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TfL working with police to keep motorists off Cycle Superhighways

Transport body says it may take time for everyone to get used to infrastructure

Transport for London (TfL) has told road.cc that it is working with the Metropolitan Police to ensure motorists stay off the capital’s Cycle Superhighways – but says it could take time for everyone to get used to the infrastructure being rolled out in the city.

A picture posted to Twitter by Alec James on Sunday showed a car tailgating him on a section of the North-South Cycle Superhighway across the road from TfL’s headquarters in Southwark.

Another cyclist, SW19cam, shared footage on YouTube similarly showing motor vehicles being driven on one of the routes, despite signage clearly showing they are for bicycles only.

Nigel Hardy, TfL’s head of sponsorship for surface transport, commented: “The Cycle Superhighways are transforming the look-and-feel of London’s roads, making them significantly safer and bringing us up-to-speed with the likes of Amsterdam and Copenhagen.

“We expect it to take time before all road users become accustomed to radical changes, such as bi-directional cycle tracks, on major roads in a world city.‎

“Isolated incidents of motorists using the new segregated lanes have been brought to our attention and, working alongside the Met Police, we have an extensive education and enforcement campaign aimed at preventing this.

“We'll consider further measures if this persists,” he added.

While the reference to people needing time to get used to the Cycle Superhighways seems to relate to motorists who up on them by mistake, Mr James said on Sunday that he believed the driver of the vehicle he took a picture of knew what he was doing.

In an exchange on Twitter with Carlton Reid, Roads Were Not Built For Cars author and executive editor of BikeBiz he said the person was “certainly driving like they knew it,” adding, you “can do pretty much what you like on the roads on Sunday evening.”

Simon joined road.cc as news editor in 2009 and is now the site’s community editor, acting as a link between the team producing the content and our readers. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, he has reported on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, the latest developments in the bike industry and the sport’s biggest races. Now back in London full-time after 15 years living in Oxford and Cambridge, he loves cycling along the Thames but misses having his former riding buddy, Elodie the miniature schnauzer, in the basket in front of him.

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7 comments

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quiff | 8 years ago
0 likes

A bit off topic, but if the "picture posted to Twitter by Alec James on Sunday" is the one at the top of this piece, then does it really show "a car tailgating him"? Or just "a car following him"?

Sure, demonise the guy for driving on a cycle superhighway (assuming it was intentional), but I'm not sure the emotive language about his following distance is fair - compare the bus and the Golf in the next lane. Of course he could have backed off when Mr James stopped to take a photo.  

Avatar
pockstone | 8 years ago
1 like

We're already paying good money.....just not seeing it for some reason.

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wycombewheeler | 8 years ago
6 likes

seems pretty simple, just takes two officers to wait halfway along the cycleway stopping cars and issuing £60 fines, exactly as they do to cyclists using the wrong paths in the royal parks.

Avatar
STiG911 replied to wycombewheeler | 8 years ago
5 likes
wycombewheeler wrote:

seems pretty simple, just takes two officers to wait halfway along the cycleway stopping cars and issuing £60 fines, exactly as they do to cyclists using the wrong paths in the royal parks.

 

I think we'd all pay good money to see that.

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ofathens | 8 years ago
2 likes

I won't believe that anyone would do this accidentally and anybody who does deserves a massive fine.

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Peowpeowpeowlasers | 8 years ago
1 like

Most of the off-road cycle tracks around here (former railways) have huge great aluminium barriers at regular intervals.  You know the sort, the annoying as hell "wheelchairs and trikes not allowed" things that are generally completely pointless.

It's funny how on the tracks that cars would never go on, because they'd get stuck, these barriers are regularly used.  But on tracks that cars can easily drive on, presumably because their drivers are confused or just lazy, they're not used.

I'm not drawing any conclusions, I just think it's a good way to highlight how those in power think about cycling.

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FluffyKittenofT... replied to Peowpeowpeowlasers | 8 years ago
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Peowpeowpeowlasers wrote:

Most of the off-road cycle tracks around here (former railways) have huge great aluminium barriers at regular intervals.  You know the sort, the annoying as hell "wheelchairs and trikes not allowed" things that are generally completely pointless.

It's funny how on the tracks that cars would never go on, because they'd get stuck, these barriers are regularly used.  But on tracks that cars can easily drive on, presumably because their drivers are confused or just lazy, they're not used.

I'm not drawing any conclusions, I just think it's a good way to highlight how those in power think about cycling.

Those are more about motorbikes/quadbikes though, no?

The answer, as for the problem in the article, is computer controlled auto-cannon turrets that can recognise an errant vehicle. "Citizen! You have strayed into a restricted route! Please remove your vehicle! You have 10 seconds to comply"...sound of turret rotating...

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