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Verdict: 
Decent beam and runtime but let down by the bar bracket vibrations and not really an option for your helmet
Weight: 
523g
Contact: 
www.todayscyclist.com

Without wishing the remainder of summer away, it won't be long before lights will be needed once again. Nothing high powered for a while yet but what is worth considering when the daylight hours are few and far between? If you're after something that lights up the night but doesn't cost a fortune then the Extreme Bright Duo 2000 from one23 is worth a look. Providing an output of 2000 lumens it does a decent job of giving you plenty of light to see even in the darkest conditions.

So for £159.99 what do you get? The twin headlight unit looks like an owl with its machined wings and ridges. This impression is reinforced with the on/off switch at the back which has an alien look about it especially as it glows green with the battery connected and charged or red if the juice is low.

You get four settings, high and low beam, a flashing mode and an off mode selection. This is straight forward but you have to cycle through all four settings if you want to go from high to low and back up again. The head unit is well machined in black and red but is prone to get a tad warm when used for long periods. It weighs in at 150g.

The beam given off by the Duo 2000 is a bright tunnel of light. The power is funneled through two hi-power white Cree LEDs. There is a huge beam of light so outside of this tunnel is more of a blur. The spread or lack of is great for straight line viewing but if you wanted to venture off-road this isn't probably the light you need. For commuting or road riding the One23 light has an ideal light beam for even dark unlit roads.

In terms of runtime, the stated time on max output is 3.5 hours and during the test the Extreme Bright did get pretty close with 3 hours 20 minutes being the best consistent time. Providing this power is a lithium 6600mAh rechargeable battery which is wrapped in a rubberised bag. This is attached to your frame or stem courtesy of a thick velcro strap. It does keep everything in place but at 347g it is a noticeable lump.

To join the two is a simple matter of pushing the male and female connectors together and this join is protected by a large plastic cover. There is no shaking this loose so no danger of the light disappearing if you do hit a bump. To attach the head unit is a tool free exercise. A thick plastic bracket is secured to your bars with a screw fixing. The quick release is easy to use but due to the hinge on the clip it is prone to bounce and vibrate on bumpier terrain. Annoyingly so.

There is a helmet attachment but this is a heavy light and battery to have on your bonce. In the box besides the helmet attachment there is a connector extension allowing the head unit and battery to be further apart though this elevates the chance of getting in snagged. It is nice to have options but this is a light for your bars unless you have the neck of a bull. You could use the extension cable to attach the battery on your person or depending on your height, the bike frame but beware tangled cables.

To complete the set you get a mains charger to power up your battery and from flat this takes between 4-4.5 hours.

Overall the Extreme Bright Duo 2000 offers a decent beam with a good run time. The bracket and hinge does let it down as there is too much bounce and it is too heavy to realistically use on your helmet. There is a lot to like including the price but there is nothing to make the Duo stand out from the crowd.

Verdict

A decent beam and runtime but let down by the bar bracket vibrations and not really an option for your helmet.

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road.cc test report

Make and model: One23 Extreme Bright Duo 2000 - Front Light

Size tested: Black, Front light

Tell us what the light is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

For any rider who is thinking of taking on dark, unlit routes then the beam on the Duo is a decent option offering a strong, penetrating light which is great in a straight line. It offers a good runtime which is great if you're riding further afield or enough to commute both ways without having to take a charger with you. The runtime is good at almost 3.5 hrs with this many lumens that is a good offering.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the light?

The 2000 lumens are provided courtesy of two Hi-Power white CREE LEDs which throw out a decent white light. The power is supplied by a lithium-ion 6600mAh rechargeable battery. There are four settings on the head unit, hi, low and flashing before the off but you have to cycle through them to get back to high if you are dropping power when you are in a better lit area, not ideal. To cycle through the power offerings is done so by pressing the alien looking button on the back of the head unit which is green when there is sufficient charge or red if it is on the wane.

To attach the Duo to your bars is a quick release bracket made of sturdy plastic but the hinged plate the light is screwed to does bounce on uneven roads and is irritating.

Rate the light for quality of construction:
 
9/10

From the machined head unit to the bracket and other accessories the Extreme Bright Duo 2000 is well made and does exactly what you would expect to and without fuss. It is made to withstand tough conditions and has done so. The let down is the vibrations felt through the bar bracket that cause the unit to bounce in its fitting.

Rate the light for design and ease of use. How simple was the light to use?
 
7/10

The light is straight forward to attach and use. The only downside is having to cycle through the different settings for the light beam, not a problem but one of them is the off option so you could be left in darkness even if briefly.

Rate the light for the design and usability of the clamping system/s
 
6/10

The bracket is solid and made from hard plastic, definitely up to the job and easy to fit without tools. The clip is screwed to the bottom of the light and keeps the head unit attached to the bracket firmly but is still easy to remove. The hinge in the clip does cause or suffer from vibration so when you hit bumps it makes the light judder but also makes a noise. Irritating on longer rides.

Rate the light for waterproofing. How did it stand up to the elements?
 
8/10

The unit hasn't suffered any problems with water but does get warm in use.

Rate the light for battery life. How long did it last? How long did it take to recharge?
 
8/10

During use I managed to get close to the manufacturers suggested runtime of 3.5 hrs, with the Duo regularly getting to 3 hrs 20. Once spent, it took between 4-4.5 hrs to recharge which is not bad given the return you get. It's an easy process with the mains the charger easy to connect to the battery.

Rate the light for performance:
 
8/10

The two Hi power white CREE LEDs provide a powerful beam over a decent distance. The beam is direct but doesn't provide a huge periphery covering. The white light is bright.

Rate the light for durability:
 
8/10

The light has performed well during the test period without suffering from loss of performance. Attaching the battery to the head unit is still secure without any slippage or looseness.

Rate the light for weight, if applicable:
 
6/10

The head unit and the battery pack weigh in at 150g and 347g having checked them on the scales. The head unit isn't overly heavy but the battery pack does carry quite a pack given its compactness.

Rate the light for comfort, if applicable:
 
8/10

You wouldn't want to be staring at the light on its top setting - it is quite intense.

Rate the light for value:
 
9/10

Value wise the Extreme Bright Duo 2000 offers a lot of lumens for a reasonable price but it is let down by the couple of flaws in the fitting and suffers from a slight weight penalty.

Tell us how the light performed overall when used for its designed purpose

The light does what you'd expect in terms of beam, it is easy to fit without using tools. The battery lasts over 3 hrs.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the light

The direct beam is powerful and direct, ideal for dark rides.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the light

The flex in the hinge causing vibrations and noise are irritating and off putting and coupled with the weight of the battery which preclude using this on your helmet really let it down.

Did you enjoy using the light? It does serve a purpose but the flaws aren't great on a long term basis.

Would you consider buying the light? If the bracket could be sorted.

Would you recommend the light to a friend? If the flaws were addressed.

Overall rating: 7/10

About the tester

Age: 45  Height: 178cm  Weight: 80kg

I usually ride: Currently riding a Pinnacle Evaporite Three  My best bike is: As above

I've been riding for: Under 5 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: road racing, commuting, sportives, mtb, Not yet but looking to dip my toe in the world of TT

 

7 comments

Avatar
BigDonn [47 posts] 5 years ago
0 likes

Do we know what Cree LEDs are there on this light?
I'd love to see a comparison between this and something such as this at £26.99 from Ebay.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/161362759435?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&var=...
I know that you get a better warranty buying from a recognised store, and I would have my doubts about the lumen output claimed. That said, this light is less than a quarter of the price and, in my opinion, a better design for the road with a visor to prevent you accidentally looking at the light when climbing out of the saddle.

Avatar
dafyddp [471 posts] 5 years ago
0 likes

I bought some cheap ebay ones and thought they were great, until I heard about (and then Googled) the problem with exploding battery packs.
http://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/psa-warning-lights-bought-off-eb...

I'm no H&S nut, but the risk of a house fire for the sake of saving sixty quid (or whatever), doesn't seem worth taking IMO

Avatar
jollygoodvelo [1898 posts] 5 years ago
0 likes

Fair to say that I'm vaguely concerned about some of the battery scare stories, but the two I've had for a couple of years don't even get warm when charging.

However after not being used for six months neither will now take a charge... so need to buy a new one. Would I rather pay £100+ for a 'branded' light, or £25 for an unbranded one and break even after 8 years...?

Avatar
vbvb [622 posts] 5 years ago
0 likes
Gizmo_ wrote:

£100+ for a 'branded' light

I'm not sure I'd call One23 a proper brand. Website just a blank page. Isn't it just a name screen printed on a bulk order of chinese lights?  39

At £160, I'd be shopping with one of the big names, I think.

Avatar
Peowpeowpeowlasers [647 posts] 5 years ago
0 likes

> For commuting or road riding the One23 light has an ideal light beam for even dark unlit roads.

When will you guys stop with this codswallop? The roads are a shared resource, if you're using a light that blinds everyone else, it isn't an ideal beam!

Buy a light with a beam cutoff, like the Philips Saferide-they're much, much better.

Avatar
dawguk [16 posts] 5 years ago
0 likes
Peowpeowpeowlasers wrote:

> For commuting or road riding the One23 light has an ideal light beam for even dark unlit roads.

When will you guys stop with this codswallop? The roads are a shared resource, if you're using a light that blinds everyone else, it isn't an ideal beam!

Buy a light with a beam cutoff, like the Philips Saferide-they're much, much better.

Calm down dear, it's a commercial.

Avatar
Jez Ash [254 posts] 5 years ago
0 likes

Godwin's Law / Philips Saferide. That is all.