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Supersapiens launches Energy Band to give real-time glucose data and help you maximise performance

Energy Band is the world’s first wearable device built specifically for sports performance that displays glucose data directly from Abbott’s biosensor

Supersapiens has announced a new wearable device called the Energy Band that, in conjunction with Abbott’s Libre Sense Glucose Sport Biosensor, can display your glucose data in real-time on your wrist or handlebar as you exercise without the need to go through a smartphone.

The existing Abbott Libre Sense glucose bio sport sensor attaches to the back of your arm and can be worn for up to 14 days. Previously, you could get the data on Supersapiens’ smartphone app on your phone, or have the app stream the info to some Garmin devices

Supersapiens says that its Energy Band, Version Zero, “is the first and only wearable device that can read sport glucose data directly from Abbott’s Libre Sense”, communicating via Bluetooth. Other compatible devices need your smartphone to act as a data bridge.

The idea is that you can use this information to manage your fuelling while exercising to sustain high-intensity work and avoid fatigue caused by low glucose levels. You can also manage glucose levels to maximise your recovery and, Supersapiens says, ultimately achieve greater performance gains.

The Energy Band displays current glucose values along with a trend arrow. By tapping on the side you can see different stats, including your daily glucose exposure and tracking against your daily goal.

The Energy Band is said to be easy to read thanks to an eight colour LCD and is water-resistant up to 50 meters (5 ATM). It runs off a lithium-ion battery and is fully rechargeable in about three hours, although it doesn't offer watch or heart rate functions.

The Supersapiens Energy Band is available at supersapiens.com for €159 (about £137).

Get details on buying an Abbott Libre Sense glucose bio sport sensor here

Mat has been in cycling media since 1996, on titles including BikeRadar, Total Bike, Total Mountain Bike, What Mountain Bike and Mountain Biking UK, and he has been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. Mat has been road.cc technical editor for over a decade, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. We send him off around the world to get all the news from launches and shows too. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer. Now over 50, he's riding road and gravel bikes most days for fun and fitness rather than training for competitions.

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9 comments

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peted76 | 2 years ago
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This needs testing ASAP.. could be a total game changer for competitive and serious long distance riders.

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wtjs replied to peted76 | 2 years ago
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This needs testing ASAP..

More specifically, it needs proper testing for accuracy. They must already have loads of data for a clinical device, but that may not be applicable to people riding around bumpy roads on a bike. I would get one if it really worked (for the entertainment, not because my abilities warrant it) but the rash of worthless crap sensors that don't work on Fitbits etc. (there's now some rubbishy stress sensor when the functions you actually want to work, like the pulse sensor, don't) leads me to be suspicious. 

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EddyBerckx | 2 years ago
1 like

I wish Abbott would do this for their normal (diabetic) glucose sensor. Currently diabetics around the world are using an aftermarket (unsupported and unlicensed) product that goes over the sensor and sends a Bluetooth signal to your phone and watch. Fantastic on bike rides as you don't have to stop and scan your arm - you just look at your watch.

 

 

 

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AidanR replied to EddyBerckx | 2 years ago
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The Libre 2 has Bluetooth, and is available on the NHS (at least in some parts), so you don't have to use the MiaoMiao.

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EddyBerckx replied to AidanR | 2 years ago
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AidanR wrote:

The Libre 2 has Bluetooth, and is available on the NHS (at least in some parts), so you don't have to use the MiaoMiao.

Yeah I should be switching to this soon. The weird about the 2 though is it only warns you about highs or lows, you can't see realtime data or trends...may still be useful on a bike if I set the low alarm to a level where I'd normally reach for the gels (to pre-empt a low).

The freestlye libre 3 looks awesome, though not sure if it'll ever be available on the NHS. It's a proper continuous gluscose monitor (can be used with a pump too) and is about half the size of the ones currently out

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AidanR replied to EddyBerckx | 2 years ago
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The 3 does sound good!

Another problem with the 2 is that the app only sounds an alarm when you first go high or low - if you ignore or miss that, it doesn't sound again.

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Zazz53 | 2 years ago
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As the owner of a pancreas that gave up a few years ago the sensors are a game changer but agree this would be better a a widget on my smart watch

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bertisfantastic | 2 years ago
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As the owner of a working pancreas I'm inclined not to bother

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Secret_squirrel | 2 years ago
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Um...why on earth should I need a "band" when it should be possible to send the data to my Apple/Android/Garmin smart watch?  I can see why GPS units might be problematic (too many manufacturers, a custom BT or Ant profile needed) but not a smart watch.

Seems like a waste of the companies limited Product development cash to me.  A bung of some cash to Garmin to get in on their Eco system might have been better.

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