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Verdict: 
A really good all-rounder that works just as well on the commute as it does off the beaten track
Weight: 
9,150g
Contact: 

Vitus has delivered plenty of quality bikes over the last few seasons and the Substance CRX doesn't let the side down. It's an absolute cracker off-road, offering a fun yet stiff ride, plus it rolls surprisingly well on the tarmac too. Ignore that weight as well – it rides like it's a couple of kilos lighter.

  • Pros: Comfortable frame considering the stiffness; a true all-rounder
  • Cons: Tyre sidewalls leak like a sieve; gearing is a little low if you ride unladen

Ride

Having wide, high-profile tyres fitted will make even the stiffest bike feel more palatable to ride, but even with the 47mm 650B rubber pumped up to 60psi for use on the road the Vitus still deals with every road imperfection without issue.

On road rides I'd dart off down a new track I hadn't seen before and yeah, it was a bit rattly over the really rough stuff, but you could pick out that the frame and fork were doing a damn fine job of absorbing a fair amount of the vibration.

Vitus Substance CRX - riding 2.jpg

If you are spending the majority of the ride off-road, knocking that pressure down a few psi will see the Substance CRX just float over the bumps and ripples. It's a very comfortable bike to ride.

It hasn't sacrificed stiffness, though, as under acceleration or hauling yourself up steep climbs there is no flex of note and the front end is spot on when it comes to heavy braking or hard cornering.

Vitus Substance CRX - front disc brake.jpg

For the first few rides I try to avoid the road.cc extranet (the place where I see what things are on my test list, with deadlines and stuff, and product details) so that I don't see things like price and weight, so I can just get out on the bike and smash it about a bit without any preconceptions.

To say I was shocked to see that the Vitus weighs 9.15kg (20.17lb) would be an understatement, as it feels nothing like that. Against the similar 9.17kg Pinarello Grevil the Substance CRX feels nippier over multiple terrains and loads more flickable when the surface gets technical and really bumpy.

> Buyer's Guide: 22 of the best gravel and adventure bikes

Thanks to its planted feel the Vitus also felt more controllable when out of control, if you see what I mean.

Over the test period the trails around here have changed a lot, so each ride brought something new. The recent hot weather and keen winds have seen everything get drier, but with the dust being blown out between the rocks you are left with the options of threading around and over sharp, gnarly stones or through the soft, sandy trail edge.

At speed on descents you can often be switching between the two, and the effects on the handling can be quite stark. The Substance, thanks to its long wheelbase, felt totally composed allowing you to tweak things with your body weight and pedalling action.

Vitus Substance CRX - riding 3.jpg

The slick tread of the tyres also make for interesting behaviour on loose gravel, but as long as you've got a bit of talent and understanding on how the bike is likely to behave when you hit the soft pockets of small aggregate then the Vitus is really easy to control. In fact you find yourself enjoying it when the bike starts to slide out beneath you.

The Vitus could easily be pressed into commuter use during the week, and it's a joy to cruise along the back lanes or even mixing it up with the traffic in urban areas.

Vitus Substance CRX - riding 4.jpg

It's quick off the mark, and while the handling isn't as direct as a dedicated road bike, you can easily scythe your way through a typically congested city centre with ease.

It's the same when descending. Tighter, technical downhills require a bit of smooth handling and reading the road ahead to get the best out of the Substance CRX, but if you get a little out of shape the bike never feels panicked – and after all, if it does all go tits up, with these tyres you stand a pretty decent chance when you end up on the grass bank. Trust me, I know!

Frame and fork

Considering its stiffness, the Substance CRX doesn't look massively over built; true, the down tube is quite a boxy design but not massively so.

Vitus Substance CRX - down tube.jpg

The front end has a tapered head tube which adds a bit of girth and you do get a fairly chunky bottom bracket area, though Vitus has gone down the threaded route, which will please many.

Vitus Substance CRX - bottom bracket.jpg

The whole frame is made from Toray T700 carbon fibre and so is the fork, which includes a carbon steerer.

Vitus Substance CRX - fork.jpg

I quite like the paintjob; the stealthy grey and black with yellow highlights gives it a classy look while hiding all of the shapes and junctions between the tubes. It flows nicely I reckon.

Vitus Substance CRX - seat tube junction.jpg

Vitus has made sure that the Substance CRX is compatible with both 650B and 700C wheels and like many other manufacturers it has dropped the drive side chainstay to provide clearance between the wider tyres and the chainrings.

The clearance achieved is quite impressive, with the 47mm wide tyres fitted as standard leaving loads of room for full mudguards too.

Vitus Substance CRX - stays 2.jpg

There are loads of mounts too, mudguards as I've mentioned but also racks front and rear plus extra bottle mounts under the down tube.

Vitus Substance CRX - fork from front.jpg

This model is only available to buy in a 1x chainring setup but if you want to swap that out for a double ring combination the frame is drilled for a front mech and the adaptor is included.

Vitus Substance CRX - frame details.jpg

Internal cable routing is also there, which is good to see.

Vitus Substance CRX - head tube badge.jpg

When it comes to the geometry the Vitus is a little on the aggressive side for this type of bike, and taking the stack versus reach dimensions it actually mimics that of a road biased endurance bike. Things like the extended wheelbase and 50mm fork rake make it a little more subdued though, which is why it is such an adaptable bike.

Vitus Substance CRX.jpg

I really liked the position; you can ride hard in the drops or just sit up and enjoy the scenery and it just feels right, very comfortable.

Finishing kit

Vitus provides, like most brands, its own finishing kit with an alloy bar, stem, seatpost and saddle. It all does the job and if I bought this bike I don't think I'd feel hard done by. Should you feel the need, though, the frame is ripe for upgrades.

Vitus Substance CRX - stem.jpg

The Substance has a slightly shorter stem at 90mm for a bike of this size and that keeps the front end a little bit exciting, but the bar is also wider at 44cm so you have room to increase your stance for added control. The drops are flared too, which gives you a planted feel when travelling at speed.

Vitus Substance CRX - bars.jpg

I really like the shape of the saddle. It's quite minimalist for off-road but it has a fair amount of flex which helps the frame take the edge off.

Vitus Substance CRX - saddle.jpg

The gearing is taken care of by SRAM's Apex 1x groupset, with a 40-tooth chainring paired to a 10-42 cassette.

Vitus Substance CRX - drivetrain.jpg

If you are going to spend a lot of time riding the CRX unladen and on the road you might find the top gear a little low. I spent the majority of the time on the flat maxxing it out, but if seeking out routes in the back of beyond with a bag or two strapped to the frame is your thing, then it is about right I reckon.

Vitus Substance CRX - crank.jpg

The shifting gives a solid clunk as you move between sprockets so you always know you've made the shift you've asked for, and even under load the gear change is unhindered which I was quite impressed with considering the large jumps between the sprockets.

Vitus Substance CRX - rear mech.jpg

Braking is via SRAM's 160mm rotors front and rear and they work a treat. Compared to Shimano's offerings with their fins and filled in body, these look quite minimalist but they don't half do a good job.

Vitus Substance CRX - rear disc brake.jpg

Barely any bedding in process was needed, and they have loads of feel to them to make sure you stop quickly without locking up the rear.

Wheels and tyres

When it comes to the wheels, Vitus has gone for a WTB Frequency Race i23 TCS 650B rim paired to an Alex Bear Claw hub front and rear, and it is a solid build. They took the usual whack from the off-road terrain and came out unscathed.

Vitus Substance CRX - tyre amd rim.jpg

Vitus has chosen WTB tyres too, its Horizon 47mm Road Plus model. It's a full slick so struggles for grip a little on steep climbs on loose surfaces, but its width allows it to float over the gravel when the going is fast. If you're tackling various terrains like a bit of singletrack or heading out in the wet, you'll definitely need something grippier.

> Buyer's Guide: 18 of the best gravel and adventure tyres

My biggest issue, though, is that the sidewalls weep like a jilted bride! It's not the first time I've had this happen using tyres from WTB, either. It takes a good six or seven inflations to stop seeing the tubeless sealant dribbling through the porous tyre edges. 

Value

When it comes to pricing I'd say the Substance CRX does itself pretty proud. I've ridden a lot of gravel bikes this year and this is the one that I have found most balanced as an all-round package.

It's practically a kilo lighter (and feels more like 2-3kg) than the Specialized Men's Diverge which costs £2,100 with a full Shimano Tiagra groupset.

I liked the Diverge, but the Vitus delivers a more fun ride. It has a little more zip about it.

Canyon's Grail is one of the benchmarks for me out of the bikes I've ridden when it comes to fast gravel bikes and the Vitus shares a lot of its qualities. The way it handles on the loose stuff, its feedback that allows you to feel totally at one with the bike is all there.

If you want carbon in a Grail on a budget you are looking at the CF SL 7.0, which'll give you a Shimano 105 groupset and DT Swiss wheels for £1,999.99. It's a little lighter than the Vitus but you wouldn't notice it.

Conclusion

I think the Vitus is great. It probably isn't the best bike I've ridden on any single terrain but if you really want one bike to cover nearly all the possibilities it definitely needs to be on your list.

Verdict

A really good all-rounder that works just as well on the commute as it does off the beaten track

If you're thinking of buying this product using a cashback deal why not use the road.cc Top Cashback page and get some top cashback while helping to support your favourite independent cycling website

road.cc test report

Make and model: Vitus Substance CRX

Size tested: L/56cm

About the bike

List the components used to build up the bike.

From Vitus:

Frame Carbon T700-HM UD

Forks UD Full carbon Tapered Steerer

Shock N/A

Chainset SRAM APEX 1 Xsync 40T

Bottom Bracket SRAM

Shifters SRAM Apex 1X HRD

Front Derailleur n/a (braze on adapter supplied)

Rear Derailleur SRAM Apex 1X Long Cage

Cassette SRAM XG-1150 10-42T

Chain SRAM PC 1110

Rims WTB Frequency Race i23 TCS 650B Tubeless Ready

Front Hub Alex Bear Claw

Rear Hub Alex Bear Claw

Spokes Vitus

Tyres WTB Horizon 650 x 47c Road Plus TCS

Front Brake SRAM Apex HRD Flat Mount 160mm Rotors

Rear Brake SRAM Apex HRD Flat Mount 160mm Rotors

Handlebars Vitus Adventure Flared

Stem Vitus

Headset FSA

Saddle Vitus

Seatpost Vitus

Seatclamp Vitus

Tell us what the bike is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about the bike?

According to Vitus, "Whether you're looking for high speed adventure, expanding your riding possibilities, or just want to take the most direct route to work, the Vitus Substance Carbon has you covered. The Substance Carbon is the bike that will go anywhere you point it, on whatever road surface you choose.

"With a dedicated lightweight carbon frame designed to take both 700c and 650b wheels & tyres, the possibilities are endless. The Substance offers you a new way to ride.

"With a Hi-Mod T700 Toray carbon frame, tapered headtube, and full carbon forks, the Substance is born tough and light. This bike can go as hard and fast as you want it to. With the addition of mounts for luggage, mud guards and multiple bottles it's also capable of the biggest bike packing or touring adventures

"The Substance is fitted with 650b WTB Frequency wheels and big volume WTB Horizon 47c tyres. We believe 650b is the future of adventure cycling, the large outer diameter keeps your wheels rolling over bumps, whilst the added tyre volume allows you to adjust pressures depending on the terrain for grip, comfort and luggage weight. The Wheels are tubeless ready, so just install the supplied valves and add sealant if you want to run tubeless.

"The Substance CR is finished off with the versatile SRAM APEX 1 HRD groupset and Vitus finishing kit including our adventure specific flared drop bars. This gives you wide position stability for tackling off road terrain, and a comfortable road riding position you can maintain for long periods"

The Substance CRX is a quality all-rounder.

Where does this model sit in the range? Tell us briefly about the cheaper options and the more expensive options

The CRX sits at the top of the Substance range. Other than that there is the standard Substance which has a 4130 chromoly steel frame and Sora equipment for £949.99 and a flat bar version with the same build for £849.99.

Frame and fork

Overall rating for frame and fork
 
8/10

Tell us about the build quality and finish of the frame and fork?

A quality frame and fork throughout.

Tell us about the materials used in the frame and fork?

Vitus has used Toray T700 grade carbon fibre throughout.

Tell us about the geometry of the frame and fork?

The geometry is quite racy compared to some gravel/adventure bikes on the market with this L/56 model having a 72 degree head angle, 73 degree seat angle plus the head tube is only 170mm in length. A top tube of 560mm and chainstays of 435mm give a balanced 1031.8mm wheelbase, which makes it a confident handler off-road.

How was the bike in terms of height and reach? How did it compare to other bikes of the same stated size?

The stack and reach figures are exactly where I'd expect them to be on a 56cm bike of this style.

Riding the bike

Was the bike comfortable to ride? Tell us how you felt about the ride quality.

Yes, a combination of a decent frameset, large volume tyres and a flexible saddle make for a pleasant ride.

Did the bike feel stiff in the right places? Did any part of the bike feel too stiff or too flexible?

Plenty of stiffness at the front end and around the bottom bracket area.

How did the bike transfer power? Did it feel efficient?

The CRX has impressive power transfer levels. Acceleration feels quick and it climbs well too.

Was there any toe-clip overlap with the front wheel? If so was it a problem?

No.

How would you describe the steering? Was it lively neutral or unresponsive? Neutral without being dull.

Tell us some more about the handling. How did the bike feel overall? Did it do particular things well or badly?

Off-road the handling is spot on for adventure riding and long hours in the saddle, offering loads of feedback which lets you know what the tyres are doing.

Which components had the most effect (good or bad) on the bike's comfort? would you recommend any changes?

The saddle is a really nice shape.

Which components had the most effect (good or bad) on the bike's stiffness? would you recommend any changes?

All of the components work well with the stiffness of the frameset.

Which components had the most effect (good or bad) on the bike's efficiency? would you recommend any changes?

If you are doing a lot of road work or unladen riding, the gearing might be a little low when the speed increases.

Rate the bike for efficiency of power transfer:
 
9/10
Rate the bike for acceleration:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for sprinting:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for high speed stability:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for cruising speed stability:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for low speed stability:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for flat cornering:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for cornering on descents:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for climbing:
 
8/10

The drivetrain

Rate the drivetrain for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the drivetrain for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the drivetrain for weight:
 
7/10
Rate the drivetrain for value:
 
6/10

Tell us some more about the drivetrain. Anything you particularly did or didn't like? Any components which didn't work well together?

SRAM's Apex 1x groupset works well and I like the solid click of the gears up and down the cassette. The disc brakes offer great modulation too.

Wheels and tyres

Rate the wheels for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the wheels for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the wheels for weight:
 
7/10
Rate the wheels for comfort:
 
8/10
Rate the wheels for value:
 
5/10

Tell us some more about the wheels.Did they work well in the conditions you encountered? Would you change the wheels? If so what for?

Solid wheels that stand up to a lot of abuse.

Rate the tyres for performance:
 
6/10
Rate the tyres for durability:
 
7/10
Rate the tyres for weight:
 
7/10
Rate the tyres for comfort:
 
8/10
Rate the tyres for value:
 
5/10

Tell us some more about the tyres. Did they work well in the conditions you encountered? Would you change the tyres? If so what for?

Once the sidewalls seal they are good tyres for the majority of surfaces. If you spend time on loose gravel or mud you'll need something with more grip.

Controls

Rate the controls for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the controls for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the controls for weight:
 
7/10
Rate the controls for comfort:
 
7/10
Rate the controls for value:
 
5/10

Tell us some more about the controls. Any particularly good or bad components? How would the controls work for larger or smaller riders?

I liked the use of a wide, flared bar which gives a great range of hand positions wherever you are riding.

Your summary

Did you enjoy riding the bike? Yes

Would you consider buying the bike? Yes

Would you recommend the bike to a friend? Yes

How does the price compare to that of similar bikes in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

It is very well priced against bikes with a similar spec sheet and frame quality.

Rate the bike overall for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the bike overall for value:
 
8/10

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 40  Height: 180cm  Weight: 76kg

I usually ride: This month's test bike  My best bike is: B'Twin Ultra CF draped in the latest bling test components

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: time trialling, commuting, club rides, sportives, fixed/singlespeed

Stu knocked out his first road.cc review back in 2009 and since then he's chucked the best part of seventy test bikes around the West Country, a couple of them quite literally! With three alloy and two steel bikes in his fleet he's definitely a metal man (that'll be the engineering background) but is slowly warming to that modern carbon fibre stuff along with fat tyres & disc brakes.
It's not all nostalgia though, after spending the last few years in product design Stu keeps banging on about how 3D printing is going to be the next big thing and he's a sucker for a beautiful paint job too.

19 comments

Avatar
Danzxer [86 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes

If you just want the frame it looks like Dolan is using the same mould maybe even the same carbon layup for 799£ https://www.dolan-bikes.com/gravel/framesets/carbon/dolan-gxc-carbon-gravel-frameset.html.

 

Having bought a Ribble CGR SL had i known the Dolan/Vitus frame as available would properly have gone that route because of the extra mounts and standard round seatpost. The Ribble while a nice bike has some drawbacks, like no underside downtube and toptube mounts, D shape seatpost with wedge clamp and integration headset.

Avatar
Jimthebikeguy.com [260 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes

Looks killer value. Right about the tires tho, wtb stuff onto a wtb rim is oddly enough a crap combo that always takes ages to bed in. And the sidewalls wont take any great hits before they puncture.

Avatar
Jimthebikeguy.com [260 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes

Looks killer value. Right about the tires tho, wtb stuff onto a wtb rim is oddly enough a crap combo that always takes ages to bed in. And the sidewalls wont take any great hits before they puncture.

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds [3236 posts] 1 week ago
2 likes

47mm low pressure tyres fitted with a long whelbase but with a stiff frame and forks as you've mentioned, yet you can discern that the frame and forks were absorbing a "fair amount of the vibration" hahahahahahaha. Nice one.

Be honest, it was the tyres/tyre pressures that were doing the absorbing of the vibrations and a slack geo helping the overall comfort, stop with the bullshit about you being able to notice the vibration absorbing properties of a frame you've described as stiff!

Avatar
Jimthebikeguy.com [260 posts] 1 week ago
7 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

47mm low pressure tyres fitted with a long whelbase but with a stiff frame and forks as you've mentioned, yet you can discern that the frame and forks were absorbing a "fair amount of the vibration" hahahahahahaha. Nice one.

Be honest, it was the tyres/tyre pressures that were doing the absorbing of the vibrations and a slack geo helping the overall comfort, stop with the bullshit about you being able to notice the vibration absorbing properties of a frame you've described as stiff!

There is no need to be so abusive. Read the review, enjoy it, respect the work that has gone into it, remember its just a bike; or stop reading the site if it isn't your thing. But posting snippy stuff like that just makes the writers life a misery. Why do it?

Avatar
Sniffer [638 posts] 1 week ago
6 likes
Jimthebikeguy.com wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

47mm low pressure tyres fitted with a long whelbase but with a stiff frame and forks as you've mentioned, yet you can discern that the frame and forks were absorbing a "fair amount of the vibration" hahahahahahaha. Nice one.

Be honest, it was the tyres/tyre pressures that were doing the absorbing of the vibrations and a slack geo helping the overall comfort, stop with the bullshit about you being able to notice the vibration absorbing properties of a frame you've described as stiff!

There is no need to be so abusive. Read the review, enjoy it, respect the work that has gone into it, remember its just a bike; or stop reading the site if it isn't your thing. But posting snippy stuff like that just makes the writers life a misery. Why do it?

 

That is a positive post by BTBS by his his standard.

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds [3236 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes
Jimthebikeguy.com wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

47mm low pressure tyres fitted with a long whelbase but with a stiff frame and forks as you've mentioned, yet you can discern that the frame and forks were absorbing a "fair amount of the vibration" hahahahahahaha. Nice one.

Be honest, it was the tyres/tyre pressures that were doing the absorbing of the vibrations and a slack geo helping the overall comfort, stop with the bullshit about you being able to notice the vibration absorbing properties of a frame you've described as stiff!

There is no need to be so abusive. Read the review, enjoy it, respect the work that has gone into it, remember its just a bike; or stop reading the site if it isn't your thing. But posting snippy stuff like that just makes the writers life a misery. Why do it?

Abusive, you mean exposing pony that reviewers state about something when it's clearly and utterly wrong. Remember people are buying on the basis of reviews, telling outright porkies AKA bullshit regarding a very subjective matter in the first instance and that comment actually contradicting what they've said about the frame being stiff as well as ignoring the fact that lowered tyre pressures on a very wide tyre is going to be doing the cushioing/vibration absorbing from the terrain.

It's not making the writers life a misery, it's about telling them to stop saying stuff that is patently not true nor accurate, to stop them from contradicting themselves and to look more closely as to why they 'feel' certain things instead of making up stuff we know cannot be true by definition of their own words and what we know as cyclists ourselves.

Stop being a petal!

Avatar
dave atkinson [6516 posts] 1 week ago
11 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

47mm low pressure tyres fitted with a long whelbase but with a stiff frame and forks as you've mentioned, yet you can discern that the frame and forks were absorbing a "fair amount of the vibration" hahahahahahaha. Nice one.

Be honest, it was the tyres/tyre pressures that were doing the absorbing of the vibrations and a slack geo helping the overall comfort, stop with the bullshit about you being able to notice the vibration absorbing properties of a frame you've described as stiff!

well there's a few things to say really. firstly, obviously, that stu's reviewed scores of bikes for us and has more experience of what different bikes feel like, and where the differences are, than most people. secondly, when he's riding on road stu pumps up his tyres absolutely as hard as they'll go, partly to try and discern the effect of the frame on the ride but mostly because that's just the way he likes things. thirdly, that the stiffness in the frame that stu is talking about is the stiffness you want: bottom bracket to to rear wheel, and in the direction of steering traction. making that happen while retaining some vibration absorption in the other plane to soak up a bit of the surface buzz is, and always has been, one of the goals of frame design; they're not mutually exclusive goals. fourthly you're contradicting your own argument: if the frame and fork have no impact on comfort then relaxing the head angle isn't going to make a bike more comfortable.

Avatar
riggbeck [10 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes

"but as long as you've got a bit of talent and understanding on how the bike is likely to behave when you hit the soft pockets of small aggregate then the Vitus is really easy to control"....... Been meaning to ask this for a while, which road cc staffer was it that I saw completely wash out riding a CX bike on the Eurobike demo track a few years ago? (Was a wet left hander on the road going into the woods.)

Avatar
Mungecrundle [1484 posts] 1 week ago
2 likes
dave atkinson wrote:
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

47mm low pressure tyres fitted with a long whelbase but with a stiff frame and forks as you've mentioned, yet you can discern that the frame and forks were absorbing a "fair amount of the vibration" hahahahahahaha. Nice one.

Be honest, it was the tyres/tyre pressures that were doing the absorbing of the vibrations and a slack geo helping the overall comfort, stop with the bullshit about you being able to notice the vibration absorbing properties of a frame you've described as stiff!

well there's a few things to say really. firstly, obviously, that stu's reviewed scores of bikes for us and has more experience of what different bikes feel like, and where the differences are, than most people. secondly, when he's riding on road stu pumps up his tyres absolutely as hard as they'll go, partly to try and discern the effect of the frame on the ride but mostly because that's just the way he likes things. thirdly, that the stiffness in the frame that stu is talking about is the stiffness you want: bottom bracket to to rear wheel, and in the direction of steering traction. making that happen while retaining some vibration absorption in the other plane to soak up a bit of the surface buzz is, and always has been, one of the goals of frame design; they're not mutually exclusive goals. fourthly you're contradicting your own argument: if the frame and fork have no impact on comfort then relaxing the head angle isn't going to make a bike more comfortable.

I reckon you are missing a trick here. Why bother to actually ride the bikes or use the stuff you get sent for review when you could save a shed load of time, effort and cake related expenses by just writing about how you think it will work based on your own prejudices and preconceptions?

Avatar
dave atkinson [6516 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes
riggbeck wrote:

"but as long as you've got a bit of talent and understanding on how the bike is likely to behave when you hit the soft pockets of small aggregate then the Vitus is really easy to control"....... Been meaning to ask this for a while, which road cc staffer was it that I saw completely wash out riding a CX bike on the Eurobike demo track a few years ago? (Was a wet left hander on the road going into the woods.)

not sure. it wasn't stu though  1

It could have been me, i don't remember doing it but that's not to say i didn't...

Avatar
Rapha Nadal [1092 posts] 1 week ago
1 like
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

47mm low pressure tyres fitted with a long whelbase but with a stiff frame and forks as you've mentioned, yet you can discern that the frame and forks were absorbing a "fair amount of the vibration" hahahahahahaha. Nice one.

Be honest, it was the tyres/tyre pressures that were doing the absorbing of the vibrations and a slack geo helping the overall comfort, stop with the bullshit about you being able to notice the vibration absorbing properties of a frame you've described as stiff!

Good Lord, man.  Face; meet palm.

Avatar
riggbeck [10 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes
dave atkinson wrote:
riggbeck wrote:

"but as long as you've got a bit of talent and understanding on how the bike is likely to behave when you hit the soft pockets of small aggregate then the Vitus is really easy to control"....... Been meaning to ask this for a while, which road cc staffer was it that I saw completely wash out riding a CX bike on the Eurobike demo track a few years ago? (Was a wet left hander on the road going into the woods.)

not sure. it wasn't stu though  1

It could have been me, i don't remember doing it but that's not to say i didn't...

It wasn't you, its many years since but we have actually met quite a few times before.  1 Who ever it was in full road cc garb would remember it, good length slide followed by straightening of a shifter and a furtive look to see if anyone was watching.

Avatar
Disfunctional_T... [420 posts] 1 week ago
0 likes

I assume the bottom bracket is BB86 (which seems to be the default for these open mold type frames). Horrible choice if you want to run cranks with 30 mm spindles (which a lot of gravel-oriented cranksets are). BSA or BB386EVO please.

Avatar
Jimthebikeguy.com [260 posts] 1 week ago
4 likes
Disfunctional_Threshold wrote:

I assume the bottom bracket is BB86 (which seems to be the default for these open mold type frames). Horrible choice if you want to run cranks with 30 mm spindles (which a lot of gravel-oriented cranksets are). BSA or BB386EVO please.

Its threaded, read the review.

Avatar
riggbeck [10 posts] 1 week ago
2 likes
Jimthebikeguy.com wrote:
Disfunctional_Threshold wrote:

I assume the bottom bracket is BB86 (which seems to be the default for these open mold type frames). Horrible choice if you want to run cranks with 30 mm spindles (which a lot of gravel-oriented cranksets are). BSA or BB386EVO please.

Its threaded, read the review.

Or just look at the pictures with the review.

Avatar
Disfunctional_T... [420 posts] 1 week ago
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Apologies. I did search the article for BSA, BB86 and checked the product pages before I posted, but didn't find anything.

The front centre distance is enough for 28 mm tires... Certainly not suitable for 47 mm tires though, IMHO.

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brianlescargot [15 posts] 1 week ago
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I’ve had 2 Vitus bike frames fail on me in the last year, first snapped on the seat tube and second time the dropout snapped clean off taking part of the frame with it. Second time round CRC refused my warranty claim despite getting an independent Cytech report to show that the frame failure was a design issue. 

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n0tanidi0t [8 posts] 5 days ago
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brianlescargot wrote:

I’ve had 2 Vitus bike frames fail on me in the last year, first snapped on the seat tube and second time the dropout snapped clean off taking part of the frame with it. Second time round CRC refused my warranty claim despite getting an independent Cytech report to show that the frame failure was a design issue. 

 

Was seriously considering one of these until I saw your comment! Sorry to hear they won't honour your warranty claim - can you give us any more info about the failures? Was it a cyclocross frame as well?