Support road.cc

Like this site? Help us to make it better.

forum

Mirrorless cameras on a ride?

Hi all. 

I'm looking for a mirrorless camera to take on rides. I have an old (very large and heavy) DSLR which I'd like to downsize with this upgrade. Does anyone have any recomendations? I'd like to have the option of not just having a fixed lens so I can do some out of the saddle shots too. 

Fuji, Ricoh, Sony etc?

Cheers!

If you're new please join in and if you have questions pop them below and the forum regulars will answer as best we can.

Add new comment

9 comments

Avatar
IanMSpencer | 9 months ago
1 like

I sold my DSLRs recently.

I use 2 cameras, a Panasonic Lumix TXZ90 and an FXZ82. They are very similar in software terms so no issue switching.

The TX90 is pocket sized the FZ82 is a bridge camera. They are both micro 4/3s and I shoot in RAW then run stuff through Lightroom with a custom preset to boost contrast, saturation and clarity a bit.

They both have massive zoom range 40x zoom on the TX90 and 60x on the FZ82. In most conditions get high quality pictures and either the camera or Lightroom successfully deal with distortion - I've never noticed any significant issues.

So when I don't want bulk I use the TX90 and have it as a backup when travelling, say going out in the evening when I don't want a bag with me. The FZ82 is a bit heavier, but not as heavy as a GH3 or Canon 60D. Can carry it all day hiking. I have a couple of cases that I put on my belt, though I will pop the FZ82 on a neck strap.

Neither are waterproof but the price performance of the FZ82 is, I think, amazing.

The only real negatives I find are that the focusing on low light is a bit temperamental and a bit fussy for flying birds. It does have burst modes though. Also, low light is quite noisy - for night time shots a smart phone with modern processing is far better.

This is off the TX90:

Avatar
IanMSpencer replied to IanMSpencer | 9 months ago
1 like

This off the FX82

Avatar
Cugel replied to IanMSpencer | 9 months ago
0 likes

IanMSpencer wrote:

I sold my DSLRs recently. I use 2 cameras, a Panasonic Lumix TXZ90 and an FXZ82. They are very similar in software terms so no issue switching. The TX90 is pocket sized the FZ82 is a bridge camera. They are both micro 4/3s and I shoot in RAW then run stuff through Lightroom with a custom preset to boost contrast, saturation and clarity a bit. They both have massive zoom range 40x zoom on the TX90 and 60x on the FZ82. In most conditions get high quality pictures and either the camera or Lightroom successfully deal with distortion - I've never noticed any significant issues. So when I don't want bulk I use the TX90 and have it as a backup when travelling, say going out in the evening when I don't want a bag with me. The FZ82 is a bit heavier, but not as heavy as a GH3 or Canon 60D. Can carry it all day hiking. I have a couple of cases that I put on my belt, though I will pop the FZ82 on a neck strap. Neither are waterproof but the price performance of the FZ82 is, I think, amazing. The only real negatives I find are that the focusing on low light is a bit temperamental and a bit fussy for flying birds. It does have burst modes though. Also, low light is quite noisy - for night time shots a smart phone with modern processing is far better. This is off the TX90:

Another vote for a Panasonic FZ82 - it has compromises but (especially using RAW, Lightroom & Topaz editing software) can produce amazing images for such a tiny sensor.

It isn't immune to dust, wet and shock, though, so I would only take it out on a bike wrapped up in swaddling clothes in the pannier, which doesn't make it swiftly usable.

Avatar
Tom_77 | 9 months ago
0 likes

About 10 years ago I bought a Nikon 1 V1 (it was something of comercial failure and could be picked up quite cheap). It's been my only 'proper' camera and I've been very happy with it - small enough to take when I go hillwalking or snowboarding and picture quality that's good enough for anything short of professional photography.

However, I find myself using it less and less as time goes on. Mobile phone cameras keep getting better and better, so I tend to use my phone and leave the camera at home.

DP Review is good for camera reviews and Flickr has a Camera Finder which is quite interesting.

Avatar
Cugel | 9 months ago
1 like

As another mentions, using a standard camera one-handed to take pics on the move is asking for a crash.

But if you want a camera that's easy to take with you on a bike but tough enough to survive the rigours of cycling (damp, vibration, dust and a possible drop) I suggest an Olympus Tough TG6 or 7. This won't get you the image quality or tele-range of an interchangeable lens camera but it will get you decent quality pictures (and movies) without costing loads and being vulnerable to those cycling rigours.

https://explore.omsystem.com/gb/en/tg-7?s_kwcid=AL!12609!10!722932000753...

The Olympus Tough TG6/7 also has built-in anti-shake that allows it to get decent images via being mounted to your handlebars with a small clamping gubbins, via the tripod mounting thread of the camera. It's not as good as a Go-Pro for that but it does make watchable movies (and pics). On the other hand, it does take RAW images, which gives you a lot of scope to use image improvement software.

There's also a wide range of accessories and use-modes. The microscope mode, for example, makes amazing macro shots via all sorts of features such as focus-stacking and use of a ring-light accessory.

The image quality from small sensors and "lesser" cameras can, these days, be dramatically improved with software such as that of Topaz and similar. Dramatically.

Worth a thought - but not if you're wanting to make top quality images for printing or other high-qualiy purposes. Very good for making prosthetic memories you would otherwise probably lose as the years go by, though.

Avatar
Rezis | 9 months ago
0 likes

I use the Olympus M4/3 OM-D cameras, but not very seriously. They're more than good enough for my needs but as already pointed out if you can keep using the money you've invested in lenses you probably should. And tbh the size saving on the body isn't massive if you're still using a big lens so maybe go properly portable (dare I say a quality compact?!) or GoPro everything...

Avatar
Miller | 9 months ago
1 like

Wanting a smaller camera is a natural desire but unless your DSLR is pro level I don't think that a modern interchangeable lens mirrorless camera is going to save you much weight. They've all got bigger than they used to be, even the M43 cameras. Of course mirrorless cams have many other virtues.

Also, this desire: "I'd like to have the option of not just having a fixed lens so I can do some out of the saddle shots too". If by that you mean shooting while riding - I wouldn't advise it with a proper camera. You'll be trying to frame a shot with a £x000 cam while riding along one-handed - there is so much potential for disaster.

I do take pics on the move but I use a tiny camera, Sony Rx0 ii, just guessing on the framing, then make corrections in the edit. 

RX0 is tiny, light, weatherproof, shockproof

//live.staticflickr.com/65535/52319566568_fdc814f29f_o.jpg)

RX0 photo taken on the move last year. If you open this image in a separate tab you'll see the full resolution. It's not bad.

//live.staticflickr.com/65535/52197938880_5e177cdb7f_o.jpg)

Avatar
mark1a | 9 months ago
1 like

If you already have a DSLR with reasonable investment in glass, I think I'd start by looking at what mirrorless options are available from the same manufacturer, as most will offer adapters for you to continue using your existing lenses on the new mount should you need to.

For me personally, I have a lot of Sony/Minolta A mount glass (some left over from Minolta 35mm film SLR) for my big camera (Sony A77mkII), and so it was an obvious choice to look at the Sony A6000 for the mirrorless option for when a smaller camera is needed. I have E mount lenses for this, and also have a A->E mount adapter so if need be, I can use the A mount stuff on the smaller camera. Also don't rule out a much smaller compact option, for example I have the Sony RX100mkIII which is pocket sized yet a decent sensor and Zeiss optics.

 

Avatar
Oldfatgit replied to mark1a | 9 months ago
1 like

I'd definitely second this.

Look at the kit you currently have for lens compatibility.
Canon mirrorless can use DLSR glass with an adapter... and I believe you can get Sony A to E mount adapters.

Might be worth checking MPB or Parks for a cheap, older body that's already got some scratches etc on.

Does it have to to be interchangeable? There's some pretty good pocket cameras out there now.

Latest Comments