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World Naked Bike Ride returns to London in June

"Go as bare as you dare" as capital prepares to host event for the 17th time...

The World Naked Bike returns to London this June, marking the 17th time it will have been held in the capital and with more starting locations than ever before, with eight to choose from.

Taking place on the afternoon of Saturday 13 December, the various start points will give participants the choice of short, slow routes or longer and faster ones into the centre for the main ride.

In all, including the feeder rides, the event – motto “Go as bare as you dare” – will cover 53 miles of streets throughout the city, crossing 14 bridges across the Thames.

The meeting points, plus times of gathering and setting off, are shown below.

Clapham Junction – Grant Road, SW11 2NU, 14:30 for14:45

Croydon – 233 Shirley Church Road, CR0 5AB 11:00 for 13:30

Deptford – Matchstick Piehouse, SE8 5HD 12:00 for 13:40

Hyde Park – North Carriage Drive, near Marble Arch 13:45 for 15:00

Kew Bridge – North end of Kew Bridge near W4 3NQ 13:30 for 13:45

Regent’s Park – Outer Circle, near NW1 4NA 14:20 for 14:50

Tower Hill – Trinity Square Gardens, EC3N 4DJ 13:45 for 14:45

Victoria Park – Near Bonner Gate/Dogs of Alcibiades E2 9JW 11:30 for 13:30.

First held in Seattle in 2003, the World Naked Bike Ride is now held in more than 120 cities around the world.

Its objectives are to:

Protest against the global dependency on oil

Curb car culture

Obtain real rights for cyclists

Demonstrate the vulnerability of cyclists on city streets   

Celebrate body freedom.

The ride is cleared in advance with the police. Under the Sexual Offences Act 2003, in England nudity is not illegal unless there is intent to cause alarm or distress to others.

You can find more information on the WNBR.London website, its Facebook page and Twitter feed.

Simon has been news editor at road.cc since 2009, reporting on 10 editions and counting of pro cycling’s biggest races such as the Tour de France, stories on issues including infrastructure and campaigning, and interviewing some of the biggest names in cycling. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, his background has proved invaluable in reporting on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, and the bike industry. He splits his time between London and Cambridge, and loves taking his miniature schnauzer Elodie on adventures in the basket of her Elephant Bike.

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