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Warning that cycling could be banned if people don’t ride responsibly this weekend

‘Make sure bikes continue to be seen to be part of the solution to this crisis’ – Chris Boardman

British Cycling has warned that the ‘privilege’ of riding a bike could be removed if people fail to observe instructions on social distancing this weekend.

In an open letter published on Friday night, British Cycling CEO Julie Harrington said it was “heartening” that the Government had so far protected people’s right to ride a bike, but warned that this must not be taken for granted.

Government advice on staying at home currently lists as an exception, “one form of exercise a day, for example a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household.”

It goes on to say that, “even when doing these activities, you should be minimising time spent outside of the home and ensuring you are 2 metres apart from anyone outside of your household.”

Despite this, some have undertaken group rides or arranged to meet friends midway through a ride. Others have used their daily ride to cover great distances, arguing that the guidelines don’t specify a time limit.

Daily exercise rules: current cycling dos and don'ts

Harrington said: "People on bikes were not the only culprits in last weekend's mass dash to the outdoors but, despite strong guidance from ourselves and others, too many chose to ignore the Prime Minister's instructions on social distancing, continuing to ride in groups and meet in cafes for a mid-ride chat.

"This isn't just irresponsible, it is putting people's lives at risk. A repeat of that this weekend risks further Government measures to take away the privilege of riding a bike for all of us and now more than ever, it is not one we can afford to lose."

Greater Manchester’s cycling commissioner, Chris Boardman, urged people to, “make sure bikes continue to be a part of the solution to this crisis, and are seen to be part of the solution.”  

After highlighting key workers’ use of bikes for essential journeys, he said: “For the rest of us, [bikes] are a way to go and get supplies, take essential exercise and, crucially, give us a mental break each day, helping us ensure prolonged isolation is actually sustainable.

“But for bikes to remain a force for good and help us get through this, this is how it’s got to work: only ride alone or with people that you live with and stay at least two metres away from anybody that you meet. Do not, under any circumstances, ride in a group.

“As per government instructions, only go out once [to exercise] each day. And finally, be sensible. Only ride on routes that you know well and that are well within your ability.”

He advised people to, “obey these rules as if your life, and the lives of others, depend on it – because they do.”

Alex has written for more cricket publications than the rest of the road.cc team combined. Despite the apparent evidence of this picture, he doesn't especially like cake.

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53 comments

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mdavidford replied to Morat | 3 years ago
0 likes
Morat wrote:
mdavidford wrote:
Brightspark wrote:

Because banning is easy and removes ambiguity Cyclists already have poor reputation and some of us just don't get why. Just witnessed from my window a cyclist stop and have a piss by the side of the road. DIRTY, DIRTY, DIRTY CYCLIST. Me? I am hanging up the wheels for now. Will they ever come down again?

If it had been someone who'd got out of their car to urinate at the side of the road, no-one would be saying 'DIRTY, DIRTY, DIRTY MOTORIST - giving motorists a poor reputation.'

This behaviour isn't why cyclists have a poor reputation. That reputation already exists because of ingrained prejudice. People who hold that prejudice just jump on examples like this, apply their confirmation bias, and use it to retroactively 'justify' their prejudice.

There's no excuse for pissing in the street, no matter what form of transport you use. If you're on a ride and need to go, find somewhere discreet.

It really is that simple.

I never suggested that there was any excuse for that. Perhaps you replied to the wrong post by mistake?

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peter101cycle replied to Brightspark | 3 years ago
2 likes

So if there's no cafe's open, how is a cyclist supposed to have a piss?  Twat

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handlebarcam replied to peter101cycle | 3 years ago
4 likes

Here's a little tip: responding to someone making generalizations about the civility of a group with which you identify by posting a comment ending in the word "twat" is rather self-defeating. For an example of how to reply with courtesy and intelligence, see mdavidford's excellent post above.

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goggy replied to peter101cycle | 3 years ago
3 likes

Not go out for long enough that they need one?

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gsk82 replied to peter101cycle | 3 years ago
0 likes

Exactly, unless they have male genitals. Dick.

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peter101cycle replied to Brightspark | 3 years ago
0 likes

So if there's no cafe's open, how is a cyclist supposed to have a piss?  Twat

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Brightspark replied to peter101cycle | 3 years ago
7 likes
peter101cycle wrote:

So if there's no cafe's open, how is a cyclist supposed to have a piss?  Twat

Why is a cyclist so far from home that he has to stop for a piss?

If he has a urinal problem then he should have planned for his comfort stop knowing that cafes and public toilets are closed.

CV19 is easily passed on. So no spitting or snot balls, as mentioned elsewhere on this site. Did they have to spell it out in big letters for you - here it is DON'T LEAVE BODY FLUIDS BY THE ROAD and poo's tissues used face masks and gloves. 

If you look back at previous anti cycling stories you will find that there are often complaints from the public about cyclists urinating in public or in gardens.

In my former role, I had to do a lot of damage limitation to prevent the loss of timetrial courses in the district because of this problem. 

"Mummy what are those men doing in our garden?"

And yes I would call out DIRTY, DIRTY DIRTY Motorist or runner or anyone, especially at this time. BUT, this is a cyling forum and cyclists are in the spotlight and if we wish to continue to enjoy cycling then we have to be better than everyone else. Because if we don't then we will be hung out to dry.

Yours MR TWAT.

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ktache replied to Brightspark | 3 years ago
3 likes

I don't know if urine is much of a problem with Covid 19, this is an upper respiritory tract infection isn't it, breathing, coughing and sneezing, contact with formites, these are recognised transmission routes. 

Cats and dogs peep and poop everywhere don't they, some responsible dog owners do clear up most of the poop, but traces will always be left behind, and a minority of those give us the incredibly named dog s**t chandelier, though this is an exanple of it's counterpart the dog s**t maypole.

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Sniffer replied to ktache | 3 years ago
6 likes

A healthy prsons urine is sterile.

I douby Covod -19 changes that. That is not how you are going to transmit it.

 

 

 

 

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Jimmy on wheels replied to Brightspark | 3 years ago
3 likes
Brightspark wrote:

Why is a cyclist so far from home that he has to stop for a piss?

If he has a urinal problem then he should have planned for his comfort stop knowing that cafes and public toilets are closed.

CV19 is easily passed on. So no spitting or snot balls, as mentioned elsewhere on this site. Did they have to spell it out in big letters for you - here it is DON'T LEAVE BODY FLUIDS BY THE ROAD and poo's tissues used face masks and gloves. 

Maybe because for a good work out (as in what you would do normally, like they recommend), you need to go a good distance from your house, especially if you're to find quiet roads where you can cycle in isolation and not be harrassed by too many cars doing 100 mph (because the police are too busy asking households to disperse pointlessly).
60 miles is an ordinary weekend ride length for many people, so you could be 30 miles away from home when you feel the need to take a leek. If you're actually in the middle of nowhere (of course don't do it in a village or into someone's garden), and take a leek in some trees, the chaces of anyone touching the ground where you pissed in in the next few days is so incredibly small.

And if you get 5 miles out, need to go, go home, that's your exercise for the day and you're not allowed to go out again, so of course people are going to keep going till they can find a secluded spot for a slash.

As for spitting, if a fly flies in my mouth, I'm going to spit it out. Sorry, that's just how it its. My advice would be you should really stop licking the road and the verge while there's a virus going around, at the best of times that's pretty gross!

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imajez replied to Jimmy on wheels | 3 years ago
0 likes
Jimmy on wheels wrote:

As for spitting, if a fly flies in my mouth, I'm going to spit it out. Sorry, that's just how it its.

On that subject, it's quite hard to stay veggie/vegan at monemt whilst cycling along paths with trees either side with sections on path where it suddenly  feels like its raining due to number of bugs hovering in gangs. 
Spit, spit, bleargh!!!
This is also why I always wear glasses when riding. Bugs in eyes are way worse.

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keirik replied to Jimmy on wheels | 3 years ago
6 likes
Jimmy on wheels wrote:
Brightspark wrote:

Why is a cyclist so far from home that he has to stop for a piss?

If he has a urinal problem then he should have planned for his comfort stop knowing that cafes and public toilets are closed.

CV19 is easily passed on. So no spitting or snot balls, as mentioned elsewhere on this site. Did they have to spell it out in big letters for you - here it is DON'T LEAVE BODY FLUIDS BY THE ROAD and poo's tissues used face masks and gloves. 

Maybe because for a good work out (as in what you would do normally, like they recommend), you need to go a good distance from your house, especially if you're to find quiet roads where you can cycle in isolation and not be harrassed by too many cars doing 100 mph (because the police are too busy asking households to disperse pointlessly).
60 miles is an ordinary weekend ride length for many people, so you could be 30 miles away from home when you feel the need to take a leek. If you're actually in the middle of nowhere (of course don't do it in a village or into someone's garden), and take a leek in some trees, the chaces of anyone touching the ground where you pissed in in the next few days is so incredibly small.

And if you get 5 miles out, need to go, go home, that's your exercise for the day and you're not allowed to go out again, so of course people are going to keep going till they can find a secluded spot for a slash.

As for spitting, if a fly flies in my mouth, I'm going to spit it out. Sorry, that's just how it its. My advice would be you should really stop licking the road and the verge while there's a virus going around, at the best of times that's pretty gross!

What part of stay close to home do you not understand? 60 mile ride may be your ordinary ride, but this isn't ordinary times.get with the programme before we all get banned from riding at all

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zero_trooper replied to keirik | 3 years ago
0 likes

Well said bro' 

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imajez replied to Brightspark | 3 years ago
2 likes
Brightspark wrote:

Why is a cyclist so far from home that he has to stop for a piss?

Because urinating is nothing to do with distance from home. 
It's because you bladder is full. Some people have smaller bladders. Some folk need to make sure to stay well hydrated to prevent kidney stones. It could be a chilly day, so less sweating and more weeing. If you go out for a long [timewise] ride and do not not need a wee then you are probably not hydrating enough. Someone may not have needed a wee when leaving house and bladder only filled up when out and so on....

Quote:

If he has a urinal problem then he should have planned for his comfort stop knowing that cafes and public toilets are closed.

How? By not going out? Plus I imagine if you have such a problem scheduling a wee is probably trickier.
Plus having a wee in the great outdoors is not even a problem anyway. 
You seem to have a remarkable lack of empathy and imagination. 
 

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Brightspark replied to imajez | 3 years ago
3 likes

One thing that I didn't make clear in my earlier post. Was that when I said he was having whizz by the side of the road, I meant by the side of the road in full view of eceryone. It was the car horns that made me look out. Incidently on the opposite side of the road to where he was doing his business, are some woods with trees and bushes where perhaps I or maybe you might have choosen to go to be out sight. 

Not in full view wearing Hi-viz. Or perhaps he thought that being a cyclist wearing hi-viz and a helmet that no-one would see him. 

Did I witness a near piss of the day?

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Hirsute replied to Brightspark | 3 years ago
0 likes

I did think at first that is what you meant but it seems so outlandish, I changed my mind.

Like the last sentence

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zero_trooper replied to imajez | 3 years ago
0 likes

The issue was that the cyclist was taking a wazz in a very public manner.

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lllnorrislll | 3 years ago
8 likes

I cycle commute to work at a city hospital and have done so for the past 8 years and as pointed out by Chris Boardman, a lot of key workers are using bikes to be able to get to work.
I have also noted that there has been a massive increase numbers of bikes in the shed at work, as bus companies reduce their services.
At 6am commuting hasn't been too much of a problem over the last week, except a slight increased number of joggers and dog walkers out early.
However, using a shared path to come in for a late / twighlight and it has been like a August bank holiday. People picnicking, social drinking on benches, dogs loose all over the place whilst there owners stand chatting and those who have suddenly decided to dig bikes out from the backs of sheds and wobble and weave all over the place.
So please don't just pick on the cyclists as sadly there are many members of the general public who just don't get what the danger is!

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bikeman01 | 3 years ago
0 likes

First let me say I am cycling resopnsibility and so is everyone I see around here.

But the authorities are on an agenda here. Instead of breaking up groups they start to close off areas of open space, thereby forcing people into the remaining space and this turns public support against outdoor pursuits. The end result is they get what they always wanted - pubic support to make everyone stay at home.

Its a cheaper alternative to buying test kits.

Somehow cycling is considered a dangerous drain on the NHS and must be stopped. They wouldn't dream of banning cars and motorcycles.

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Rich_cb replied to bikeman01 | 3 years ago
8 likes
bikeman01 wrote:

First let me say I am cycling resopnsibility and so is everyone I see around here.

But the authorities are on an agenda here. Instead of breaking up groups they start to close off areas of open space, thereby forcing people into the remaining space and this turns public support against outdoor pursuits. The end result is they get what they always wanted - pubic support to make everyone stay at home.

Its a cheaper alternative to buying test kits.

Somehow cycling is considered a dangerous drain on the NHS and must be stopped. They wouldn't dream of banning cars and motorcycles.

Do you have any idea how much 'staying at home' is costing the government?

It is a lot more than the cost of testing kits.

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StuInNorway | 3 years ago
2 likes

At the same time they will also be banning the use of motorcycles as "some" bikers are heading off for a jolly jaunt to meet up at a carpark and socialise ? 

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Awavey replied to StuInNorway | 3 years ago
0 likes

yeah Id noted that there were alot of motorcycles on ride outs last weekend and this past week, even accounting for the weather, and they didnt look to be on essential travel only trips

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crazy-legs replied to Awavey | 3 years ago
4 likes

Certainly early on, there seemed to be a lot of car clubs and motorcyclists out ragging the shit out of it on the quiet(er) roads.

One of my solo rides, I saw three distinct car clubs - one a bunch of Subarus, one a load of 03/04 reg modified BMWs and the third a group of Mini Coopers - and there were a lot of motorcyclists suddenly able to use a lot more power with the roads bereft of the usual tourist traffic and parking.

This was just at the point that the majority of pubs and cafes had closed so no tourists out for a lunchtime pint and stroll but still plenty of people who'd obviously driven out there specifically for the social meet up, admire the cars and then hit the rev limiter.

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