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PSPOs for Pavement Parking?

Just musing.

Is there any reason why a Public Spaces Protection Order cannot (apart from local politics and motohoon squealing) be used to control pavement parking across a community, by criminalising it?

I can't see any reason why not:

1 - Areas pedestrianised using PSPOs already exclude routine parking.
2 - PSPOs already sometimes apply right across Council Areas.

And Pavement Parking afaics meets the required criteria:

• activities that have taken place have had a detrimental effect on the quality of life of those in the locality, or it is likely that activities will take place and that they will have a detrimental effect
• the effect or likely effect of these activities: ◦ is, or is likely to be, persistent or continuing in nature ◦ is, or is likely to be, unreasonable
◦ justifies the restrictions being imposed. (https://www.local.gov.uk/sites/default/files/documents/10.21%20PSPO%20gu...)

Have PSPOs been used to restrict parking around schools, for example?
 

If you're new please join in and if you have questions pop them below and the forum regulars will answer as best we can.

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12 comments

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dubwise | 3 months ago
8 likes

In Scotland, a bill was passed banning pavement parking and was due to implemented in 2021. It was subsequently pushed back to 2023.

So far nothing, though in the past week it was raised by an msp to be introduced in Glasgow. The backlash was predictable.

The howls regarding people cycling on pavements gets louder and louder but the same ones are against banning pavement parking.

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mattw replied to dubwise | 3 months ago
4 likes

I think Edinburgh are in the vanguard on this for implementation.

There's a fair amount that's good about it, but imo they've flunked (in the legislation - not Edinburgh Council) a couple of crucial points which are now flunked for the long term.

One is that afaics the required minimum pedestrian width to be left is 1.5m in the law not 2m or 2.4m. 1.5m is the "minimum" not the "recommended minimum" (which is 2m) in the national Inclusive Mobility best practice guidelines section 4.2. So that is the usual "minimum possible" masquerading as lots of progress, but not actually reaching the bar.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/61d32bb7d3bf7f1f72b5ffd2/...

That means that SOP may be pavement parking narrowing it to 1.5m, ignoring obtructions such as lamp posts etc. 1.5m is not enough for 2 wheelchairs to pass each other; that would require 2.5m. Imagine a row of 60m of cars (ie 10) and you see the problem.

Another one is that a couple of exemptions are too generous imo - delivery vehicles for one.

But we'll see.

MattW
 

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chrisonabike replied to mattw | 3 months ago
1 like

There are quite a few bad habits that need fixed here - not sure just how far "popular understanding" can be changed without a great deal of feedback (eg more enforcement).

Having said that I'm alright, Jack - I just mutter at some thoughtless* parking every time I'm out. But for some it means not knowing if you can actually complete a journey without a detour - that's why this needs tackled. As well as general nuisance to *everyone* walking.

We'll see!

* But not infrequently technically legal - too many exemptions in rules / deficient "infra".

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mattw | 3 months ago
1 like

Supplementary

Are Broxbourne Council a Local Highways Authority?

If not, does that mean that a District Council can do this?

Ooooooohhhh !!!

Avatar
Tom_77 | 3 months ago
1 like
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mattw replied to Tom_77 | 3 months ago
1 like

Supplementary

Are Broxbourne Council a Local Highways Authority?

If not, does that mean that a District Council can do this?

Ooooooohhhh !!!

Avatar
Tom_77 replied to mattw | 3 months ago
0 likes
mattw wrote:

Supplementary

Are Broxbourne Council a Local Highways Authority?

If not, does that mean that a District Council can do this?

Ooooooohhhh !!!

There are limitations on creating a PSPO that restricts a public right of way over a highway (see Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014). But AIUI a right of way is the right to pass over someone's land and does not include the right to park on it, also a footway (pavement) is generally something that the public have a right of way over while travelling on foot only.

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mattw replied to Tom_77 | 3 months ago
0 likes

I don't know it to a level of detail to answer that, I'm afraid.

But in practice restricting cycling on a public highway in a town centre seems to happen, does it not?

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brooksby | 3 months ago
5 likes

It would be a good idea, but I don't think Central Govt wants local govt to be able to do things like any more… "wAR on the MotorisT", innit?

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mattw replied to brooksby | 3 months ago
1 like

Don't know - they have loosened up restrictions on PSPO introduction as I understand it. But that was under David Cameron.

But they seem to want to give more power to the various Captain Mainwarings trying to recreate Walmington-on-Sea circa 1954.

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wtjs replied to mattw | 3 months ago
4 likes

But they seem to want to give more power to the various Captain Mainwarings trying to recreate Walmington-on-Sea circa 1954

Yes! Invoke the Dunkirk spirit against the relentless waves of entitled lycra-clad Terror-Radfahrer, pouring down the virtually unused monumentally expensive cycle lanes which cause traffic jams and pollution while they collide with countless wheelchairs, and restore the traditional British right to drive on empty roads to park facing the sea and scoff

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mattw replied to wtjs | 3 months ago
3 likes

Indeedy-doody.

Wehrmacht, 1944, counter-attacking at Arnhem.

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