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Put a new tyre on a couple of weeks ago (gaterskin 25mm) and must have hit something really sharp as its sliced all the way through. I don't want to throw it away but it's unrideable. Any advice on patching it up? I was going to just put a load of innertube patch glue in the slice and try and get it to seal and maybe put a tubeless patch on the inside

24 comments

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Mr Pennington [43 posts] 10 months ago
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Maybe some good close-up photos of the cut would get you more replies.

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AfterPeak [162 posts] 10 months ago
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Sure

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AfterPeak [162 posts] 10 months ago
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Ignore the blue stuff. That's me attempting to glue it back

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Kadinkski [809 posts] 10 months ago
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Just buy a new one - they're not expensive.

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Mr Pennington [43 posts] 10 months ago
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I have had similar cuts from hitting potholes. Here's what I did, it takes some time but worth it.

1. Clean and scuff the cut area well. Wipe area with isopopryl alcohol soaked rag.

2. Use Vulcanizing Glue. Plain rubber cement is just a gooey mess

3. Use a toothpick or similar tool and glue the outside cut

4. Press or lay weights over cut area until glue dries

5. Glue good tire patch on inside of tire. Follow above

6. Make a boot. Cut an old tire tube so it's covers the cut bead-to-bead and 5 cm lengthwise. Glue corners of boot. Let dry. This prevents boot from shifting while mounting tube inside tire.

7. Mount tire. Inflate to riding psi. Leave for several hours. This ensures the patch seats well with the tire.

You can make the boot ahead of time.

I hope this gets you back on the road soon.

 

 

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Welsh boy [699 posts] 10 months ago
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Do as Mr Pennington says then put the £30 you saved towards the dental treatment you may need when the bodge repair fails on a high speed descent.  Better still, follow Kadinkski's advice.

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Grahamd [1052 posts] 10 months ago
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Had a Contintal tyre tear a couple of years back. I sent photos back to the retailer, Chain Reaction and they duly posted a free replacement. 

 

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srchar [1584 posts] 10 months ago
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It's not the dentist's bill I'd worry about, it's the taxi driver's.  If it lets go properly when you're out, there's a high chance that you'll be stuffed for a roadside repair.

If you're determined to keep it, put it on the rear, but really, a replacement costs less than £24 on Wiggle at the moment.  That's the cost of a few pints; at least it is round my way  2

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A_Moses [12 posts] 10 months ago
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Unless you're really strapped for cash then I tend to agree with the bin-it brigade. I once hobbled about ten miles home at low pressure with a bit of margarine tub holding a split tyre, but I rode like I was carrying nitroglycerin and binned the tyre as soon as I got home. Even if the repair is successful you'll ride on tenterhooks on the granny ring.

I don't believe that a repair will last and you can guarantee that when it goes it will be in the dark, pissing down, your lights will be in battery-saver mode and zombies will have chosen that exact moment to start roaming the earth: and it probably won't be repairable, so you're going to have to carry a spare tyre with you from now on.

Maybe Santa could bring you a new tyre?

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hawkinspeter [4102 posts] 10 months ago
4 likes

I'd recommend fitting a new tyre first and then that gives you plenty of time to try to fix the old one.

I'm currently trying to fix a 1cm cut in a tubeless tyre with some neoprene glue: https://smile.amazon.co.uk/dp/B000SCJQYQ

I've put a small repair patch onto the inside of the tyre so that the pressure can't just push out the repair and it looks to have set successfully.

The next step is to leave it around for months until you forget about it and eventually bin it when your other half complains about all the semi-repaired bits of crap lying around.

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AfterPeak [162 posts] 10 months ago
2 likes
HawkinsPeter wrote:

I'd recommend fitting a new tyre first and then that gives you plenty of time to try to fix the old one.

I'm currently trying to fix a 1cm cut in a tubeless tyre with some neoprene glue: https://smile.amazon.co.uk/dp/B000SCJQYQ

I've put a small repair patch onto the inside of the tyre so that the pressure can't just push out the repair and it looks to have set successfully.

The next step is to leave it around for months until you forget about it and eventually bin it when your other half complains about all the semi-repaired bits of crap lying around.

 

Ha! Been there!

 

Thanks for the replies everyone. I had a spare tyre so did actually change it out but didnt want to chuck £25 in the bin. I did try a patch/boot but it still bulged with a tube in so might be it cant be repaired.

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mike the bike [1264 posts] 10 months ago
2 likes

 

Look on the bright side Spike, if you have to bin a tyre then a Gatorskin is the one to lose.  I speak as possibly the only man in England who despises them; they are greatly over-rated, significantly over-priced but, in every other respect, wholly underwhelming.

 

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ktache [2140 posts] 10 months ago
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I bodged a newish semislick MTB tyre a long time ago when I had a lot less money, nice tyre too, fitted a Park tyre boot, Tyre was good but it did ruin the inner tube.  The boot just caused many punctures. Had to buy a new tyre anyway.  Now I just use the boots to get me home, and am disappointed in losing a good tyre but it's one of those things.  

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Argos74 [517 posts] 10 months ago
3 likes

I just did the last nine months with duct tape and superglue holding a 1cm cut in the side wall together. The tread just wore out, first tyre ever to do so with no punctures in its lifetime.

Then the tube exploded putting the new tyre on. FFS.

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Fish_n_Chips [596 posts] 10 months ago
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What about those Park tyre wall patches?

Personally get a new tyre.  

Maybe we could set up a fund or Paypal you a £1...

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hawkinspeter [4102 posts] 10 months ago
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Argos74 wrote:

I just did the last nine months with duct tape and superglue holding a 1cm cut in the side wall together. The tread just wore out, first tyre ever to do so with no punctures in its lifetime.

Then the tube exploded putting the new tyre on. FFS.

I'm sure I heard somewhere that superglue wasn't very good for tyres as it isn't flexible and can have sharp points when set.

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Argos74 [517 posts] 10 months ago
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Aye, you're probably right. It was hardening and cracking around the bodge repair by the time I threw it away.

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matthewn5 [1416 posts] 10 months ago
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Neoprene glue is good for sealing up small cuts once you've picked out the bits of glass and flints, as part of regular maintenance. Takes about 36 hours to dry, though

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turnerjohn [62 posts] 10 months ago
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I successfully fixed a small sidewall cut in a GP4000s by sewing it up with dental floss (the thin type) and a patch on the rear....never had an issue with it and wore the tread out. Wouldn't use that method on a contact area though . If it's broken the carcass the tyre will finally break apart under high pressure.

like some others have said the Gators are pretty poor IMHO  

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Chris Hayes [459 posts] 10 months ago
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Get a new tyre.  You can bodge it, but to be safe I wouldn't bother. It's unrideable at the high pressures you'd use on a road bike.  And your cut is on the edge of the tyre wall, so don't even try some of the 'fixes' above.   As others have pointed out, small cuts and knicks can be fixed successfully with neoprene glue: this one cannot.  Good news is that they are constantly on sale these days.  

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Butty [353 posts] 10 months ago
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Looks like it is destined for turbo use. If it pops then you'll get an impressive bang in the garage, but no bones broken

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keef66 [76 posts] 10 months ago
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2 years ago I suffered 2 separate sidewall cuts in 2 virtually new tyres.  True to my Yorkshire roots I was loath to bin a pair of £30+ tyres so attemped various repairs.  All were ultimately futile; in each case the carcass was compromised and it still bulged a bit too much for my liking.  Permanent use of a thick internal patch or a tyre boot only caused wear to the inner tube and eventual punctures.

Both tyres were Michelin Pro4 SCs, and suffered the terminal damage on dry roads in the middle of summer.  I concluded their sidewalls were too fragile.

 

 

 

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madcarew [1002 posts] 10 months ago
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Welsh boy wrote:

Do as Mr Pennington says then put the £30 you saved towards the dental treatment you may need when the bodge repair fails on a high speed descent.  Better still, follow Kadinkski's advice.

That's just silly. I have booted dozens and dozens of tyres, it's an accepted practice in all kinds of industries, and it doesn't lead to critical failure any more than any other puncture might.

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madcarew [1002 posts] 10 months ago
1 like

To cure the flap on the outside either wetsuit (neoprene) glue, or good old super glue. If the slash goes all the way through then personally I put a piece of margarine container or some other thin slightly soft piece of plastic in there and just let the air pressure hold it in place. I have ridden thousands and thousands of km with tyres repaired like this, often on the road side with a meusli bar wrapper. To those suggesting binning it.... if nothing else think of the environment.