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Verdict: 
If you want the thing that makes your bike replicate the gradients in Zwift, here it is
Weight: 
8,100g

The Wahoo KICKR CLIMB is going to be a divisive product, with the indoor evangelists trumpeting its arrival to bring extra realism to online riding, and the naysayers pointing out that it's £500 for a thing that makes the front of your bike go up and down about half a metre. It works, and it's kind of fun to have it as part of your training environment. And it's not like there are any alternative options right now.

  • Pros: Goes up and down, Just Works™
  • Cons: Costs £500, only works with Wahoo trainers

Does it work? Yes, it does. The CLIMB is very responsive to changes in the road gradient, and because it's being controlled from the trainer, both tend to be nicely in sync. I was using the CLIMB with the newest Wahoo KICKR, and generally the experience was excellent. The CLIMB is very quick to react, so on the bits of the New York circuit, for example, when the park-level road kicks up to 10% all of a sudden, it can be a bit unnerving as the bike suddenly shoots up at the front. If anything, the gradient changes feel quicker on the CLIMB than they are on the KICKR, as the big flywheel smooths things out a bit and lets you carry some momentum into a hill. Overall, I was impressed.

> Find your nearest dealer here

You can choose to manually raise or lower the front end using the wired remote, which pulls out of the top of the unit attached to a 1980s telephone cord and fits to your bars with a rubber strap. I'm a fan of using a wire here: why go wireless when the handlebar can never be more than about 50cm from the unit? Manual control could be useful if, for example, you're doing climbing drills on TrainerRoad (which won't send gradient data to the trainer) and you want to replicate a climbing position indoors. Mostly you're going to be interested in the CLIMB if you're using Zwift, or another immersive indoor training app, and you want the bike to do what the road on the screen does, but the manual option also means you can turn the up/down motion off if you're starting to feel a bit travel sick.

Wahoo KICKR CLIMB Indoor Grade Simulator - remote 2.jpg

The CLIMB only works with Wahoo trainers. And not even all Wahoo trainers, just the compatible ones: the KICKR '18 and '17 (not the earlier models), the KICKR CORE and the KICKR SNAP '17 (not the 2014 model). If you don't know which model you have then there's a handy ready reckoner on the Wahoo website. That narrows the appeal quite a lot, so why has Wahoo given the CLIMB such limited compatibility? Those trainers have a pivot at the axle, which means that the rear end of the bike can move freely. If your frame is clamped into a trainer without one, you risk damaging the frame.

Wahoo KICKR CLIMB Indoor Grade Simulator - 4.jpg

Not that it would work anyway, because the CLIMB is controlled by the trainer, not the app, and only those trainers will currently send data to it. Zwift and other online training apps already send gradient data to the trainer, and it's the trainer's job to parse that and adjust the resistance accordingly. If the CLIMB is connected to the trainer too, it's a simple enough job for Wahoo to send the information along the line. But to connect the CLIMB directly to Zwift – or Bkool, or the Elite app, or anything else that can send gradient data – means making sure each individual app has the option to connect to the CLIMB. It's a specific class of unit, which would probably mean it would need its own place on the sensors page, and possibly even its own ANT+ device profile; I'm not sure what kind of device the CLIMB is declaring itself as when it pairs to the trainer, but there's no device profile for a gradient simulator, so presumably Wahoo is using one of the other profiles and hacking it a bit, or it's just made a proprietary one.

> Buyer's Guide: 16 of the best turbo trainers and rollers

If the downside of the limited compatibility is that not as many people will be interested in buying one, the major upside is that it Just Works™. You plug it in using the huge A/C adaptor, you hit the middle button to pair, it pairs, and that's that. Well, after you've selected the right set of axle mounts from the wide selection available and attached your bike. Quick release, 12mm and 15mm thru-axles and Boost are supported, so unless you turbo on a fat bike or a Brompton you should be okay.

Wahoo KICKR CLIMB Indoor Grade Simulator - detail 2.jpg

One thing to note is that the gradient information that Zwift sends is dependent on the trainer difficulty setting in the app. If you've set your difficulty to zero, then Zwift doesn't send any gradient changes to the trainer, and consequently your bike won't move up or down. If you're at 50% difficulty and you hit a 10% section, the CLIMB will replicate a 5% climb, and so on. So if you want maximum realism, wang the slider all the way to the right.

'Difficulty' is a misnomer, as it doesn't get any more difficult in a numbers sense: whatever the slider setting, you need to put 300W through the pedals to get 300W in the game. But reducing the setting does make certain things easier: racing, for example, which on Zwift tends to reward a steady state effort.

Wahoo KICKR CLIMB Indoor Grade Simulator - 1.jpg

The range of movement the CLIMB offers is excellent: the 16% slopes of the New York skyline climb can actually make your bike feel a bit unwieldy on the trainer, and I preferred the feel of the CLIMB with the realism meter dialled back to about 70%; that way you still get a good range of movement but I found it easier to keep a rhythm.

Wahoo KICKR CLIMB Indoor Grade Simulator - 3.jpg

At the end of the day, you've probably already decided whether you want a CLIMB or not. If you saw it for the first time and thought, 'I need this in my life right now', then unless you find out here that it doesn't work – and that hasn't happened – then it's simply a case of whether you're prepared to shell out the price of a decent winter bike to have it in your pain cave. If you saw it and genuinely couldn't see the point of it, then it doesn't matter if it's £500 or £50 or £5,000, really.

Would I buy one? No, I don't think I would, but I can see that for some people it would add to the experience, and if you've already dropped a grand on a KICKR trainer and at least as much again on a computer and a big telly, shelling out another £500 for that last dash of realism might seem like a final step worth taking. It's hard to score, really. It does what it does, it works well, and you'll either want it or you won't. I'm not judging you.

Verdict

If you want the thing that makes your bike replicate the gradients in Zwift, here it is

If you're thinking of buying this product using a cashback deal why not use the road.cc Top Cashback page and get some top cashback while helping to support your favourite independent cycling website

road.cc test report

Make and model: Wahoo KICKR CLIMB Indoor Grade Simulator

Size tested: Dimensions: 25.75" H x 5.1" W x 7" L

Tell us what the product is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Wahoo says, "The latest innovation from Wahoo will literally take your indoor training to the next level! KICKR CLIMB indoor grade simulator is designed to work exclusively with the new KICKR and new SNAP and when paired, it will add physical grade changes to your indoor training. The CLIMB is compatible with Third Party Apps, so whether riding a virtual course or performing a structured workout, KICKR CLIMB blends ascents and descents with resistance changes for a truly immersive indoor training experience. The world isn't flat; now, neither is your ride!"

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

REAL-TIME GRADE CHANGES

KICKR CLIMB physically adjusts your bike position to mimic real roads and mountain climbing. This allows you to naturally change position on the bike, engage climbing muscles, and improve pedaling technique to become more efficient and powerful climber.

ASCEND UP TO 20% AND DECEND DOWN TO -10%

KICKR CLIMB quickly raises and lowers your bike to match ascents of up to 20% grade and descents of -10% grade when paired with the new KICKR or new SNAP. Climbs are more realistic than ever when training indoors! *Exact grade changes dependent on bicycle size, wheel size and trainer type.

WORKS WITH WAHOO KICKR SMART TRAINERS

KICKR CLIMB was designed jointly with the new KICKR and new KICKR SNAP indoor bike trainers (2017 Editions) to deliver the best possible riding experience. It pairs directly to the smart trainer for a connection that allows the trainer to control the KICKR CLIMB.

DIRECT PROXIMITY PAIRING

Use the KICKR CLIMB's remote to quickly and directly pair it to your KICKR or KICKR SNAP. Press the remote button and you are ready to go!

LOCKED AND UNLOCKED CLIMBING MODES

Unlock Mode allows the CLIMB to react to grade changes from external sources such as Zwift or TrainerRoad, or from your ELEMNT or ELEMNT BOLT GPS bike computer.

Lock Mode ensures the KICKR CLIMB will only respond to commands received from the remote.

MANUAL GRADE ADJUSTMENTS WITH REMOTE CONTROL

KICKR CLIMB's remote attaches to your handlebars so you can adjust the grade manually with a simple press of a button. When not in use the remote conveniently stores away in the top of the KICKR CLIMB.

3RD PARTY APP COMPATIBILITY

When paired to a KICKR or KICKR SNAP the KICKR CLIMB can match grade changes from select training platforms, such as The Sufferfest and Zwift, to create a truly immersive ride experience. Whether riding a virtual course or performing a structured workout, KICKR CLIMB blends physical grade changes with resistance changes to take your indoor ride to the next level. Visit our FAQs, for a full list of compatible apps.

WAHOO ELEMNT & ELEMNT BOLT COMPATIBILITY

Connect an ELEMNT or ELEMNT BOLT to your KICKR and KICKR CLIMB system to relive the ascents and descents from your favorite rides or routes while training indoors.

QUICK RELEASE AND THRU-AXLE BIKE COMPATIBILITY

In addition to standard quick release hubs KICKR CLIMB also supports 12x100, 15x100, and 15x110 thru axle hubs.

Part Number: WFBKTR5

Max Incline: 20%

Max Decline: -10%

*Exact grade changes dependent on bicycle size, wheel size and trainer type.

Compatible Trainers: New Wahoo KICKR (2017 Edition) and New KICKR SNAP (2017 Edition)

Metrics: Current Grade

Dimensions: 25.75" H x 5.1" W x 7" L

Supported Hubs: QR, 12x100, 15x100, 15x110

Wireless Software Updates: Yes

3rd Party App Compatible: Yes, when paired to a KICKR or KICKR SNAP

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
8/10

Well made.

Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10

It works really well with a compatible trainer.

Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10

I've had no issues with it during testing, but it's hard to say how it'll fare long-term.

Rate the product for value:
 
5/10

Sticking with the middle ground here. There's nothing to compare it against, and some people will think it's ridiculous, and some will be happy to pay the asking price.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

Very well. It replicates gradient changes nicely, and it's neat and easy to use.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

Does the thing it was designed to do with the minimum of fuss, simple to set up.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

Expensive, only compatible with a few trainers.

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

This is it, if you want an indoor gradient simulator.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? No

Would you recommend the product to a friend? I think they'll already know if they want one or not.

Use this box to explain your overall score

Impossible to give it a meaningful score really. It's an expensive way of doing something that some people with compatible trainers will really, really want. And it works. Some people will hate it. So it's a 1, or a 10, or somewhere in between. I've given it a 6 because it's limited in its appeal and very expensive, although it does what it's designed to do very well.

Overall rating: 6/10

About the tester

Age: 45  Height: 189cm  Weight: 92kg

I usually ride: whatever I'm testing...  My best bike is: Kinesis Tripster ATR, Merida Scultura

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: road racing, time trialling, cyclo-cross, commuting, touring, club rides, sportives, general fitness riding, fixed/singlespeed, mountain biking, Mountain Bike Bog Snorkelling, track

Dave is a founding father of road.cc and responsible for kicking the server when it breaks. In a previous life he was a graphic designer but he's also a three-time Mountain Bike Bog Snorkelling world champion, and remains unbeaten through the bog. Dave rides all sorts of bikes but tends to prefer metal ones. He's getting old is why.

29 comments

Avatar
barongreenback [146 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

Definitely too expensive for me but i can see the appeal. One relevant point on compatibility (I think this was on DCR) is that the way the axle pivots is important  - the design of the Wahoo means that it moves with the dropouts whereas using another trainer would mean the contact points rub away at the dropout. Wahoo apparently not averse to third party use but with that caveat I’d rather not take the risk. 

Avatar
MNgraveur [107 posts] 5 months ago
5 likes

seems so much simpler just to have my manservant lift and lower the bike on command.

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markovich [23 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

Maybe im missing something here but how does lifting the front of the bike up, make the ride harder, as if you were going uphill?

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njmoffat [77 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
markovich wrote:

Maybe im missing something here but how does lifting the front of the bike up, make the ride harder, as if you were going uphill?

It doesn't make it harder, (that's the job of the turbo trainer) it only makes the experience more realistic by simulating a gradient when in reality you are not on alpe d'huez but actually in a one bedroom flat in London.....

Avatar
dreamlx10 [308 posts] 5 months ago
1 like

I'm looking forward to the Wahoo Rain Simulator, as well as feeling like your going uphill with the Kickr Climb, and into a headwind with the fan thing they sell, you can simulate riding in the rain. Not recommended in your living room unless you have a drain in the floor, and definitely not recommended if you live in a flat that's not on the ground floor. Alternatively for those on a budget set the whole thing up in the bath and run the shower cold. If anyone from Wahoo is reading, that's my idea and I want a 50% share of the merchandising

Avatar
EK Spinner [180 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
dreamlx10 wrote:

I'm looking forward to the Wahoo Rain Simulator, as well as feeling like your going uphill with the Kickr Climb, and into a headwind with the fan thing they sell, you can simulate riding in the rain. Not recommended in your living room unless you have a drain in the floor, and definitely not recommended if you live in a flat that's not on the ground floor. Alternatively for those on a budget set the whole thing up in the bath and run the shower cold. If anyone from Wahoo is reading, that's my idea and I want a 50% share of the merchandising

 

Maybe the extreme realistic version will include night riding and cold tmperatures, we could call in "Riding your bike all year round"  1 

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EK Spinner [180 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

Bugger, double post crap

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CXR94Di2 [2552 posts] 5 months ago
3 likes

Ive got the  Wahoo Climb.  It really does bring another level of indoor riding to match outdoors.  Obviously Ive gone even further and run my whole setup on a homemade rocker board.  I get the sway motion and gradient all thrown in.  I can ride 3+hours on my setup without getting those sore static contact points because of the Climb and rocker.

 

There again I'm an avid indoor cyclist and dont ride UK roads from September to April.  I do go to warm climbs in winter and do this  4

https://youtu.be/7g8JFk5mGCs

Avatar
CXR94Di2 [2552 posts] 5 months ago
1 like

There is a neat setting to make the inclination correct even if you have Zwift set at 50% realism..  Look online/youtube to set it up via Wahoo app.

 

The realism setting doesnt make it easier, only moves your bikes gearing, so you can climb a 16%  with a 39*28 gearing.  If you need 300W to keep up with other riders, you dont get an easier ride with less difficulty

Avatar
dreamlx10 [308 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
CXR94Di2 wrote:

.....indoor cyclist....

 

Oxymoron

Avatar
FlyingPenguin [41 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
dreamlx10 wrote:
CXR94Di2 wrote:

.....indoor cyclist....

 

Oxymoron

 

cyclist - noun [C ]  - UK ​ /ˈsaɪ.klɪst/ US ​ /ˈsaɪ.klɪst/​ - "someone who rides a bicycle" (Cambridge Dictionary)

 

I didn't spot the reference to outdoors or indoors, did you insert it in invisible ink?

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dave atkinson [6502 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

barongreenback wrote:

The design of the Wahoo means that it moves with the dropouts whereas using another trainer would mean the contact points rub away at the dropout. Wahoo apparently not averse to third party use but with that caveat I’d rather not take the risk. 

yes, Wahoo have been in touch to say exactly that and i've updated the review to reflect it

 

 

Avatar
cougie [48 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes
CXR94Di2 wrote:

There again I'm an avid indoor cyclist and dont ride UK roads from September to April. 

 

Oh man.  That's awful. Don't you miss the open roads ?  I do use my turbo but it's as a mean to an end. Getting fitter.  I still ride all year round bar ice or snow. 

Avatar
CXR94Di2 [2552 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes
cougie wrote:
CXR94Di2 wrote:

There again I'm an avid indoor cyclist and dont ride UK roads from September to April. 

 

Oh man.  That's awful. Don't you miss the open roads ?  I do use my turbo but it's as a mean to an end. Getting fitter.  I still ride all year round bar ice or snow. 

 

No I love it, I probably ride 5-6000 miles a year, of that, I might do 4500 on the turbo.  I have a very good setup, replicating side sway and inclination.  I use Zwift, TrainerRoad, and odd occasion Bigringvr.   I prefer to ride in other countries, where its warm and traffic is downright more respectful of cyclists.

Avatar
CXR94Di2 [2552 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
FlyingPenguin wrote:
dreamlx10 wrote:
CXR94Di2 wrote:

.....indoor cyclist....

 

Oxymoron

 

cyclist - noun [C ]  - UK ​ /ˈsaɪ.klɪst/ US ​ /ˈsaɪ.klɪst/​ - "someone who rides a bicycle" (Cambridge Dictionary)

 

I didn't spot the reference to outdoors or indoors, did you insert it in invisible ink?

 

Conversely, it doesnt say that cycling is the preserve of outdoor ridingwink

Avatar
dreamlx10 [308 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
CXR94Di2 wrote:
cougie wrote:
CXR94Di2 wrote:

There again I'm an avid indoor cyclist and dont ride UK roads from September to April. 

 

Oh man.  That's awful. Don't you miss the open roads ?  I do use my turbo but it's as a mean to an end. Getting fitter.  I still ride all year round bar ice or snow. 

 

No I love it, I probably ride 5-6000 miles a year, of that, I might do 4500 on the turbo.  I have a very good setup, replicating side sway and inclination.  I use Zwift, TrainerRoad, and odd occasion Bigringvr.   I prefer to ride in other countries, where its warm and traffic is downright more respectful of cyclists.

So you only cycle for 15% of those miles ?

Avatar
don simon fbpe [2964 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes
dreamlx10 wrote:
CXR94Di2 wrote:
cougie wrote:
CXR94Di2 wrote:

There again I'm an avid indoor cyclist and dont ride UK roads from September to April. 

 

Oh man.  That's awful. Don't you miss the open roads ?  I do use my turbo but it's as a mean to an end. Getting fitter.  I still ride all year round bar ice or snow. 

 

No I love it, I probably ride 5-6000 miles a year, of that, I might do 4500 on the turbo.  I have a very good setup, replicating side sway and inclination.  I use Zwift, TrainerRoad, and odd occasion Bigringvr.   I prefer to ride in other countries, where its warm and traffic is downright more respectful of cyclists.

So you only cycle for 15% of those miles ?

Blimey Charlie! If you're going to have a punch up, could you make it over something more important?

Avatar
CXR94Di2 [2552 posts] 5 months ago
4 likes
don simon fbpe wrote:
dreamlx10 wrote:
CXR94Di2 wrote:
cougie wrote:
CXR94Di2 wrote:

There again I'm an avid indoor cyclist and dont ride UK roads from September to April. 

 

Oh man.  That's awful. Don't you miss the open roads ?  I do use my turbo but it's as a mean to an end. Getting fitter.  I still ride all year round bar ice or snow. 

 

No I love it, I probably ride 5-6000 miles a year, of that, I might do 4500 on the turbo.  I have a very good setup, replicating side sway and inclination.  I use Zwift, TrainerRoad, and odd occasion Bigringvr.   I prefer to ride in other countries, where its warm and traffic is downright more respectful of cyclists.

So you only cycle for 15% of those miles ?

Blimey Charlie! If you're going to have a punch up, could you make it over something more important?

 

I find it amusing how most folk dismiss indoor cycling as not doing any miles .  Pedals turning, Watts produced, and calories burnt, all cycling to me.   4

Avatar
Jetmans Dad [153 posts] 5 months ago
2 likes
CXR94Di2 wrote:

I find it amusing how most folk dismiss indoor cycling as not doing any miles .  Pedals turning, Watts produced, and calories burnt, all cycling to me.   4

Not to mention that, in terms of work done, you will get a better workout in 1 hour on the trainer than in 1 hour out on the road. 

If you don't ever train indoors, and would never use a turbo trainer, that's excellent. Your choice and you will hear no criticism from me over it. All those of us who like to combine some outdoor riding with plenty of turbo work through the winter (or who only turbo through winter) would ask is that our preferences are afforded the same respect. 

I've not time for "if you are not outside, it's not really cycling" snobbery ... my chain and cassette still wears out and I still need to keep the tyres inflated just the same. 

Avatar
PRSboy [490 posts] 5 months ago
1 like

Has anyone developed a purpose-built stationary bike that can do the gradient bit (both up and down) and also better simulate the movement of a bike as you get out of the saddle, sprint, corner etc?

Imagine how much more fun indoor cycling would be if it also involved cornering, descending, braking etc.

Maybe also a VR headset, so you are not just looking at a screen.

I had a go with a friend's Oculus Rift a while ago, I was surprised by the extent to which I felt like I was actually moving, even though I knew I wasnt.

Avatar
Jetmans Dad [153 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
PRSboy wrote:

Has anyone developed a purpose-built stationary bike that can do the gradient bit (both up and down) and also better simulate the movement of a bike as you get out of the saddle, sprint, corner etc?

Imagine how much more fun indoor cycling would be if it also involved cornering, descending, braking etc.

Maybe also a VR headset, so you are not just looking at a screen.

I had a go with a friend's Oculus Rift a while ago, I was surprised by the extent to which I felt like I was actually moving, even though I knew I wasnt.

During Hull's City of Culture celebrations last year, one of the installations included a stationary bike with Oculus Rift setup, so that as you pedalled, you proceeded through the city centre, past the City Hall and out towards the docks.

The environment was on rails, so you didn't get to choose where to go, but the speed increased and descreased with your pedalling and the gentle turns felt surprisingly realistic, even though you weren't physically changing position. 

It was very impressive actually, and given the presence of things like the Galactica ride at Alton Towers etc. the technology surely exists to create exactly what you describe. I imagine it would be pretty pricey though.

Zwift environments delivered via VR would be an interesting halfway house ... 

Avatar
CXR94Di2 [2552 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
PRSboy wrote:

Has anyone developed a purpose-built stationary bike that can do the gradient bit (both up and down) and also better simulate the movement of a bike as you get out of the saddle, sprint, corner etc?

Imagine how much more fun indoor cycling would be if it also involved cornering, descending, braking etc.

Maybe also a VR headset, so you are not just looking at a screen.

I had a go with a friend's Oculus Rift a while ago, I was surprised by the extent to which I felt like I was actually moving, even though I knew I wasnt.

 

I dont know about VR,  Im pretty chuffed with my own setup,full length rocker board and Wahoo Climb.  There are now rocker boards made with forward and aft motion aswell as side to side sway. 

Other than a rolling road treadmill https://www.ilovebicycling.com/treadmill-for-bikes/

A smart trainer, rocker and climb is about as near to outdoors, indoors  1

 

Avatar
fukawitribe [2802 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
Jetmans Dad wrote:

Zwift environments delivered via VR would be an interesting halfway house ... 

That actually exists and is pretty impressive apparently - think there's still some concern about VR nausea (quite common) and sweaty headsets but I imagine it'll be allowed out in public at some point

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fukawitribe [2802 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

.

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rjfrussell [521 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
dreamlx10 wrote:
CXR94Di2 wrote:

.....indoor cyclist....

 

Oxymoron

 

Moron

Avatar
dreamlx10 [308 posts] 5 months ago
1 like
rjfrussell wrote:
dreamlx10 wrote:
CXR94Di2 wrote:

.....indoor cyclist....

 

Oxymoron

 

Moron

A bit harsh

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Mathelo [23 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

"Manual control could be useful if, for example, you're doing climbing drills on TrainerRoad (which won't send gradient data to the trainer) and you want to replicate a climbing position indoors. "

It's worth pointing out that TrainerRoad does change the CLIMB position based on power required.

Avatar
fukawitribe [2802 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes
Mathelo wrote:

"Manual control could be useful if, for example, you're doing climbing drills on TrainerRoad (which won't send gradient data to the trainer) and you want to replicate a climbing position indoors. "

It's worth pointing out that TrainerRoad does change the CLIMB position based on power required.

Really ? Blimey, that's odd to say the least, sprint sessions must be interesting... not been on TR for a while but presumably that can be turned off ?

Avatar
CXR94Di2 [2552 posts] 5 months ago
0 likes

The Climb doesnt alter on TR on my setup.  You can manually adjust it