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Helmet market to grow by over $300 million globally in the next four years

Government initiatives promoting cycling and the rise in road injuries are some of the factors fuelling demand for helmets, according to a new report

The global bike helmet market is expected to grow by $325 million between 2022 and 2027, with 30 per cent of the rise coming from Europe, and aided by factors such as pro-cycling government initiatives, increase in road cycling accidents, and increasing demand for customised helmets.

A new report by market research company Technavio predicts that the helmet market, on an average, will accelerate on a compound annual rate of 5.9 per cent each year at least for the next four years, resulting in a massive market size increase of $325 million.

The most notable driving factor of this growth, according to Technavio, is the rise in government initiatives promoting cycling, with the European Union having made integrating cycling into its multimodal transport policy a top priority, and even the US encouraging cycling to reduce traffic congestion in its cities.

Another interesting market driver is the increasing demand for customised cycling helmets, particularly by corporate users, associations, and clubs. While already growing in popularity in Europe and Americas, customised products are also becoming popular in places like China and India.

The company studied the market growth of three helmet categories: road, sports, and MTBs, and found that road helmets are likely to occupy almost half the market share, as more and more people use bikes for daily commutes. The report also said the high living standards of those cycling, especially in the UK, France and Italy, drew them to novel products and premium brands’ goods.

However, the report pointed out a concerning trend — that the demand could also be fuelled by the rise in road injuries in recent years.

> Sharp rise in cyclist deaths on country roads in France blamed on “increasingly aggressive” drivers

Recently, a number of helmet brands have tried to raise awareness among all cyclists to wear helmets. During the Brain Awareness Week in March, Endura launched “world's most graphic cycle helmets” featuring CAT scans of cyclists' brain injuries to encourage helmet wearing.

One of the helmets featured the scan of Ian Charlesworth, 62, who was struck by the driver of an HGV in 2019, while another featured John Moroney's, a cyclist injured in a collision with the driver of a 4x4 in Bristol.

Members of Team Jumbo Visma wore unique “brain design” helmets at this weekend’s action-packed monument Paris-Roubaix. The Dutch team, whose member Wout Van Aert finished third after suffering an unfortunate puncture at the cobbled classic’s later stages, collaborated with its Belgian helmet supplier Lazer for this initiative.

> Mathieu van der Poel wins fastest ever Paris-Roubaix after Wout van Aert puncture drama

Endura Project Heid

Endura Project Heid helmets, featuring CAT scans

Lazer "brain-design" helmet, to be used by Jumbo Visma at Paris Roubaix 2023

Lazer "brain-design" helmet, used by Jumbo Visma at Paris Roubaix 2023

Helmet safety is probably a passionately contentious issue for a lot of cyclists, with people being divided on whether helmets are really a necessity for safe cycling.

Although studies from University of New South Wales and Norway's Institute of Transport Economics show helmets can significantly reduce the odds of head injury, experts such as psychologist Dr Ian Walker believes not wearing one can reduce the probability of a collision, with Olympian and active-travel advocate Chris Boardman himself calling the helmet issue a “massive red herring”.

However, another reason for a higher demand for helmets could also be the enforcement of wearing helmets for cyclists. From this month, a new law came into force in Japan that made helmets compulsory for all cyclists, making it the fifth country along with Argentina, Australia, Cyprus and New Zealand to have national mandatory cycle helmet laws applying to all cyclists.

The report from Technavio perhaps comes as a surprise, as we’ve seen the boom in the cycling industry due to the COVID-19 pandemic slow down, with the growth of public interest in cycling resuming back to normal.

> "Drastic slowdown" in demand sees MIPS' net sales slump 46% in final quarter of 2022

Since the end of last year, a number of cycling retailers have suffered a reduction in demand, with Halfords, the UK’s biggest retailer of bicycles, reporting that the domestic cycling market had contracted by 20 per cent over the past year.

The Swedish company MIPS, which is behind the prominent helmet safety system, also suffered a “drastic slowdown” in demand as its net sales slumped by 46 per cent in the final quarter of 2022.

In February, the Bicycle Association observed the sales slowdown since the Covid bike boom in its annual report, with sales of bikes in the UK dropping to the lowest level in two decades.

The new Technavio report, which involved “detailed analyses of the competitive landscape of the market and information about 15 market vendors”, including Halfords, Kask and Mavic, amongst others, said that the rising prices of raw materials could be a challenge to the market growth.

Adwitiya joined road.cc in 2023 as a news writer after graduating with a masters in journalism from Cardiff University. His dissertation focused on active travel, which soon threw him into the deep end of covering everything related to the two-wheeled tool, and now cycling is as big a part of his life as guitars and football. He has previously covered local and national politics for Voice Wales, and also likes to writes about science, tech and the environment, if he can find the time. Living right next to the Taff trail in the Welsh capital, you can find him trying to tackle the brutal climbs in the valleys.

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31 comments

Avatar
ChrisB200SX | 10 months ago
2 likes

Imagine if all that money was spent on something useful instead.

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wycombewheeler replied to ChrisB200SX | 10 months ago
3 likes
ChrisB200SX wrote:

Imagine if all that money was spent on something useful instead.

pretty small benefit, less than the weekly Brexit divident for the NHS 

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wtjs | 10 months ago
7 likes

I have stayed out of this one, because I'm sick of the topic. I wear one all the time on the bike, and when I'm up on a ladder emptying the gutters or installing aerials or cutting bits off trees or rock climbing, and quite often when scrambling- but not when I'm going up and down stairs or in the shower. I'm not unduly concerned about whether others wear helmets, and generally support the Boardman position. I am wholly against the idea that a cyclist not wearing a helmet can be used by 'the defence' to allege 'contributory negligence'. It's not the law, as it is in Oz/ NZ, that cyclists must wear helmets, and neither should it be.

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eburtthebike replied to wtjs | 10 months ago
0 likes

oops.  Wrong post.

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Steve K replied to wtjs | 10 months ago
5 likes
wtjs wrote:

I have stayed out of this one, because I'm sick of the topic. I wear one all the time on the bike, and when I'm up on a ladder emptying the gutters or installing aerials or cutting bits off trees or rock climbing, and quite often when scrambling- but not when I'm going up and down stairs or in the shower. I'm not unduly concerned about whether others wear helmets, and generally support the Boardman position. I am wholly against the idea that a cyclist not wearing a helmet can be used by 'the defence' to allege 'contributory negligence'. It's not the law, as it is in Oz/ NZ, that cyclists must wear helmets, and neither should it be.

I think a post like this should be added to every helmet article, and then comments closed.  

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marmotte27 replied to Steve K | 10 months ago
0 likes
Steve K wrote:

I think a post like this should be added to every helmet article, and then comments closed.  

I don't agree

@wtjs says "I am wholly against the idea that a cyclist not wearing a helmet can be used by 'the defence' to allege 'contributory negligence'."

But it will invariably be used that way as long as there is this unceasing an largely unfounded social pressure to wear helmets. Cue the countless times this social pressure menaces to become a legal one.

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wtjs | 10 months ago
1 like

Burroughs, like the Beats in general, was a doped up deadbeat and nutter- but there's some sense in those quotes- if true!

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hawkinspeter replied to wtjs | 10 months ago
2 likes
wtjs wrote:

Burroughs, like the Beats in general, was a doped up deadbeat and nutter- but there's some sense in those quotes- if true!

Burroughs seemed to have a life of two halves. He stopped using heroin around the age of 45 (I think when he was in prison for accidentally shooting his wife) and began his writing. I'm a fan of his writing as he approaches society as an outsider and he should almost be the patron saint of cynics. Amusingly, when he wrote Naked Lunch, the U.S. postal service couldn't send the book to people due to obscenity laws.

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Rendel Harris replied to hawkinspeter | 10 months ago
0 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:

Burroughs seemed to have a life of two halves. He stopped using heroin around the age of 45 (I think when he was in prison for accidentally shooting his wife) and began his writing.

Pedantry alert, he actually carried on using heroin virtually up to his death aged 83, with plenty of cures and relapses. What I always found fascinating was his theory in Junkie that continually coming off and on heroin meant that the junk-addicted cells died off and new ones were generated. I'm sure it has no basis in any known medical fact but when he died he didn't look much more than 60!

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hawkinspeter replied to Rendel Harris | 10 months ago
2 likes
Rendel Harris wrote:

Pedantry alert, he actually carried on using heroin virtually up to his death aged 83, with plenty of cures and relapses. What I always found fascinating was his theory in Junkie that continually coming off and on heroin meant that the junk-addicted cells died off and new ones were generated. I'm sure it has no basis in any known medical fact but when he died he didn't look much more than 60!

Well, he did stop using it, but he also started using it again lots of times.

Quote:

Why does an addict get a new habit so much quicker than a junk virgin, even after the addict has been clean for years? I do not accept the theory that junk is lurking in the body all that time - the spine is where it supposedly holes up - and I disagree with all psychological answers. I think the use of junk causes permanent cellular alteration. Once a junky, always a junky. You can stop using junk, but you are never off after the first habit.

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chrisonabike replied to hawkinspeter | 10 months ago
1 like

Isn't that a Mark Twain quote?  "Giving up smoking is easy… I've done it hundreds of times".

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hawkinspeter replied to chrisonabike | 10 months ago
3 likes
chrisonatrike wrote:

Isn't that a Mark Twain quote?  "Giving up smoking is easy… I've done it hundreds of times".

Tom Waits described Burroughs as "Mark Twain with an edge"

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Rendel Harris replied to chrisonabike | 10 months ago
3 likes
chrisonatrike wrote:

Isn't that a Mark Twain quote?  "Giving up smoking is easy… I've done it hundreds of times".

Also from the same source, if I remember correctly, "I have strict rules about controlling my smoking, I never smoke when I'm asleep."

Just for the hell of it also possibly my favourite ever smoking-related quote, when Groucho Marx had a woman on his gameshow who had 14 children: when he questioned her about this she said, "Well, I love my husband," to which Groucho replied, "Well, I love my cigar but I take it out of my mouth once in a while."

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brooksby replied to Rendel Harris | 10 months ago
1 like
Rendel Harris wrote:

I'm sure it has no basis in any known medical fact but when he (Burroughs) died he didn't look much more than 60!

Yes, but he was one of those people who was probably born looking not much more than sixty, and just never ever changed...

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hawkinspeter replied to brooksby | 10 months ago
0 likes
brooksby wrote:
Rendel Harris wrote:

I'm sure it has no basis in any known medical fact but when he (Burroughs) died he didn't look much more than 60!

Yes, but he was one of those people who was probably born looking not much more than sixty, and just never ever changed...

I like Bono's quote about him after he died a month or so after appearing in the "Last Night on Earth" video: "I thought he might have had another few centuries left in him. He was a great advertisement for doing everything you shouldn’t do."

Here's an early pic of him

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Cycloid | 10 months ago
5 likes

Two great scandals within UK cycling.

a) Helmets, Not fit for purpose and overpriced

b) Cycling infrastructure, Not fit for purpose and a waste of public money

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chrisonabike replied to Cycloid | 10 months ago
4 likes

Your statements need qualification:

Cycloid wrote:

a) Helmets, Not fit for purpose and overpriced

a) Helmets, fit for rated purpose (to provide reasonable head protection in a static / low-speed fall; probably the most common type of crash), may provide some protection in other circumstances, oversold / imagined by many (not manufacturers though) to possess lifesaving powers far beyond that.  Or more likely - to be cited to reduce liability / culpability of dangerous drivers, woeful street design or motorist-favouring policy and law... may be considered overpriced

Cycloid wrote:

b) Cycling infrastructure, Not fit for purpose and a waste of public money

b) Cycling infrastructure, the majority of what the UK has installed and lots it's still building is Not fit for purpose and a waste of public money because it doesn't even meet the current "guidelines" (eg. LTN1/20 - which is itself littered with unsuitable "absolute minimums" given that's what we reach for first) but could be transformative for transport and the environment if we make a network of at least Copenhagen standard (and Ideally more like Dutch).  Just like it is in those countries and elsewhere that this has been done seriously.

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ShutTheFrontDawes replied to chrisonabike | 10 months ago
0 likes
chrisonatrike wrote:

oversold / imagined by many (not manufacturers though) to possess lifesaving powers far beyond that.

It seems impossible for some to believe that some people wear a helmet in the full understanding that said helmet will only provide some protection, in line with reality.

Just because I wear a helmet does not mean that I think it will be a force field, magically protecting me against articulated lorries.

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chrisonabike replied to ShutTheFrontDawes | 10 months ago
2 likes

You wear one regularly though (I assume) and clearly have thought about the subject.  However most people in the UK likely never or almost never wear a helmet, because they are quite unlikely to cycle at all and even less on busy roads.  So why should they think about this subject?  Received opinion suffices - and received opinion exaggerates the protection offered by cycle helmets.  (Or - being fair - it probably isn't really about that - it's just "what you must do").

As you've identified there is a counter-current / reaction to this dismissing the *personal* utility of helmets but - outside of places where cycling is a mainstream activity - it is a niche opinion.

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ShutTheFrontDawes replied to chrisonabike | 10 months ago
0 likes
chrisonatrike wrote:

You wear one regularly though (I assume) and clearly have thought about the subject.  However most people in the UK likely never or almost never wear a helmet, because they are quite unlikely to cycle at all and even less on busy roads.  So why should they think about this subject?  Received opinion suffices - and received opinion exaggerates the protection offered by cycle helmets.  (Or - being fair - it probably isn't really about that - it's just "what you must do").

As you've identified there is a counter-current / reaction to this dismissing the *personal* utility of helmets but - outside of places where cycling is a mainstream activity - it is a niche opinion.

In the UK is what you should do. Just to be totally clear. There is no legal requirement to wear a helmet so the word 'must' is misleading.

So who is it that you think believes that Henry's are far more effective than they actually are? Is it the general public? If so, the 'danger as a barrier to cycling' argument doesn't make sense, because one could simply wear a helmet (as required by highway code) to be incredibly safe.

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chrisonabike replied to ShutTheFrontDawes | 10 months ago
2 likes
ShutTheFrontDawes wrote:

In the UK is what you should do. Just to be totally clear. There is no legal requirement to wear a helmet so the word 'must' is misleading.

"Must" - not quoting from the Highway Code - that's "general opinion" (see below); I know it's "should".  I'm sure you know that most people also have very little idea of the inside of that tome - was it yourself who pointed out that you don't actually need to see it to get past your tests?

ShutTheFrontDawes wrote:

So who is it that you think believes that Henry's are far more effective than they actually are? Is it the general public?  If so, the 'danger as a barrier to cycling' argument doesn't make sense, because one could simply wear a helmet (as required by highway code) to be incredibly safe.

Several streams crossing here - but individually: from personal anecdata and stuff "in the meeja" there does indeed seem to be a belief in helmets by the general public.  As I noted before I think this is less to do with reasoned thought about safety and more about "this is the socially correct thing to do if you are going to cycle (because it's not a "normal" activity - and most people don't get about that way)".

The "cycling is dangerous" idea is I think more an expression of "cycling doesn't look or feel safe" - which is mostly coming from a different place - so unaffected by helmet considerations. After all cycling in the UK is statistically a very safe activity and this is sometimes even mentioned mainstream.  Yet that doesn't inspire folks to regularly get out on the bikes that many of them own.  (The other reasons are of course "but we already have a car" and "there is no convenient route to my destination which feels safe / nowhere convenient to safely park my bike").

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marmotte27 | 10 months ago
1 like

Did I say see you all *soon*?

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ubercurmudgeon | 10 months ago
9 likes

Helmet manufacturers must be salivating like hungry dogs over the potential of cracking the Dutch cycling market. A bit of scaremongering, some political donations, and for Lazer whatever they had to pay the Jumbo team to pair their yellow kits with those fugly clashing pink helmets, could net hundreds of millions of euros in future sales.

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eburtthebike | 10 months ago
13 likes

Classic marketing used to sell helmets.  Make people afraid of something, even if it isn't particularly dangerous, then sell them something that makes them feel safer even if they aren't, and make sure that they can't sue you when it doesn't work by including a disclaimer in the box.  Even better, marketing costs are minimal because helmet zealots and governments promote them for you and if you're really lucky, they'll pass a law to guarantee your gravy train forever!

Cheap to make, massive profit margins: what's not to like?  Probably as profitable as drugs but none of the risk.

Capitalism at its finest.

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Sriracha replied to eburtthebike | 10 months ago
6 likes

In this case the fear is justified, since the injuries are part of government policy, according to the article:

Quote:

Government initiatives promoting cycling and the rise in road injuries ...

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Car Delenda Est replied to eburtthebike | 10 months ago
4 likes

Use the brain injuries of someone hit by an HGV to sell your helmets while fully knowing they're only rated for falling off your bike at 12mph..

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Cycloid replied to eburtthebike | 10 months ago
1 like

You are a miserable Cynic - So am I!

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eburtthebike replied to Cycloid | 10 months ago
1 like
Cycloid wrote:

You are a miserable Cynic - So am I!

I prefer to call it "experienced".  But yes.

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mark1a | 10 months ago
6 likes

.

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chrisonabike replied to mark1a | 10 months ago
5 likes

Best keep a lid on it...

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