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Just in: Sensa Giulia G2

New aero carbon road bike available from Merlin Cycles lands in the road.cc bike shed

This is the brand new Sensa Giulia G2, described by the Dutch bike company as being lighter, comfier and more aero than the bike it replaced when it was launched last November. We’ve got the bike in for review so we can put those claims to the test. 

Brought into the UK exclusively by Merlin Cycles, the Giulia G2 range kicks off with this Shimano Ultegra 6800 model, which is currently priced at £1,530 (it’s normally £1,699). There are five sizes to choose from, we’ve got the 61cm, the biggest size in the range because Dave Atkinson is testing it. And he’s a tall chap. 

So what is the Sensa Giulia G2 all about then? It’s described as an all-rounder, suitable for road racing or sportives, or just bashing around the country lanes at the weekend. You get a full carbon fibre frame and fork with internal cable routing and a tapered head tube, all very modern details. Claimed frame weight for a 56cm is 960g, a decent if not startling weight.

The frame has size-specific geometry and tube dimensions which mean that Sensa has thought about the different requirements of someone riding the 61cm frame compared to someone on the 50cm, the smallest frame size on offer. As well as the geometry being tailored for each frame size, the crank lengths are specific too. This one has 175mm crank arms. 

Let’s give you some numbers. This 61cm bike has a 591mm effective top tube, 205mm head tube, 1012mm wheelbase, 402mm reach and 607mm stack. It strikes a happy balance between someone wanting the bike for racing or more relaxed distance cycling. 

It’s not an out-and-out aero bike, but with aerodynamics informing the design of an increasing number of road bikes, components and even clothing, Sensa has given the new Giulia G2 some clear aero tweaks. 

Most notable is the new Smooth AirFlow fork. The fork blades are flat and wide and the crown is slightly recessed into the down tube. The down tube is also narrower and the top headset cap is recessed into the head tube. They’re heavier than the previous fork used on the old Giulia, but the overall frameset weight is lower because of savings in the frame.

The slender seatstays, meanwhile, suggest comfort and compliance have been a design factor as well. There is also increased tyre clearance in this new version, and you can fit up to 25mm tyres. That might seem a little narrow by today’s rapidly changing trends, but it’s likely they’ll be just fine for the sort of fast-paced riding this bike is clearly designed for. 

Sensa is a competitive brand when it comes to value for money, a fact helped by buying direct from Merlin Cycles.  This bike is shod with a complete Shimano Ultegra 6800 mechanical groupset with a 52/36 chainset and 11-28 cassette. You can upgrade to Di2 if you’re feeling flush, that bike costs £1,965. There are two Dura-Ace versions as well.

Back to our test bike. It’s specified with lots of Sensa’s own-brand Supra equipment; an aluminium wing-shaped handlebar, stem and seatpost and Supra RCA 55 Elite carbon clincher wheels, a PRICE upgrade over the stock aluminium wheels. They're fitted with Schwalbe One tyres. There’s  known San Marco Aspide saddle. The complete bike weight is 8.1kg (17.85lb).

“Creating a successor for the beloved Giulia Sensa have set the bar high. Keeping all that was good, yet dropping weight, adding comfort and making it more aerodynamic. The New Giulia G2 is stiff enough for a proper racer and light enough to fly up mountains. Stable enough to decent as fast as you dare but yet comfy enough to finish any Grand Fondo. With the newly designed Geometry every frame size offers clearance for a wider tyre,” says the company. 

We’ll find out if that is the case when it hits the road, so it’s over to Dave for the upcoming review.

- Review: Sensa Aquila SL road bike

More at www.merlincycles.com

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

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