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Where can I find wide cycling shoes? The best shoes for wide feet

The best wide cycling shoes for riders who need some extra room

Finding shoes that are comfortable enough to ride in all day long can be a nightmare for people with wide feet, so we’ve decided to round up the best wide cycling shoes that are currently available.

A couple of years ago, darrenleroy began a road.cc forum thread about wide cycling shoes because he was struggling to find any that didn’t make his feet ‘fall asleep’ while riding. Judging by the responses he got, getting comfortable shoes is a common problem for people with wider feet, and it’s no joke.

One option is to go to a bike fit specialist like Cyclefit where a technician will measure the length, width and arch length of your foot, your standing and seated arch height, and suggest the best shoes for you. They’ll give you the option of having your own custom footbed created.

If you don’t think that’s right for you and you just want to find some wide cycling shoes, here’s what’s available. There’s no substitute for trying shoes on before you buy them, of course, because what’s right for one person isn’t necessarily the best solution for someone else.

If you have wide feet and you’ve found something that works for you, please let us know in the comments section down below.

Bont

Now distributed by Raleigh, Bont shoes are interesting in that they’re built around a cycle-specific last that’s arguably closer to the shape of a foot than most others out there, hence their distinctive looks. We’ve always found Bonts to be fairly roomy in the toe box and we know of people who’ve needed a wide fit in some brands taking a standard fit Bont.

Bont Vaypour Plus - toe.jpg

With Bonts the sole extends upwards around the side of your foot, creating a little tub. It’s common for brands to mould the sole upwards at the heel section, but less common towards the front of the foot. The idea is that this “ensures neutral positioning of the forefoot and alleviates common issues associated with over pronation and supination [such as knee injuries and hip and lower back pain].”

There’s only so much space between the sides of the shoe for your feet to fit into, but Bont soles are heat mouldable so you can give yourself a bit of extra room in tight areas, within reason.

Bont Vaypour Plus - sole toe.jpg

Bont makes its shoes in stock, narrow and wide fits. There’s a simple way to find out the best size for you which involves tracing around your foot on a piece of paper and measuring the dimensions. You input your figures on Bont’s website and you’re given the right size.

If your feet are off the scale you can have Bont make you a pair of custom shoes.

Bont Vaypor S - side.jpg

Check out our recent review of the Bont Vaypor G here.

www.bontcycling.com

Bontrager

Bontrager doesn’t bring wide fit shoes into the UK anymore.

www.trekbikes.com

Giro

giro empire hv road shoe black

Giro offers several of its shoes in a ‘high volume’ (or HV) fit for foot widths from D-EE, if that means anything to you (personally, the last time I had my foot width measured was for a pair of Clarks Commandos in 1978).

giro empire hv road shoe black

UK importer Zyro Fisher only lists the the Empire HV road shoes (above, £274.99) and Cylinder HV+ mountain bike shoes (£114.99).

Check out our review of standard fit Giro Imperial shoes here.

www.giro.com

Lake

We’ve generally found Lake shoes to be roomy in the toe box, the front end being rounded rather than pointy (technical terms!), and fairly high volume.

If that’s not enough for you, Lake offers its entire road range in wide options, although it’s easier to get hold of some models than others in the UK.

lake cx403 cfc carbon road shoes white black

UK distributor Moore Large stocks wide versions of the high-end CX 403 CFC (£410, above) and CX 402 (£399) (we've reviewed the standard model), the CX332 (£330), CX241 CFC (£280), CX238 (£250), CX218 (£190), CX241 (£280) and CX176 road shoes (£130) and the CX145 (£195) winter road boots. If you want something more walkable, there are wide versions of the MX332 (£330), MX238 (£250), MX218 (£190), MX176 (£130), and MX145 (£195) mountain bike shoes, and the MXZ304 winter boot (£260).

Lake dealers can order wide models from Moore Large at the start of the season for delivery with initial stock. The distributor can also get wide models from the Lake warehouse in Holland very quickly in season as and when required.

www.lakecycling.com

Northwave

Italy’s Northwave offers two models of shoe in a wide fit, one each for road and off-road. The Core Plus Wide (£109.99) shoes have a vented, carbon-reinforced sole and can be used with two-bolt or three-bolt cleats.

Northwave Core Plus

On the walkable side, there's the £109.99 Origin Plus, with Northwave's Speedlight 3D sole.

Northwave Origin Plus

northwave.com

Shimano

Both of Shimano’s Road Competition level shoes, the S-Phyre RC9 (below, £319.99) and the RC7 (£179.99), shoes can accommodate wider feet pretty well, and if the standard fit isn’t broad enough you can go for a wide fit in both.

Shimano S-Phyre RC9 - 4.jpg

The RP3 (£99.99) is available in a wide fit option too.

www.shimano-lifestylegear.com

Sidi

You might have heard that Sidi shoes are small for any given size and that you should size up. We’ve not found that to be true in terms of length, but we have found the standard Sidi last to be narrow.

2020 Sidi Ergo 5 White Black

Standard Sidi shoes are based on a D width foot. Sidi offers what it calls a ‘Mega’ fit too, which is an EE to EEE width. It’s 4mm wider across the ball of the foot than a standard Sidi fit, the instep is higher and the heel cup is wider. The Ergo 5 (above, £260) and Genius 7 (£175) road shoes are both offered in Mega versions.

Check out our guide to the Sidi shoe range here.

www.sidi.com

Specialized

Specialized only carries its standard width shoes in the UK. It’s worth noting, though, that the toe box volume is pretty generous.

Your experience

If you have broader feet, could you help out by offering advice on which wide cycling shoes have worked (and not worked) for you? Let us know in the comments section.

Mat has been in cycling media since 1996, on titles including BikeRadar, Total Bike, Total Mountain Bike, What Mountain Bike and Mountain Biking UK, and he has been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. Mat has been road.cc technical editor for over a decade, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer. Now over 50, he's riding road and gravel bikes most days for fun and fitness rather than training for competitions.

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58 comments

Avatar
Zivadaddy2 | 5 years ago
0 likes

I own the following shoes in my quest for the right width.

sidi mega exo

lake cx237x

lake cx176x

lake cx402 wide

lake mxz200

lake mxz330 wide

shimano M087 wide

my opinon:  if you think sidi mega exo are wide you truely do not have wide feet.  They are no where even close to being as wide as the lake cx237x

 

Had I read understood the lake size / last charts I would only own CX237x shoes.  As it is I threw away the 176 wide (much too narrow) I refuse to evr again wear my 402s (much too narrow)

I sold the mxz330 wide (much too narrow)

the mxz200 is ok in a size up (use the chart and buy the size based on the mm measurement of the forefoot.  I think I might even be two "number" sizes up but they fit my feet nearly as good as the cx237x.

 

The shimano M087w wide shoe is ok...maybe 2 millimeters less than the lake but I can wear them without any discomfort.  Perfectly acceptable for my gravel riding.

 

I will puchase a lifetime supply of the CX237x as funds and sales allow becasue it is the perfect fit for me.  Unless some other brand can guarantee me that their last size matches the last size of the lake competition last in the wide measurement it is not a "wide" shoe.

 

 

 

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timboid | 5 years ago
0 likes

I find the 45nrth (www.45nrth.com) shoes most accommodating, although they are not cheap. I use the Wolvhammer during sub-6-degree-C rides and they are lovely and warm, with good width. The insulation is so good, you don't really need thicky socks.

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pz1800 | 5 years ago
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I have finally found 2 pairs that fit my tiny but very wide feet after my long-gone Adidas Eddy Merckx which were the last shoes that did not make me miserable before a long string which did. A pair of Specialized at least 2 sizes too long but wide enough, and a pair of Dromarti leather shoes which  I don't dare wear if it looks like rain. I wil definitely look at Lake shoes, and thanks for this article. I also have a pair of Shimano which I know will only be comfortable for 90 minutes before I have to stop and rub my feet. 

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alan sherman | 5 years ago
0 likes

I spent a long time in Sigma Sport over the weekend trying on shoes.  Thank you to the sales guy's patience.

I didn'g get a successful shoe, but learned a lot:

  • My feet are 275mm long which on the scale is a 9.5 to 10.  (44 in EU sizing)
  • They are 115mm wide.  That is an e or f width.  That is wide.
  • The measure thingy said the arch length was also for a size 10
  • And the real killer - my largest 3 toes form a straight line (very square).

No shoes I tried have a square toe box, so I always ended going up the sizes.  Wide lake competition last and wide shimano had the width, but my third toe would always rub.  As I got to bigger shoe sizes I found the arch was in the wrong place, so my foot would want to sit further forward, leaving a gap at the heel or horrible arch support.

 

I currently ride in Specialised in a size 45 but my feet are going numb and my toes rub.  I tried Lake wide competion and race last and Shimano SPhyres in wide.  I hope to try the extra wide Lakes.  There are no large Bonts in Sigma.  They could get the Sidis in, but unlikley to work for my feet.

 

Does anyone know a wide and square shaped cycling shoe?  Off-road shoes seem to be straighter and I've found many that fit.  Road shoes see to curve the toe box too much.  Bont shoes from pictures look to have a squareish front, but I need to find some in London to try on, and my measurements in their online tool say to contact for a custom service.  That needs a foot scan or cast!  Has anyone gone that route?

I was eyeing up the muddy fox ones in sports direct today, they look wide and straight.  I'll investigate FLR from a previous poster.  The Gaerne's look to curved.  Anyone get anywere with Mavic or Specilaised wide fit?

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alan sherman | 4 years ago
0 likes

I'm a step forward! I've found the specialized torch 1.0 have a very straight toe now, i.e. don't curve in and cut off the smaller toes. I've moved up to a 47 and there is enough toe width, and the arch isn't painful. There is some space at the front of the toes, but the shoes work! Rode 60 miles yesterday in comfort. They are also cheap which is a bonus. The torch 2.0 was uncomfortable due to sole arch under big toe, and upper curve cutting off the small toes. Same with the s works.

Worth a go for square toe feet.

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jacquot | 4 years ago
1 like

If you men think you have trouble finding wide shoes, try being female and in Canada.  All those wide or HV sizes are only available in men's--which is fine, except that they don't make them in 38 (usually).  Then there's the utter lack of selection in Canada and the fact that, when men's styles are manufactured smaller than size 40, they aren't available in Canada.

And no, ordering shoes from outside the country is NOT an option unless I know for certain that they will fit--which means I've tried them on in person.

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weiwentg | 4 years ago
0 likes

I tried a pair of Giro HV+ VR90 MTB shoes. They aren't wide at all. I normally use a standard width Specialized. On the Giro, the width was OK at the ball of the foot, but they were squeezing my toes a bit.

Avatar
Notbuilt2climb | 4 years ago
1 like

Great stuff!  Is there an article somewhere that would help us find BIG sizes.  I'm somewhere in the region of 49-51 depending on the brand and on most websites, those sizes are rarer than hens teeth.  I've had Shimano in the past and am currently using Lake CX217s which I've had for 2 years but it's hard to find replacements at a reasonable cost.  Lengthy searches on the internet often prove fruitless.

Cheers

Avatar
Bigfoz | 4 years ago
1 like

Luck shoes also do different widths, and a fantastic amount of customization in top end ranges, including own design, different size feet, stacked soles widths, all sorts. I have 2 pairs of Luck in normal width, both fit fine, one pair of Sidi Mega (Can't wear the normals), and a pair of Northwave winter shoes that work if I take the inner soles. My last pair of Lucks were ordered earlier this year, took a couple of weeks, I suspect the custom ones might take longer...

Avatar
martin_in_surrey | 4 years ago
0 likes

I have spent the last month trying to find shoes for my wide feet.  Even in central London it was impossible to find a shop that actually stocked a decent range of options to be able to try them on and find the best fit.  Online stores tend to have only a very very small selection available - I ended up ordering 9 different pairs and returning 8 of them before settling on the Shimano RC701 wide fit.

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caveboy76 | 4 years ago
0 likes

It's amazing how many people have genuine problems with wide fitting shoes and just put up with it.

 

anyways, I spanked out on some luck custom XC shoes recently as they kinda worked out a similar cost to other shoes. They are a revelation on fit and has revealed how much I've put up with poorly fitting shoes in the past. However, the length of them is a bit too tight. So if you go for it make sure you double check length and ask as many questions as possible to make sure. The quality is great!

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hawkinspeter | 3 years ago
0 likes

I'm currently liking the pair of Bont Riot MTB shoes though I went for a larger size than normal. Pop them in the oven to soften them and then fit them to your feet.

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HarrogateSpa | 3 years ago
0 likes

This is a helpful article but I wonder if it's confusing shoes for wide feet with shoes that are "roomy in the toe box." Wide feet are wide where the 'knuckle' joints are.

I've used a Stanley knife to cut holes in my cycling shoes, to create more space that way. I admit that buying wide shoes would be a more elegant solution.

Avatar
ibr17xvii replied to alan sherman | 4 years ago
0 likes

alan sherman wrote:

I spent a long time in Sigma Sport over the weekend trying on shoes.  Thank you to the sales guy's patience.

I didn'g get a successful shoe, but learned a lot:

  • My feet are 275mm long which on the scale is a 9.5 to 10.  (44 in EU sizing)
  • They are 115mm wide.  That is an e or f width.  That is wide.
  • The measure thingy said the arch length was also for a size 10
  • And the real killer - my largest 3 toes form a straight line (very square).

No shoes I tried have a square toe box, so I always ended going up the sizes.  Wide lake competition last and wide shimano had the width, but my third toe would always rub.  As I got to bigger shoe sizes I found the arch was in the wrong place, so my foot would want to sit further forward, leaving a gap at the heel or horrible arch support.

 

I currently ride in Specialised in a size 45 but my feet are going numb and my toes rub.  I tried Lake wide competion and race last and Shimano SPhyres in wide.  I hope to try the extra wide Lakes.  There are no large Bonts in Sigma.  They could get the Sidis in, but unlikley to work for my feet.

 

Does anyone know a wide and square shaped cycling shoe?  Off-road shoes seem to be straighter and I've found many that fit.  Road shoes see to curve the toe box too much.  Bont shoes from pictures look to have a squareish front, but I need to find some in London to try on, and my measurements in their online tool say to contact for a custom service.  That needs a foot scan or cast!  Has anyone gone that route?

I was eyeing up the muddy fox ones in sports direct today, they look wide and straight.  I'll investigate FLR from a previous poster.  The Gaerne's look to curved.  Anyone get anywere with Mavic or Specilaised wide fit?

This is my experience as well & one I've not yet been able to solve.

If I get my regular 43 shoe size (Northwave) I find them too tight & if I go up a size to a 44 (Bont) they are much better but probably on the big side so my feet slide about a bit & the arch support is in the wrong place. If I tighten them to try to keep my foot in place I have to do them up too tight which deadens the foot.

It can end up costing a fortune as I don't think you can fully tell what they're like until you're on the bike & if they're no good you can't return them.

Frustrating.

Avatar
Lsmith replied to jacquot | 3 years ago
0 likes

YES!! I have the EXACT same issue..... men have it easy because at least they make wife shoes in their size! I'm also in Canada and have size 38. There are truly no options. On Shimano's website it says they make their wife models as small as a 36, but no store carries them, and I can't seem to find them online. Did you ever discover a solution? I am struggling. 

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check12 replied to Lsmith | 3 years ago
0 likes

Your wife is going to be annoyed when she finds out you've been telling the internet she's wide 

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check12 replied to alan sherman | 3 years ago
0 likes
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Profitmargin | 5 years ago
0 likes

I've got massive & wide feet and have a pair of Shimano RP3 (wide)   size 50E which are comfier than my work shoes.  I take size 13 usually.

Have a pair of Bont Riots which are nice and stiff and would be amazing is it wasnt for the rim of plastic that creates the "tub".  If you have any even  slightly pronounced bones on your feet they are going to bash against it - like wearing a pair of clogs.  Becomes painful for me after a time especially if climing out of the saddle when your  feet move around.  Tried the heat molding but there's a limited amount of give. 

Avatar
Profitmargin | 5 years ago
0 likes

I've got massive & wide feet and have a pair of Shimano RP3 (wide)   size 50E which are comfier than my work shoes.  I take size 13 usually.

Have a pair of Bont Riots which are nice and stiff and would be amazing is it wasnt for the rim of plastic that creates the "tub".  If you have any even  slightly pronounced bones on your feet they are going to bash against it - like wearing a pair of clogs.  Becomes painful for me after a time especially if climing out of the saddle when your  feet move around.  Tried the heat molding but there's a limited amount of give. 

Avatar
kil0ran | 5 years ago
0 likes

The big challenge is that even in the same series and same manufacturer fit varies if you have wide feet.

For years I rode in Shimano MO88s in wide fit - no issues, finally fell apart.

Looked to upgrade to something more tour/road specific so got the MT7 in size 43. Tried sizes either side - nominally I'm an EU42 but often size up to get the width. Kept them for a while but they were never comfortable - just felt cramped.

Sold those one and dropped down to the MT5 - same sole so I assume the same last as the MT7, just with speedlaces rather than a Boa. Needed to size down to a 42 in standard width and they fit perfectly. I couldn't even get my foot in to a 43 in the MT7.

I also tried the XC-series shoes - couldn't get any of the XC7s around my size to fit.

So frustrating and time consuming particularly as you invevitably end up buying online and returning.

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schneil | 5 years ago
0 likes

I have wide feet, that are pretty square in the toes as well. I've been really happy with my funkier FLR-65 shoes. They accommodate my wide feet really well, even with custom insoles for my low arches. Highly recommended.

Avatar
schneil | 5 years ago
0 likes

I have wide feet, that are pretty square in the toes as well. I've been really happy with my funkier FLR-65 shoes. They accommodate my wide feet really well, even with custom insoles for my low arches. Highly recommended.

Avatar
schneil | 5 years ago
0 likes

I have wide feet, that are pretty square in the toes as well. I've been really happy with my funkier FLR-65 shoes. They accommodate my wide feet really well, even with custom insoles for my low arches. Highly recommended.

Avatar
alotronic | 5 years ago
0 likes

+1 for the Sidi Megafit option. Got some older Genius 5 Megas in 43.5 and they are very roomy indeed, the first time I have ever thought I should have got my actual size in a cycling shoe (43).  Around the £100 mark note above on pricing. Bonts I had some success with, and they are cracking for shorter rides (less than 6 hours) but I find them a little severe for longer rides - not fit so much as the ridigity around the footbed <- horses for courses!

 

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mirg | 6 years ago
0 likes

Shimano R088 SPD-SL (Wide) fit my wide size 12 plates of meat pretty well for road cycling.  

Shimano M089 SPD (Wide) fit well for Mountain bike/Cross

Avatar
djpalmer32 | 6 years ago
0 likes

This article is a shameful reflection of the cycling shoe market and choice of wide fit shoes available in the UK. Only one shoe is under £100. Most of the rest are over £200, so you're buggered if you're on a lower budget. I was looking for wide fit shoes earlier this year to replace my Shimano Wides (which weren't quite wide enough). Due to the lack of choice at my budget I had to spend more and ordered directly from Lake. This cost more due to shipping. I went for their cheapest wide model. The Lakes are good and worth it. Still the lack of choice and availability at the lower price bracket is pretty bad.

Avatar
schneil replied to djpalmer32 | 5 years ago
0 likes
djpalmer32 wrote:

This article is a shameful reflection of the cycling shoe market and choice of wide fit shoes available in the UK. Only one shoe is under £100. Most of the rest are over £200, so you're buggered if you're on a lower budget. I was looking for wide fit shoes earlier this year to replace my Shimano Wides (which weren't quite wide enough). Due to the lack of choice at my budget I had to spend more and ordered directly from Lake. This cost more due to shipping. I went for their cheapest wide model. The Lakes are good and worth it. Still the lack of choice and availability at the lower price bracket is pretty bad.

The flr 65s I wear are well under £100. Worth a look if you have wide feet? (From memory my feet used to be right at the end of the width scale in Clarks)Ican still wear my correct size - I don't have to size up.

Avatar
StevenNemeth | 6 years ago
2 likes

Hi All,

First up, little disclaimer, yes I work for Bont Cycling.

Thanks for comments part_robot, but most of our clients and technical reviewer's would most likely disagree with your information on Bont Cycling shoes width.

The curve in our bases doe not take away from the width of our shoes and the phycical flat section (which also has shaping to assist people with transverse arch support) is already some of the widest available from any company. The curved edges do however mimic the natural shape of a foot's edge. This is one small part of what we refer to as anatomical shaping, that is true to the shape of a human foot.

In-terms of your comment about "our shoes making your toes bunch on top of each other", if you re wearing the correct size and a genuine Bont Cycling shoe, this is highly unlikely unless your toes are all basically the same length from large toe to small. I am happy to share some nice X-rays which a well respected orthopedic surgeon supplied to BC on how a typical foot sits inside a BC shoe. The Dr in question had taken these to show clients the benefits of wearing proper anatomically shaped sports shoes as he specialises in dealing with athletes.

Should you wish to discuss it further, please do not hesitate to contact me. Just send an email to info [at] bontcycling.com and ask for your email to be forwarded to Steven. I am happy to assist you personally in getting you fitted with the correct size shoe.

Cheers.

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IanEdward | 6 years ago
0 likes

Just a wee heads up, dropped into Evans Edinburgh as they had some Specialized Elite shoes from last year in my size, reduced.

Got some good advice from the manager (Dagmara) who pointed out that the fact I used to wear 44s for MTB might not equate to 44s being a good fit on the road, as your feet are more static and yyour position more fixed etc.

I tried some 45s in a Specialized and they certainly felt better, although obviously I didn't get a chance to pedal in them.

However the point of the story is that Evans also stock Louis Garneau shoes which seem to size up a mite wider than Specialized, a 45 in an LG shoe certainly felt a tiny bit wider around the ball of the foot than a 45 Specialized.

Happily LG shoes seem to come in quite a wide range of prices, styles and colours also, although I eventually plumped for black-on-black as I've been caught out once too often by downpours just before my commute home, turning my pimpy white shoes rapidly brown...

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IanEdward | 6 years ago
0 likes

For those buying Lake direct online, what is the customs situation?

Do you get stung by the Royal Mail for £8.50 handling charge and then 20% VAT on $120? (and in my experience, they don't convert dollars to ££ before slapping on the percentage, so it would be 20% of $120...)

Am looking at the CX161 in wide fit as Giro don't offer the HV Apeckx in white, perhaps I should just get black shoes and be done with it...

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