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Police take children's details after reports of dangerous cycling on the way to school

Two Police Community Support Officers took details of several pupils from The Chase School in Worcestershire

Students from The Chase school in Malvern, Worcestershire, were stopped by police after riding the wrong way on one-way streets in the town.

Two Police Community Support Officers (PCSO) visited the area following reports, and took details of pupils from the local school who were riding their bikes in a "dangerous" manner.

The Malvern Gazette reports the children's details will be passed on to school staff after they were seen "riding their bikes the wrong way on Lydes Road, Malvern, which is a one-way street".

The local newspaper says residents feared there would be a serious accident so raised their concerns with the police.

"After concerns were received in relation to some school pupils riding their bikes the wrong way on Lydes Road, Malvern, which is a one-way street, PCSO Tudge and PCSO Bullock of Pickersleigh and Chase Safer Neighbourhood Team attended the area this morning and took details of several Chase School pupils," a West Mercia Police spokesperson said.

"The pupils were spoken to and educated as to the dangers of riding their bikes the wrong way. Lydes Road is a busy one-way street, particularly at school run times and has a blind bend at the bottom.

"We are looking to educate those who have been riding their bikes the wrong way down Lydes Road in order to help avoid any children being hurt in an accident.

"We will be passing the pupils' details which were obtained this morning on to the Chase School and we would advise parents to speak with their children about road safety and the dangers of such actions.

"Pickersleigh and Chase Safer Neighbourhood Team will continue to pay attention to the area."

A member of staff from The Chase told the local news outlet that dangerous cycling would be dealt with "seriously".

"We have not yet been informed of specific details, however, we take the safety of our students and the local community seriously. We do offer advice on appropriate road use, free cycle safety checks, and request our students sign and comply with a cycling code of conduct if they wish to cycle to school.

"Any reports of dangerous cycling are dealt with seriously."

Back in 2017, children at one Birmingham school were told they face exclusion if they cycle anti-socially.

Head teacher Billy Downie delivered a "hard-hitting assembly" and said disciplinary action will be taken against pupils breaking the law.

Mr Downie wrote on social media: "We share your concern over the conduct of a minority of our students on bikes outside of school hours.

"In the past three months every student has had a hard-hitting assembly on the dangers of thoughtless behaviour on bikes."

Last September, a school in south London made headlines after banning knives, guns, drugs and … bicycles.

Dan is the road.cc news editor and has spent the past four years writing stories and features, as well as (hopefully) keeping you entertained on the live blog. Having previously written about nearly every other sport under the sun for the Express, and the weird and wonderful world of lower leagues football for the Non-League Paper, Dan joined road.cc in 2020. Come the weekend you'll find him labouring up a hill, probably with a mouth full of jelly babies, or making a bonk-induced trip to a south of England petrol station... in search of more jelly babies.

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20 comments

Avatar
Lazygit65 | 1 year ago
1 like

If only the Police were this diligent with errant parents pulling up wherever they want to discharge their cargo! I imagine there'd be a veritable flurry of paperwork! And who wants to walk with a bicycle!?

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Sriracha | 1 year ago
4 likes
Quote:

Lydes Road is a busy one-way street, particularly at school run times ...

There is an unfortunate irony in the suggestion that less cycling to school is part of the solution here.

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Pedal those squares | 1 year ago
2 likes

Just a question. 

Are the police allowed to just hand over personal details of actives outside school to the school?  The school do not have "parental responsibility" of the child.  Surely the police should inform the person with "parental responsibility" and not an organisation "they may or may not" be heading towards.  

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brooksby replied to Pedal those squares | 1 year ago
4 likes

This is what I said the other day.

Surely the police could approach the school and say, "We've seen some pupils in your uniform riding irresponsibly and think you ought to have a word with your students generally", but not pass over their names.

And if it really is something that needs name and address taken down, then the parent or whoever is in loco parentis is the person to speak to, not the school.

If they are outside of school premises and/or outside of school hours then I don't see why or how the school could discipline them.

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joe9090 | 1 year ago
5 likes

Seems like more British Orwellian efforts to criminilise childhood... twits. Why can that street not be made two way for cyclists? And I suspect that street was once two way until the motoring mafia made it unsafe. 
Small minded little Britainers. Elf'n'saftey gone mad etc etc. 

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Rik Mayals unde... | 1 year ago
3 likes

PCSO's Tudge and Bullock? 

Is it April 1st?

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lllnorrislll | 1 year ago
3 likes

So the school has gone with the hard hitting stance of don't brake the law / putting the fear of God in to children, so that they don't cycle. Vs education on how to cycle, maybe introduce bikeability and maybe encourage even more to ride!?!

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John Stevenson | 1 year ago
12 likes

Looks like a residential street to me. Loads of such streets in Cambridge are one-way for motors, two-way for bikes. Carnage remarkably fails to ensue.

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hawkinspeter replied to John Stevenson | 1 year ago
7 likes
John Stevenson wrote:

Looks like a residential street to me. Loads of such streets in Cambridge are one-way for motors, two-way for bikes. Carnage remarkably fails to ensue.

I think one-way roads should all be considered two way for bikes, scooters and pedestrians as long as care is taken when going the opposite direction (and giving priority to oncoming traffic). It seems obvious to me that one-way roads are only considering the needs of motorists.

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Robert Hardy replied to John Stevenson | 1 year ago
1 like

It was many years after the roads were made one way, that the two way dispensation for cycles was introduced.

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OnYerBike replied to John Stevenson | 1 year ago
5 likes

And there would be ample room for a contra-flow cycle lane if they simply stopped cars parking/waiting outside the primary school. There's only space for half a dozen or so cars anyway so no real loss - although I daresay there would be uproar from the parents of that school if they weren't allowed to pull up and idle their engine or stop on the zig-zag markings (both of which are already illegal but it appears that the school has had to take additional measures to try and prevent them).

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Rendel Harris replied to John Stevenson | 1 year ago
5 likes

John Stevenson wrote:

Looks like a residential street to me. Loads of such streets in Cambridge are one-way for motors, two-way for bikes. Carnage remarkably fails to ensue.

Works brilliantly in Paris where it is pretty much the norm.

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chrisonabike replied to Rendel Harris | 1 year ago
1 like

I encountered this in Belgium some years back.  There it was also done on main roads.  That was clearly done to cheaply expand cycle access on a larger rural network.  It worked but I found "jousting" with oncoming lorries across the width of a painted line a ... stimulating experience.

It's best with proper protection / segregation or in lower traffic areas.  Which our example site should clearly be.  My only concern is that crossing traffic needs to be aware of cyclists from two directions.  In the UK that would (currently) increase the risk.  That can be mitigated but requires stuff we don't currently do well - or at all e.g. continuous cycleway across the side street, attention to sight lines etc.

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Boopop | 1 year ago
6 likes

I'm happy to find Malvern has a cycling campaign group. I've tweeted them. Next stop Stop De Kindermoord, Malvern edition?

https://twitter.com/TomLittlehales/status/1526603006598324224

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JMcL_Ireland | 1 year ago
5 likes

Starsky and Hutch, Morse and Lewis, Crockett and Tubbs.... now adding Tudge and Bullock. The good citizens of Malvern are in safe hands I feel

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andystow | 1 year ago
6 likes

Even Google Maps cycling directions suggest that route against traffic on both Lydes Road and Upper Chase Road. I suppose that for some odd reason students don't care for riding on the B4208.

https://goo.gl/maps/UePy3PNwNy7xMDc6A

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brooksby | 1 year ago
14 likes

The Chase is a secondary with a sixth form.

I can see the PCSOs "having a word", but am not sure about passing those kids' details on to the school.   What is it to do with the school, what pupils were doing when out of school hours / off school premises? 

And don't get me started on

Quote:

We do ... request our students sign and comply with a cycling code of conduct if they wish to cycle to school.

I trust that they get the parents to sign a motoring code of conduct if they wish to drive their kids to school?

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lesterama | 1 year ago
9 likes

Perhaps the various authorities need to work out how schoolkids on bikes can get safely to school from the NW

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pockstone replied to lesterama | 1 year ago
10 likes

Maybe close Lydes Road to motor traffic at 'school run times', so even more children can cycle to and from school safely?

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eburtthebike replied to lesterama | 1 year ago
7 likes

lesterama wrote:

Perhaps the various authorities need to work out how schoolkids on bikes can get safely to school from the NW

Absolutely.  If the desire line is that way then it would make more sense to make it safe to cycle on that road.

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