender parity in UK cycling!

Best wishes,

George
University of Manchester

66 comments

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Watty650 [8 posts] 10 months ago
2 likes

I'm a female and I cycle for fitness.  I was late to the party, only starting in my 40's and starting off at a very low fitness level.  Luckily i found Breeze rides whihc has helped me progress & I now cycle with a number of mixed local cycling groups & I am a Breeze leader.

Of your list 

Harrasment (verbal abuse, funny looks, sexual harrasment)

I have been shouted at and abused by passing car drivers, but I can usually hold my own and luckily they have never stopped, plus I am told in certain circumstances I can be a little scary.

I do though sometimes worry about being in remote places on my own on a bike ride but that's because i watch too many murder mysteries

Lack of confidence

As a female I do worry about rocking up to join a new group, particularly a mixed group.  Usually I worry about being fast enough & getting dropped, especially if i don't know the area or causing some inconvienience & holding the group up.

Some groups also do not encourage women.  A club local to me advertises their "beginner" rides as 17-18mph average.  Too fast for most beginner women to manage & a number of men I would imagine

Fear of traffic

I can't say i'm keen on traffic, but it's not really put me off.  I try to be sensible, i wouldn't cycle down a major A roads if i can avoid it & if it is busy i'd use a cycle path if there was one available, but is that gender related or just general common sense?

Not wanting to break a sweat / potentially mess your hair etc

That's not gender specific, it's person. Some people worry about these things, some don't.  Personally i'm usually covered in snot & oil within 10 minutes & am passed caring.

Distance

Again depends on the person, women tend to have better stamina than men so distance isn't really a problem when we get going.  I'm training for ride london so for me i wouldn't bother to turn up for rides less than 50 miles.

One consideration that may not have been mentioned is that the majority of Breeze rides are restricted to 50 miles or less, unless the leader has been on a level 2 training course.  This can resstrict the distances alot of women are offered on group rides. 

Weather

I won't go out in ice, but again is that gender or just sensible., as i can't really afford a broken bone. I will though use my turbo if i can't get out, that's partly why i have one.

Lack of cycle lanes

Not a problem where i am as i live on a sustrans route & in quite a rural setting.  

hills

I can't say I like them, and I'm not the fastest up them, but i have passed a number of men pushing their bikes up.  All I ask is if you get off, pull to the side of the road & when pushing don't walk in the middle of the road.

 
Not knowing enough about bicycle maintence

Again that could be anyone, regardless of gender.  My other half doesn't know one groupset from another, where as i like to research everything about the bikes i purchase. i regularly read this forum, a number of bike magazines. 

I can't strip down my bike but i can fix a puncture if I'm out, have the number of my local bike shop on speed dial & i have breakdown insurance if I'm totally stuck on a ride.  

Bikes are too expensive, not sure where to get a 2nd hand one

Rubbish again, not gender specific. My other half tries to limit me to 3 bikes.  I have 5 with nothing less than ultegra, and I have the gadgets to go with them.  this depends on the person & if they like "stuff" and have the means to buy it.

What i have found though, is bike shops can make assumptions.  They see a female & see lower spec and talk to you accordingly.  If i have this situation i take my custom elsewhere & tell all my female cycling friends, conversely I also tell them if the cycle shop staff are helpful & non judgmental.

 

 

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PRSboy [470 posts] 10 months ago
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ManchesterRider wrote:
bikerchickie wrote:

Not wanting to break a sweat / potentially mess your hair etc
Bwuahahahaha. I'm not even going to dignify that with an answer. Isn't that why showers were invented?

 

 

Hi,

this came up frequently with fellow students, 'concerns over appearence' were cited frequently. Which is why I included it.

 

Also, my office building does not have a shower facility.  This makes it impractical for me to regularly cycle a hilly 16 miles (though I'm a bloke not a woman, but the point still stands), so its back to the infrastructure point.

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Kapelmuur [456 posts] 10 months ago
1 like

My 17 year old granddaughter is a dancer, a competition ice skater  and she is goes to a gym for strength and flexibiliy training for skating, so I asked her whether she would consider cycling.

She said that she would cycle but she's scared of traffic and that's what puts her off the most.

She also made the point that no girls she knows cycle and that it would be wierd to be the only one who does.   She said that it's easier for boys to continue to ride to school as they don't have to wear skirts.

Finally, she enjoys the social side of skating (she's in a team) and dancing and doesn't see cycling as a sociable activity. 

 

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webcrest [7 posts] 10 months ago
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I think many women don't use their cycle for everyday journeys because they can't carry stuff on cycle like  shopping bags , multiple things etc and some one want to build a child seat on cyclic.
i think required more publicity about how to make bicycles useful in everyday life?

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Mungecrundle [1360 posts] 10 months ago
1 like

Depends on what kind of cycling you wish to encourage; Commuting, shopping / local journeys, sport and recreation.

From random conversations over the years with the tiny demographic of women who would speak with me I would cite, as genuine concerns, lack of confidence in actually riding a bike, usually as a result of not cycling as a child, usually due to parental fears over road safety. And leading from that, lack of safe cycling infrasture at critical points. E.g a single scarey roundabout can make an otherwise simple commute a no go.

After that the excuses become more of a veneer over simply not wanting to make an effort or being put to any discomfort over the cocooned space of the car.

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rebeccarrgghh [7 posts] 10 months ago
3 likes

I’m female and have cycled for the last 8 years. I commute all year, all weathers, long road rides on the weekends, cycle tour during warmer months and use bike paths/bridle ways for after work bimbles so that covers a bit I think. I don’t drive.

 

I actually think I get less harassed being female, I think there was a study about the “pony tail effect” but I don’t feel that I’m more harassed being a woman. But you do have altercations and I can give it back too! Some Chavs on the cycle path wolf whistle at me on the way back home but they always clear out of the way and don’t give me bother so who cares?

It’s hard for me to remember how intimidating it was when I first started, sure I used to ride too far to the side and all that. I got stuck in fast, cleats on first ride on road bike and subsequent hilarious falls didn’t seem to dent me. I was scared though but I just did it, I wanted to.

Traffic is not great, will always avoid/minimise horrible roads/roundabouts. This definitely puts women off, so many people (male &female) tell me I’m “brave” which tells you how they feel about things.

I actually cycled for fitness before I became a hardcore commuter. For trivial reasons like the fact I used to straighten my hair every morning haha! I don’t now! I mean I’m no Kim Kardashian but at first changing in a toilet cubicle and trying to sort appearance was a bit daunting. I don’t mean to say women are frivolous or overly vain but you can look pretty disheveled after riding into headwind in rain, red faced, snotty, sweaty! There is no place where I can plug in a hair dryer in my office for a quick blast so I just have to take the hit on appearance.

Well if you live 20 miles away from your work and you don’t already cycle you aren’t just going to suddenly ride in tomorrow- man or woman. Lots of people live very very close though. People drive into work who live less than a mile away. What can you do about those people? If I had to ride 15 miles each way for work that would be around my cut off I reckon. It would depend on the roads again though. If they were brutal, busy then no. A male friend gave up his longer commute after just having too many horrible NDE’s.

Weather is weather, its hardly ever too bad. Britain is a temperate country. Get some waterproofs, ride in the wind it makes you stronger! Got some spiked tyres this year for ice, they’re great. Even in Holland cycling heaven its windy as hell and rainy.

Cycle lanes are a joke full of pedestrians and cars usually. A load of useless ones have sprung up near me and I’ve had had incidents with cars already on them. Usually an afterthought that can lead you into bad road positioning that you’d otherwise avoid, plonk you out into traffic that is not expecting you. I would not rely on these alone-do a Bikeability course as well. These helped my male partner with confidence and good road positioning.

I like hills, lower gearing helps loads, I’m not fast but enjoy the challenge and find flat routes boring. I also seek out some on the way home from work as every little helps. Its hard but that’s sort of the point, you do get better.

I did a bike maintenance class a few months into riding as it did worry me that besides changing punctures I knew eff all about the bike. It’s rewarding knowing how to do some things for you self.. I see women only maintenance classes advertised now, when I did mine I was the only woman which might make some feel self-conscious. I built up a very nice track bike and I can now choose framesets and parts and swap bits round.

Cycling can be as expensive or as inexpensive as you’d like it to be. The Bike 2 work scheme is a good starting point, most workplaces offer it, to women as well as men! Certainly cheaper than driving and its cheaper for a bike to work scheme monthly payment than a two zone monthly bus pass where I live. I figure I don’t drive so I can spend it on posh bikes and jerseys. I’d want to either know about cycling or have a mate who did before buying second hand in case it was trashed/nicked.

Somebody above mentioned carrying things which is true if you are wanting to pick up groceries etc. My commuter has front and rear racks, I carried an huge amount of stuff home on it last night, having a useful bike is useful!

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timtak [66 posts] 10 months ago
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Women have a vagina. Cutting to the chase.

Perhaps the most important thing about improving cycling speed is to get into more aerodynamic torso-horizontal form so that your chest is not acting as a drag racing parachute to the wind.
Cycling is about form. Good form is possible, if you have a very bendy back, to sit on your bottom and curl the top of your back over to get into an aerodynamic position, but by far the easiest way to get long and low is pivot around so that you are sitting on the place were, whatever sex you are, your bits, gonads (?), sex organs are.

I think that hollow saddles can solve the pressure issues that arise but not everyone knows about, or at least uses hollow saddles, and most new bikes do not come with hollow saddles as standard. When women get to know about hollow saddles, they may be more into road cycling since supporting oneself  with that area of the body is even more fraught for them than it is for us, in my humble opinion, without first hand knowledge.

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alanngarethh [1 post] 10 months ago
2 likes

Women like to talk. (joke)

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MsG [1 post] 10 months ago
2 likes

Timtak I think you mean vulva - the external genitalia? I agree more information available for women that there are different designs of saddles available could help.

I've cycled for the last 2.5 years, been a runner for 5 years. Late starter with cycling (in my 40s). 

I started cycling because I wanted to try and do a bike commute, and also because I enjoy exploring and you can cover more miles on a bike! Helmut hair doesn't bother me, and I do have long hair.

I commute  in most weathers (not ice) and do a commute twice a week which is 18 miles each way. When the evenings get lighter then I add on to the journey back to 25-30 miles if possible.

The commute is on rural roads that aren't really busy but the traffic is moving faster (40+mph) than in a town. There's no street lighting either so had a bit of trial and error with getting a suitable light. The roads are in very poor condition, lots of potholes.

What puts me off? Well the same as what actually stops my DH from cycling - idiot drivers! He's very nervous and after some close encounters he's very reluctant to go out now.

I try not to let it bother me but sometimes it does get to you. I loathe roundabouts, people round here seem to treat stopping at them as optional. I hate shared use cycle paths, as others have written, the users behave unpredictably. I end up cycling so slowly to allow time for avoidance/braking etc that I prefer to take my chances with the road.

 

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matthewn5 [1314 posts] 9 months ago
5 likes
ConcordeCX wrote:

It seems to me that this is the wrong place to ask this question. First, it's predominantly men, second the women here do cycle. You should be asking the women who don't cycle, and they're probably not reading this site.

THIS

If you're really doing university research, with all due respect, I wouldnt start here. Have a look at Rachel Aldred's excellent work, look at her methodology, and try reproducing elements of that.

My OH commutes from London to Hatfield. It would a 5 minute cycle to the station, but the traffic around the station is hideous, and the station crowded and awkward even as a pedestrian. She'd have to carry the bike up stairs, onto a train with no cycle spaces, then carry it over the bridge at Hatfield (there are at least lifts there). But the real problem is cycling from Hatfield station to her office: the New Town has been laid out for the convenience of motor cars, with fast dual carriageways everywhere, and although there are cycle tracks (divided pavements, essentially), the routes are indirect, interrupted and awkward.

She likes coming out for a ride into town on a Sunday, loved the new segregated cycleways and cycles happily when she's not being intimidated by drivers. But useful segregated tracks are rare in this country....

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Bier25 [2 posts] 9 months ago
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Perhaps a small part of the reason is that women are more willing to practice yoga?

 

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CygnusX1 [1135 posts] 9 months ago
2 likes
Bier25 wrote:

Perhaps a small part of the reason is that women are more willing to practice yoga?

Please explain yourself, otherwise that seems like a facile sexist stereotype.

I will give you the benefit of the doubt, and argue that propensity to engage in one activity (yoga) may well bear a rough inverse correlation to propensity to engage in another (cycling), but that doesn't mean they are causative.

However, digging a little deeper, one reason why women may not cycle but  do practice yoga is that the cycling can feel threatening and unsafe, whereas yoga doesn't - but this reason was already covered on the survey.

A more interesting question is, why don't more men practice yoga? 

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Lydia-Hines [7 posts] 9 months ago
1 like

Maybe in many cases it's just a simple thing like "I've got a car". That's one purchase that stops a lot of people from cycling.

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LastBoyScout [552 posts] 9 months ago
1 like

Update.

My wife has started cycling a bit more - brand new car got doored in the car park of the toddler dance class, so she's now cycling there to prevent a recurrence. Little one absolutely loves it and wants to go further.

My sister has considered cycle commuting, but ongoing treatment for a sciatic nerve problem is putting her off at the moment.

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don simon fbpe [2937 posts] 9 months ago
2 likes

Well, that escalated rather quickly.

Shovel it was then.

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Stratman [164 posts] 9 months ago
3 likes

I wonder if there’s also something more general about the distances folks traveL to work.  I grew up near Blackpool, and my Mum taught in a local secondary school.  She can’t drive, and so cycled every day, in ordinary clothes on a bike like a Raleigh Shopper, with a basket on the front.  The total distance would have  been a couple of miles, and so she didn’t worry about the issues mentioned.

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yupiteru [51 posts] 9 months ago
1 like

I am a man and comments I've had from the women in work when I have cycled to work include:

Doesnt it make you sweaty?

Doesnt it make you tired?

Doesnt it spoil your hair?

I would be scared of the traffic.

 

Also I was on the side of the road for Velothon Wales 2018 last Sunday for a good 5hrs and noticed that most  entrants were young white males but the number of female riders seemed higher this year, some obviously entered as a group or team.  Good to see more women taking part.

Strange though that there were very few black male cyclists that passed me and I didnt see any black women for some reason?

I have noticed more women out on the road around here (s Wales) in recent times, some cycling on their own which is not something I would have notices a few years ago.

I have 2 teenage daughters who both have bikes and as we live right next to NCN 4 will cycle on there but they dont like the traffic.  Oh and I have bought them helmets but leave it to them to decide whether to wear them or not and they dont normaly bother mainly because they dont want to spoil their hair. 

I dont want to start a helmet debate but I personally feel that the excercise benefits they get far outweigh the head injury risk.

Cant blame then staying off the road though there are some right arsehole drivers around.

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OldRidgeback [3093 posts] 9 months ago
1 like
yupiteru wrote:

I am a man and comments I've had from the women in work when I have cycled to work include:

Doesnt it make you sweaty?

Doesnt it make you tired?

Doesnt it spoil your hair?

I would be scared of the traffic.

 

Also I was on the side of the road for Velothon Wales 2018 last Sunday for a good 5hrs and noticed that most  entrants were young white males but the number of female riders seemed higher this year, some obviously entered as a group or team.  Good to see more women taking part.

Strange though that there were very few black male cyclists that passed me and I didnt see any black women for some reason?

I have noticed more women out on the road around here (s Wales) in recent times, some cycling on their own which is not something I would have notices a few years ago.

I have 2 teenage daughters who both have bikes and as we live right next to NCN 4 will cycle on there but they dont like the traffic.  Oh and I have bought them helmets but leave it to them to decide whether to wear them or not and they dont normaly bother mainly because they dont want to spoil their hair. 

I dont want to start a helmet debate but I personally feel that the excercise benefits they get far outweigh the head injury risk.

Cant blame then staying off the road though there are some right arsehole drivers around.

 

My wife cycles to and from work on a regular basis. She does this even more frequently since she got a new bike to replace her ageing Specialized MTB, which had a few issues. She's not a quick rider but enjoys bimbling along at steady speeds. I do notice a lot more woman riders in London now, some with full-on roadie gear and those with Pashleys at the other end of the scale.

Where I live in S London there are a lot of black male cyclists on the usual array of bike types (but MTBs and hybrids seem more common), but not many black female cyclists I agree.

 

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yupiteru [51 posts] 9 months ago
1 like

Well I have just contacted TDL Event Services and they say that around 1000 women took part in the Velothon Wales event, over all 3 distances - I think the total was about 8000 riders.

Spoke to my teenage daughters and they thought that the Velothon was a race and didnt realise you could just pay and enter and I think this is part of the problem.  Its an image thing, most of the cyclist around here are young men on racing bikes with racing gear on, same as the Velothon and no doubt the same country wide.  Women see it as a sporting endeavour.

Managed to persuade a woman neighbour to borrow her daughters mtb and come cycle camping with a few of us a couple of years back - she wasnt that keen on the cycling side of it but she did like sitting around the campfire getting pissed in the evening.  Problem was, she had a weak bladder and anyone who shared her tent would wake up soaked in her urine - how we laughed.  Thankfully she has moved.

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fatsmoker [35 posts] 9 months ago
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For my wife, who won't commute 6 miles now, all of those below, linked into ones which are similar.  She lacks confidence because of traffic because there are poor cycle lanes.  Hills cause sweat. 

Lack of confidence / Fear of traffic / Lack of cycle lanes
Not wanting to break a sweat / hills

potentially mess your hair etc
Weather
Not knowing enough about bicycle maintence

She will happily go out with me and the kids on a leisure ride as long as it's not too hilly. 

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Moonboots [2 posts] 9 months ago
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I strongly suggest you go over the Pennines and talk to Queensbury Queens of the Mountain CC. They know a thing about getting women cycling and the things that stop them. They are are a club for all abilities and will probably have most of the answers you are seeking...

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Legs_Eleven_Wor... [559 posts] 9 months ago
1 like

Well, this won't make me very popular, but then you've probably understood that that doesn't bother me.   The proportion of women involved in accidents almost certainly dissuades them from getting on the road, and that is a genuine shame.   Unfortunately for the crew-cuts over at the Guardian, this over-representation has nothing to do with nasty behaviour on the part of heterosexual white men, and a lot to do with the fact that women have shit road sense.  

On every commute into London, and on every commute home, I will see the following at least once: 

1.  at the ASL, someone will stop far over to the right well forward into the ASL.  Well, that's OK right?  Except that that person will be the slowest rider and when the lights change to green, the faster riders are forced either to undertake - which is dangerous, stupid and potentially actionable in case of collision - or else to sit patiently behind that rider either until that rider moves further across to the left of lane 1, or else a gap opens in lane 2 (which is generally filled with motor vehicles doing => 150% of the posted speed limit).  

2.  When riding slowly, another rider will shoot past me on the left, in a gap which may be no more than an inch or two wider on each side, than the rider's handlebars.  The most outstanding - that is to say, egregious - example of this was last month, as I was coming up Tooley Street where it becomes Duke Street Hill.  The road was pretty busy, and traffic was at a standstill all the way down to the entrance to the posh shops on the riverside.  As I was coming up, a car was waiting to pull out from Tooley Street, indicating right to go up Duke Street Hill, so I slowed as I couldn't get past safely.  On my left was a small van - Transit size and at no more than five or six feet from my elbow.  Suddenly, 'out of nowhere', appeared a cyclist on my left, squeezed between me, right shoulder brushing my left elbow, and then tottering up Duke Street Hill.  

3.  Pulling out without looking.  There I am, cycling along at (depending on how knackered I am) 13-25 mph in a bus lane.  There's a bus stopped ahead of me, so I'll do the ol' lifesaver thing and glance over my right shoulder and start to pull into the next 'live' lane, if it's free.  Ahead of me will be another cyclist - closer to the bus but going more slowly.  As I'm about 20 feet behind the bus and aiming to pass it on the right, this cyclist will - without a single effing glance over the shoulder and without signalling, pull right out into my path.   

And almost every single time that I witness the above behaviour, it is exhibited by a female rider.  Not exclusively, of course.  A lot of men ride like utter twats, too.  But almost every time, it's a female.  In the third one I have mentioned, I remember on one occasion, exasperated by this behaviour, I said, 'next time, try looking!' as I swerved out to pass.  'I did!' she responded.  Well, she didn't, because I would have seen her head turn (and I watched my helmet cam footage later on and confirmed: she had not looked) - but even if she were not lying, claiming that she had in fact seen me but decided nonetheless to pull into the path of another vehicle, sort of explains why so many of them are being mown down.  

Now, it goes without saying that it's no less a tragedy when a rider is killed, and if a car driver does something twattish and/or illegal, then he or she should be hammered and never let behind the wheel of a car again.   But considering that men ride a lot faster and (admittedly) take a lot more risks - not forgetting the fact that there are more of us - trying to explain away the gender disparity in accident statistics by 'nasty men slapping our bottoms' is just more of the feminist claptrap which has come to define that hate movement.

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hawkinspeter [3308 posts] 9 months ago
2 likes

@Legs_Eleven_Worcester - sounds like confirmation bias to me.

There's certainly lots of cyclists around with poor road-craft, but I prefer to celebrate that. Each person wobbling precariously on their bike is a person not sat in a car and is someone getting health/fitness benefits.

It's easy to predict that a cyclist is going to overtake a slow/stationary bus, so give them plenty of room to do so safely (which usually means slowing down to their speed for passing the bus and then zooming off afterwards).

Overtaking on the left is not a good idea (filtering excepted, though) and to be honest I'm surprised that you have more women doing that to you than men. The usual archetype is that male cyclists are the more aggressive/speed focused gender and the way you describe the undertake makes it sound like a move born out of frustration.

Anyhow, we want people with poor road skills to be going out and about on bikes rather than being cooped up in a deadly tonne of metal. Damage limitation - get as many idiots onto bikes as possible.

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Legs_Eleven_Wor... [559 posts] 9 months ago
1 like
hawkinspeter wrote:

@Legs_Eleven_Worcester - sounds like confirmation bias to me.

There's certainly lots of cyclists around with poor road-craft, but I prefer to celebrate that. Each person wobbling precariously on their bike is a person not sat in a car and is someone getting health/fitness benefits.

It's easy to predict that a cyclist is going to overtake a slow/stationary bus, so give them plenty of room to do so safely (which usually means slowing down to their speed for passing the bus and then zooming off afterwards).

Overtaking on the left is not a good idea (filtering excepted, though) and to be honest I'm surprised that you have more women doing that to you than men. The usual archetype is that male cyclists are the more aggressive/speed focused gender and the way you describe the undertake makes it sound like a move born out of frustration.

Anyhow, we want people with poor road skills to be going out and about on bikes rather than being cooped up in a deadly tonne of metal. Damage limitation - get as many idiots onto bikes as possible.

No, I don't believe that this is confirmation bias.  Or at the very least, it didn't start out that way.  I'm certainly not anti-woman.  I didn't set out looking for 'bad behaviour' on the part of any cyclist, irrespective of gender.  But after a while, I remember thinking, 'Fuck me .. why do so many women do that??'

FWIW, my wife agrees with my points.  I WhatsApped her the text of my comment before posting it.

As for the overtaking of buses, a lot of cyclists don't overtake stationary buses.  Especially the slower ones.  I often do it if I'm particularly worn out from a day at work, or if I've done a lot of miles over the weekend.  

But I do take your point about getting more people out of cars and onto bikes. 

 

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Paul__M [52 posts] 9 months ago
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Just a small one, but I have heard the comment 'Cycling gives you big legs' more than once when fitness was being discussed. We all know meeting government activity targets by bike won't turn you into Robert Forstemann, but the lithe yoga instructor or light long distance runner image maybe more aspirational for many.

Of course saftey is the big one. I wouldn't encourage anyone who's (understandably) nervous about that to take to the main roads.

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davel [2718 posts] 9 months ago
2 likes
Legs_Eleven_Worcester wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:

@Legs_Eleven_Worcester - sounds like confirmation bias to me.

There's certainly lots of cyclists around with poor road-craft, but I prefer to celebrate that. Each person wobbling precariously on their bike is a person not sat in a car and is someone getting health/fitness benefits.

It's easy to predict that a cyclist is going to overtake a slow/stationary bus, so give them plenty of room to do so safely (which usually means slowing down to their speed for passing the bus and then zooming off afterwards).

Overtaking on the left is not a good idea (filtering excepted, though) and to be honest I'm surprised that you have more women doing that to you than men. The usual archetype is that male cyclists are the more aggressive/speed focused gender and the way you describe the undertake makes it sound like a move born out of frustration.

Anyhow, we want people with poor road skills to be going out and about on bikes rather than being cooped up in a deadly tonne of metal. Damage limitation - get as many idiots onto bikes as possible.

No, I don't believe that this is confirmation bias. 

So you've done an objective study then? Because if you haven't, you must realise (hence your preface) that

'I don't believe that this is confirmation bias'

just comes across as

'ranty misogynist thinks he's right'.

And your wife agreeing with you, whether your wife's a woman, a budgie or a paper clip, doesn't exactly count as peer review.

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Legs_Eleven_Wor... [559 posts] 9 months ago
0 likes
davel wrote:
Legs_Eleven_Worcester wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:

@Legs_Eleven_Worcester - sounds like confirmation bias to me.

There's certainly lots of cyclists around with poor road-craft, but I prefer to celebrate that. Each person wobbling precariously on their bike is a person not sat in a car and is someone getting health/fitness benefits.

It's easy to predict that a cyclist is going to overtake a slow/stationary bus, so give them plenty of room to do so safely (which usually means slowing down to their speed for passing the bus and then zooming off afterwards).

Overtaking on the left is not a good idea (filtering excepted, though) and to be honest I'm surprised that you have more women doing that to you than men. The usual archetype is that male cyclists are the more aggressive/speed focused gender and the way you describe the undertake makes it sound like a move born out of frustration.

Anyhow, we want people with poor road skills to be going out and about on bikes rather than being cooped up in a deadly tonne of metal. Damage limitation - get as many idiots onto bikes as possible.

No, I don't believe that this is confirmation bias. 

So you've done an objective study then? Because if you haven't, you must realise (hence your preface) that

'I don't believe that this is confirmation bias'

just comes across as

'ranty misogynist thinks he's right'.

And your wife agreeing with you, whether your wife's a woman, a budgie or a paper clip, doesn't exactly count as peer review.

Oh, look.  A man posts something in any way, shape or form critical of women, based on personal experience and he's a 'ranty misogynist'.  

Piss off, son. 
 

 

Avatar
alansmurphy [2113 posts] 9 months ago
1 like

I'm with Davel here I'm afraid.

 

We often ride around the Peaks and cross wheels with the GB development squad, I have to admit that some of them are considerably better on a bike than me, with or without a penis (them not me)?

 

Your confirmation bias perhaps comes from observation of completely different people irrespect of gender. If you're a weekend warrior the likelihood is you see more males cycling, the same if you're an inner city commuter. These are then also likely to want to own the road. On the other hand, you may also then see Doris bimbling along with a basket to purchase a loaf of bread, her aim is to ride slowly and safely to the shop and not come into conflict with Jo Subaru.

 

Regardless of their skill sets, I'd expect the responsible, qualified motorist to try not to hit them with their 2 tonnes of metal, surely you would too. Unless you rank the importance of their life based on their cycling skill set?

 

It is nice though that you get the better half to check your work before you post it out in the wild, which helmet fits best around a skull with a thumb attached?

Avatar
davel [2718 posts] 9 months ago
3 likes
Legs_Eleven_Worcester wrote:
davel wrote:
Legs_Eleven_Worcester wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:

@Legs_Eleven_Worcester - sounds like confirmation bias to me.

There's certainly lots of cyclists around with poor road-craft, but I prefer to celebrate that. Each person wobbling precariously on their bike is a person not sat in a car and is someone getting health/fitness benefits.

It's easy to predict that a cyclist is going to overtake a slow/stationary bus, so give them plenty of room to do so safely (which usually means slowing down to their speed for passing the bus and then zooming off afterwards).

Overtaking on the left is not a good idea (filtering excepted, though) and to be honest I'm surprised that you have more women doing that to you than men. The usual archetype is that male cyclists are the more aggressive/speed focused gender and the way you describe the undertake makes it sound like a move born out of frustration.

Anyhow, we want people with poor road skills to be going out and about on bikes rather than being cooped up in a deadly tonne of metal. Damage limitation - get as many idiots onto bikes as possible.

No, I don't believe that this is confirmation bias. 

So you've done an objective study then? Because if you haven't, you must realise (hence your preface) that

'I don't believe that this is confirmation bias'

just comes across as

'ranty misogynist thinks he's right'.

And your wife agreeing with you, whether your wife's a woman, a budgie or a paper clip, doesn't exactly count as peer review.

Oh, look.  A man posts something in any way, shape or form critical of women, based on personal experience and he's a 'ranty misogynist'.  

Piss off, son. 
 

 

Sorry.

I meant ranty, misogynistic, zionist simpleton cunt.

If I was your son, you'd be under the patio. Dad.

You knew how it was going to come across - you even wimped out with a vague apology to begin with. The thing is, you're being called out for confirmation bias more than dodgy sexism, and you're too fucking thick to work out what you should be offended by.

You're just shit.

Avatar
gmac101 [230 posts] 9 months ago
2 likes

I work in Kingston Upon Thames and the number of women who cycle in and around the town is larger than the typical percentages given for womans involvement in cycling.  There are, at times 30-50% of the bikes in the racks are of the type typically aimed at women i.e. step through frames, flowery graphics etc (I appreciate that this not a definite indicator of the sex of the rider).  Kingston is not a "dutch" paradise despite the efforts of the local council but there is just enough infrastructure to make cycling appear to be safe and you can see the infrastructure from your car as you queue on the inner ring road.  Cycling also allows you to get right into the town as most of it is pedestrianised rather than walking from the car parks outside the inner ring.  

There are also push forces, parking is expensive and you often have to queue for spaces at busy times. 

Woman want to be safe (doesn't everybody) if you make it safe they will cycle

 

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