Home
Verdict: 
More than just a coffee table book, a genuinely useful guide that will soon have tattered edges through use
Weight: 
420g

A book 'written in the style of a training manual', Lexie Williamson's Yoga for Cyclists is a book all cyclists should have.

As someone who already does yoga, I thought the appeal of this book was huge. Often after a ride, a few stretches is something most of us will do, and yoga goes beyond that. Very much written like an instruction manual, the book contains good descriptions and photography to explain everything to the reader.

Lexie Williamson is a very qualified yoga instructor and specialises in yoga for cyclists and runners. Her knowledge is shown throughout the various chapters of the book.

It can seem a little daunting at first, even for those who have done some yoga before. Like most instruction books, it takes a little practise to fully understand what you are being asked to do. From breathing technique to on bike stretches, the book appears to cover everything.

I thought the layout was a little strange as I worked my way through the various poses. I had to keep stopping to turn the pages to get from one pose to the next, but as I said above, the more you do it, the more familiar it becomes.

At the rear of the book are a few 'flow' sequences that are much easier to follow once you have mastered some of the technique of the individual positions. These flows are faster moving and are great post ride stretches. The book offers a variety of flows from ones that assist back pain to quad strengthening. Of course they are not limited to post ride only and are actually great to do on non ride days too.

The final chapters cover concentration and recovery yoga. The book wants to help 'tame your monkey mind'. In other words help you focus your mind on the task at hand rather than having random thoughts. I found this chapter particularly useful because it's really easy to let your brain run away from what you are actually doing. Small improvements in concentration really do help you cycle better.

The book offers a great deal of instruction and each chapter starts with a summary of why it's important and the thinking behind it. A really good read that will improve your riding.

Verdict

More than just a coffee table book, a genuinely useful guide that will soon have tattered edges through use

If you're thinking of buying this product using a cashback deal why not use the road.cc Top Cashback page and get some top cashback while helping to support your favourite independent cycling website

road.cc test report

Make and model: Bloomsbury Yoga for Cyclists

Size tested: Paperback

Tell us what the product is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Aimed at cyclists of all levels, the book certainly is suitable for beginners to experienced yoga enthusiasts.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

"Yoga is fast becoming an essential performance tool for road cyclists keen to improve flexibility, core strength, balance, breathing efficiency and mental focus."

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
9/10
Rate the product for performance:
 
9/10
Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the product for value:
 
8/10

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

The book is a simple to follow guide to improve your technique through yoga. It uses clear images and plain language. It reads very well and I had no trouble following the instructions.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

The book uses photography to illustrate yoga poses, I found these very helpful.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes.

Would you consider buying the product? Yes.

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 34  Height: 158cms  Weight: 61kg

I usually ride: Giant defy  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: Under 5 years  I ride: A few times a week  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: road racing, commuting, sportives, general fitness riding, mtb,

 

13 comments

Avatar
Martin Thomas [385 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

Ooh I like the look of this. Duly ordered.

Avatar
crikey [1251 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

Considerably cheaper in other on-line stores....  3

Avatar
Martin Thomas [385 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

Oh...  2

Avatar
Magic [22 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

Sat at the Café stop today, In a Garden centre normally frequented by a large proportion of Pensioners, so limited on reading material. Theres a Health and Fitness mag with an interview with Vicky P. During which they ask her what she's doing in retirement. Got her PT course and doing a lot of Yoga. Apparently she never did it whilst competing, because increased flexibility looses you Power. Really?

Avatar
jacknorell [1064 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes
Magic wrote:

Apparently she never did it whilst competing, because increased flexibility looses you Power. Really?

No, it doesn't. But it's a common myth, usually by people who see their dislike for stretching confirmed  3

Avatar
sooper6 [29 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

Bought the ipad version that has some videos, early days, but sorted the nagging stiffness across my shoulders I get occasionally.

Avatar
RoadChick2 [11 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes
jacknorell wrote:
Magic wrote:

Apparently she never did it whilst competing, because increased flexibility looses you Power. Really?

No, it doesn't. But it's a common myth, usually by people who see their dislike for stretching confirmed  3

Weight lifters are pretty unflexible. I'm not sure they can even wipe their own butts. There has to be some theory or truth behind this claim.

That said, for 99.9% of the rest of us, Yoga, stretching, and flexibility is probably without question excellent for us.

Avatar
Magic [22 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

In basic terms Flexibility involves the range of motion of a joint. Most muscles are at there most powerful/ ability to maintain force at the mid point of a joint movement.
i.e when flexing the elbow joint the bicep will create most power when the joint angle is around 90 degrees.
It stands to reason then that at the end points of the range of motion of a joint the muscle will be producing its least power, that does not however mean that the increased range of motion will result in less power at its mid point. I think what she was referring to is that over extension creates inefficiency . I would Imagine good Yoga practice though would promote joint control and stability.

Avatar
Cyclist [295 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes
Magic wrote:

Sat at the Café stop today, In a Garden centre normally frequented by a large proportion of Pensioners, so limited on reading material. Theres a Health and Fitness mag with an interview with Vicky P. During which they ask her what she's doing in retirement. Got her PT course and doing a lot of Yoga. Apparently she never did it whilst competing, because increased flexibility looses you Power. Really?

Dear me, not much hope as a PT then. Does she think Gymnasts are lacking in Power!

I do thirty minutes of Yoga x3 per week, plus x2 90min sessions, plus a 20 min abridged routine I devised, after every turbo-ride-Strength & conditioning session. Also X1 yoga retreat a year. Take all the spiritual stuff out of it, it is one of the best training methodologies I use.

I have the book 5/10. I would say find a class.

Avatar
Cyclist [295 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes
RoadChick2 wrote:
jacknorell wrote:
Magic wrote:

Apparently she never did it whilst competing, because increased flexibility looses you Power. Really?

No, it doesn't. But it's a common myth, usually by people who see their dislike for stretching confirmed  3

Weight lifters are pretty unflexible. I'm not sure they can even wipe their own butts. There has to be some theory or truth behind this claim.

That said, for 99.9% of the rest of us, Yoga, stretching, and flexibility is probably without question excellent for us.

I often think, dam, those weight lifters have poor flexibility. Flexibility is one of the cornerstones of total fitness. Two weightlifters & a Bodybuilder.

Avatar
Okinawa [65 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

What is the world coming too? What next? Fishing for Cyclist

Avatar
crikey [1251 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

Mine arrived today, £12.33 delivered from www.hive.co.uk. I read it this afternoon and am currently waiting for my wife to come home to call an ambulance for me, because I can't reach the telephone from the floor.

Avatar
macrophotofly [333 posts] 4 years ago
0 likes

I bought the the kindle version (on my ipad), thinking the inclusion of videos would be helpful. Wish I hadn't - not so much the videos fault (although they aren't frequent enough) - much more the page layout which is aweful. Descriptions and diagrams on different pages; multiple page turns to see a sequence of photos (on the book version above I can see they are all on one page).
If you can get the book version (not out here in Japan until march), then do so