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Do cyclists really benefit from this?

Nottinghamshire County Council say cyclists benefit from a bizarre cycle lane which takes riders off the road for a quick U-turn right by a T-junction. Local cyclists have however branded the infrastructure ‘random’ and ‘confusing’.

The Nottingham Post reports on a two-metre long, semi-circular painted lane on Lynton Road at the junction with Bramcote Lane. The owner of the nearby Cycle Inn bike shop, Jamie Ireland, said he imagined that most people ignored it.

"I think random is the right word. A lot of the time these strange cycle lanes – and I know of about four or five – can cause more confusion than anything.

"You've got a cycle and pedestrian path on Bramcote Lane then finally you get a clearly defined cycle path and it doesn't seem to make any sense. It's absolutely ludicrous. People might be doing 25mph on the road and then suddenly they've got to flick onto the pavement and make a sharp turn."

Keith Chong, a resident of Lynton Road, said that people did use it however, adding that the road is often used by cyclists who are trying to avoid the busier Bramcote Avenue nearby.

"It's a bit silly really, but people do use it. When there are markings there people will follow them. It takes you back around like a dog tail. It sort of makes sense if you're turning right, but not if you're turning left."

Gary Wood, group manager for environment and highways at Nottinghamshire County Council, said the lane is intended to guide cyclists onto the pedestrian and cycle path on Bramcote Lane.

"Lynton Road forms part of the network of cycle routes in the Beeston area and is a signed route that links to the shared pedestrian and cycle route that runs east along the south side of Bramcote Lane/Chilwell Lane to Alderman White School.

"The section of the cycle route at the junction of Lynton Road and Bramcote Lane guides cyclists to cross Lynton Road to enable people to safely access the shared use cycle route on the south side of Bramcote Lane. Both Lynton Road and the cycle route at its junction are used by cyclists who see its benefits."

Nottingham cycle infrastructure has been criticised on a number of occasions recently with some people resorting to graffiti to get their point across.

In April, a bike lane on Haydn Road, Sherwood, which runs alongside car parking bays was stencilled with an impression of a car door and the words ‘door lane,’ while a month earlier a controversial bike route near tramlines on Chilwell High Road was marked with the words ‘unsafe bike lane’.

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