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Verdict: 
Fast and great handling entry-level cyclo-cross race bike
Weight: 
8,650g
Contact: 

The new Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race, the German company's most affordable cyclo-cross race bike thanks to a new aluminium frame, has all the fantastic handling and performance of the carbon Inflite at a much more appealing price.

  • Pros: Great race-ready handling, looks cool, good equipment
  • Cons: Could be lighter, slightly ugly welds in places

Ride and handling

The performance of the new Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race is highly impressive. I was left in deep admiration after testing Canyon's first attempt at a proper race-focused cyclo-cross bike last year, and thankfully none of that performance has been lost or even diluted with this aluminium-framed version.

> Buy this online here

In fact, without riding both bikes side by side, I'm minded to say that this bike feels just as fast and capable. It's a little heavier on the scales, but in the scrap of a cyclo-cross race, the courses of which are largely flat, the weight isn't really an issue. It doesn't feel heavy when you're accelerating down the back straight or when hefting it over your shoulder to jump over hurdles.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - riding 2.jpg

There's a little less 'snap' when getting on the pedals to accelerate back up to speed when exiting a crawling-pace hairpin, but the aluminium frame and carbon fork (the same as used on the more expensive Inflite) provide the necessary stiffness to ensure it's generally a very responsive and direct bike.

Canyon has wisely replicated the same geometry as the carbon Inflite. Compared to a regular road bike, the Inflite has geometry that is slacker with a 72.5-degree head angle and a longer wheelbase (1,018mm on this medium), both changes intended to produce a calmer and more relaxed ride at high speed and when tackling loose, unpredictable surfaces.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race.jpg

To further increase the stability factor, Canyon has increased the reach in tandem with speccing shorter stems, the latter serving to keep the steering nimble.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - stem.jpg

To test the Inflite properly I had to take it to a cyclo-cross race, so I entered a local evening floodlit series (shout out to the Supermarine CX), the ideal way to put it through its paces. And while my result won't set the world on fire, the bike was more than capable. It was easy to get it through the many, many tight hairpins, it was smooth along the two fast grass tracks, and accurate through the tight tree-lined singletrack sections.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - riding 3.jpg

Away from the lung-busting, blood-tasting demands of racing, it's capable on my regular bridleway bashing off-road route that I use to test adventure bikes. You can't take the same liberties with the narrow tyres as you can with the fatter tyres of gravel bikes, and higher pressures are needed to ward off flats, but it's more than adept at dealing with whatever trails the English countryside can throw at it. It's a little over-geared for this sort of riding, specced as it is for racing, but there are two sets of bottle cage bosses for longer rides.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - bosses.jpg
Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - bosses 2.jpg

Frame details

Canyon might be best known for attractively priced carbon frames but it knows the value of a decent aluminium frame, too, and this is a very tidy looking aluminium frame. Canyon has replicated both the geometry and the visual cues of the carbon Inflite, but the distinctive kinked top tube has been softened. I do wonder if Canyon could have just straightened the top tube completely, but then it would have lost this distinctive silhouette.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - top tube shape.jpg

The main tubes are oversized for stiffness, there's a tapered head tube with the full carbon fibre fork borrowed from the carbon Inflites, and the seatstays are dropped low down the seat tube. An external seat clamp replaces the internal clamp on the more expensive bikes but is no bad thing in my opinion – it's much easier to use.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - seat tube.jpg

As you might expect in this day and age, the Inflite AL SLX is only available with disc brakes and it uses 12mm thru-axles with flat mount callipers.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - front disc brake.jpg

All cables and hoses are internally routed, and while this bike has no front mech, there is provision for fitting one if you wish.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - cable routing.jpg

Tyre clearance maxes out at 35mm, as it's entirely designed for racing and the UCI's maximum tyre width limit is 33mm. There's reasonable clearance around the tyres and I had no issues with mud (what mud there is at the time of writing) clearing between the tyre and frame. As with the carbon Inflite, Canyon has ensured there are no areas where mud can collect on the frame, and has done away with the seatstay and chainstay bridges.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - seat stays.jpg

Clearly, the Inflite isn't intended as a versatile cyclo-cross/adventure bike. There are no mudguard or rack mounts. And it really won't take wider tyres – I tried. I fitted a set of 40mm tyres to test and the front cleared, the rear didn't, with the tyre rubbing against the chainstay. For that sort of extra versatility you're going to have to look at the company's Grail, though a set of 35mm tyres would open it up for more general bridleway exploring (can 2mm can make a difference? – discuss).

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - fork clearance.jpg

Equipment

Browse the catalogues of some companies' cyclo-cross bikes and you'll spot a lot of SRAM groupsets. The US company has enjoyed considerable success and popularity with its 1x hydraulic disc brake groupsets, and for good reason: it shifts well in all conditions, is reliable, provides a wide range of gear ratios and the brakes are powerful.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - rear disc brake.jpg

Fitted to this £1,299 bike is SRAM's most affordable 1x groupset, Apex, which borrows all the key tech from Rival and Force. That means a clutch-style rear mech and thick/thin chainring, which together do a good job of preventing derailment of the chain.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - rear mech.jpg

The shifting is easy – just one paddle on the right-hand side lever – and the disc brakes are powerful and quiet. The setup of 40-tooth chainring and 11-36 cassette was ideal for cyclo-cross racing.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - drivetrain.jpg

The DT Swiss C 1850 Spline DB wheelset combines 22mm internal width aluminium tubeless-ready rims with 370 aluminium hubs employing a three-pawl freehub for quick engagement. They're not the lightest at a claimed 1,745g, definitely an area for a future weight-saving upgrade, but put in a respectable performance and are more than up to the task of taking a battering.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - rim.jpg

Tyres are critical in cyclo-cross, but the decision to fit the Schwalbe X-One Bite Microskins is a smart one; these are £120 worth of tyres, too. Too often I see brands fit low-profile treads better suited to commuting than the reality of UK winter cyclo-cross racing.

As the tread pattern indicates, the X-One Bite is designed to excel in the mud, which it certainly does, with enough grip to keep you from getting bogged down. It's perhaps not the fastest rolling tyre on a bone-dry course but for anyone short of pro level or super-serious 'cross enthusiast, you're not going to lose out much at all. The only downer on the tyres is that I ripped the sidewall on a more adventurous outing (I got a bit carried away on a rocky descent), which serves as a reminder that there are limits to how hard you can push skinny cyclo-cross tyres.

You can read a full review of the tyres here.

Best of all, both tyres and wheels are tubeless-ready. You'll have to set them up tubeless yourself, but kits are easy to come by and making the conversion is pretty straightforward. I'll only ride tubeless when I race cyclo-cross and so far (touch wood) I've not had any issues or concerns.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - rim and tyre.jpg

Finishing kit is all solid no-nonsense stuff: an aluminium stem and handlebar with a VCLS carbon fibre seatpost with 25mm of setback, topped off with a Selle Italia X1 saddle.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - saddle and post.jpg

The carbon seatpost is designed to provide a bit of extra deflection to aid comfort on rough ground, and the gel handlebar tape provides a bit of extra cushioning as well.

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - bars.jpg

Rivals

The Canyon Inflite not only impresses on the race course, it's also really good value, which is pretty much as we've come to expect from Canyon. But how does it really stack up?

Very well when you compare it to the £1,700 Specialized Crux E5 Sport, which also pairs an aluminium frame with a SRAM Apex 1 disc brake groupset.

For the same price as the Canyon you can get a Giant TCX SLR 2, which also combines a SRAM Apex 1 groupset with an aluminium frame, though the crankset is downgraded to an FSA Omega item. I've ridden previous TCX bikes and they've offered a similarly good level of performance and handling to the Canyon.

For maximum value, the £1,000 Boardman CXR 8.9 looks hard to beat on paper, with an aluminium frame adorned with a SRAM Apex 1 groupset, but I haven't ridden that bike so can't comment on its performance.

> Buyer's Guide: 12 of the best cyclo-cross race bikes

The other option is to spend another £500 on the Inflite CF SL 7.0 Race. As well as the lighter carbon fibre frame, which produces a substantially lighter bike on the scales, you also get the slightly posher SRAM Rival 1 groupset with a power meter-ready crankset.

Is it worth the extra? I think it depends on your cyclo-cross ambitions. If you just want to race for fun and fitness, the Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race really won't hold you back much at all, but if you have an inkling you'll become seriously intoxicated with the sport, the Inflite CF SL 7.0 Race represents a good long-term investment with more upgrade potential.

Conclusion

The Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race is a fantastic, fast and highly competent entry into the exciting world of cyclo-cross racing, with race-proven handling and a really good equipment package that will help you to unleash your best performance on the race course. And did I mention how great the Hot Mint paint job looks?

Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race - riding 4.jpg

Verdict

Fast and great handling entry-level cyclo-cross race bike

If you're thinking of buying this product using a cashback deal why not use the road.cc Top Cashback page and get some top cashback while helping to support your favourite independent cycling website

road.cc test report

Make and model: Canyon Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race

Size tested: Medium

About the bike

List the components used to build up the bike.

FRAME CANYON INFLITE AL SLX

FORK CANYON ONE ONE FOUR INFLITE CF DISC

HEADSET CANYON | ACROS

REAR DERAILLEUR SRAM APEX 1, 11S

DERAILLEUR HANGER DERAILLEUR HANGER FOR ROAD DISCBRAKE MODELS/INFLITE CF SLX

BRAKE/SHIFT LEVERS SRAM APEX 1, 11S

BRAKES SRAM APEX 1

CASSETTE SRAM PG-1130, 11S

WHEELSET DT SWISS C 1850 SPLINE DB

TYRES SCHWALBE X-ONE, 33 MM

TYRE WIDTH: 33 MM

TUBELESS EASY MICROSKIN

ONE OF THE QUICKEST CROSS TYRES ON THE MARKET

TRIPLE COMPOUND

EVO LINE

Downloads (PDF)

Link to the manufacturer's website

CRANKS SRAM APEX 1, 11S

CHAINRINGS 40

CHAIN SRAM PC-1110

BOTTOM BRACKET SRAM GXP PRESSFIT

STEM CANYON V13

HANDLEBAR CANYON H17 ERGO AL

HANDLEBAR TAPE CANYON ERGOSPEED GEL

GEL HANDLEBAR TAPE

IMPROVES COMFORT AND STABILITY

SADDLE SELLE ITALIA X1

SEAT POST CANYON S23 VCLS CF (25 MM SETBACK)

DIAMETER: 27.2 MM

IN-HOUSE DEVELOPED CANYON SEATPOST WITH VCLS TECHNOLOGY FOR EXTRA COMFORT AND STABILITY

SETBACK: 25 MM

COMPLIANT WITH CANYON CATEGORY 2 TESTING STANDARDS

Downloads (PDF)

manual as pdf

SADDLE CLAMP CANYON CLAMP

PEDALS NONE INCLUDED

FRAME SIZES 3XS, 2XS (27,5), XS, S, M, L, XL, XXL (28")

COLOUR RACE BLACK | HOT MINT

WEIGHT 8,7 KG (SIZE M )

 

INCLUDED IN DELIVERY

Tell us what the bike is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about the bike?

Canyon says, "Our entry into the world of cyclocross brings the standout features of the multiple award-winning and race-proven Inflite CF SLX to aluminium level. The Inflite has been ridden from win to win by cyclocross superstar, Matthieu van der Poel. Now, the Inflite AL SLX brings you professional performance at an entry-level price thanks to the same race geometry. A high quality aluminium frame, Sram Apex one-by drivetrain, flatmount disc brakes, full carbon fork and through axles – this is performance without compromise."

Where does this model sit in the range? Tell us briefly about the cheaper options and the more expensive options

It's the entry into Canyon's cyclo-cross race bike range, and the only aluminium model currently available.

Frame and fork

Overall rating for frame and fork
 
8/10

Tell us about the build quality and finish of the frame and fork?

Very nicely made aluminium frame and carbon fork. Some of the welds around the bottom bracket aren't the smoothest I've ever seen though.

Tell us about the materials used in the frame and fork?

Aluminium frame and carbon fibre fork.

Tell us about the geometry of the frame and fork?

First things first, the geo is the same as the more expensive carbon Inflite, and that's a good thing as I found it generally worked very well.

Compared to a regular road bike, the Inflite has geometry that is slacker with a 72.5-degree head angle and a longer wheelbase (1018mm on this medium), both changes intended to produce a calmer and more relaxed ride at high speed and when tackling loose, unpredictable surfaces. To further increase the stability factor, Canyon has increased the reach in tandem with speccing shorter stems, the latter serving to keep the steering nimble.

It's available in eight sizes from 3XS to 2XL, with the smallest two frame sizes built around 650b wheels. The geometry has also been tweaked on these two smallest sizes to maintain the desirable handling, with reduced trail, a steeper head angle and shorter wheelbase.

How was the bike in terms of height and reach? How did it compare to other bikes of the same stated size?

I found the fit just about perfect. The reach is a little longer and designed around a shorter stem to enhance the handling.

Riding the bike

Was the bike comfortable to ride? Tell us how you felt about the ride quality.

Impressively comfortable for an aluminium frame.

Did the bike feel stiff in the right places? Did any part of the bike feel too stiff or too flexible?

Noticeably stiff when you get the power on out of a slow corner.

How did the bike transfer power? Did it feel efficient?

Adequate power transfer for getting straight back up to speed.

Was there any toe-clip overlap with the front wheel? If so was it a problem?

None at all.

How would you describe the steering? Was it lively neutral or unresponsive? Nimble and calm.

Tell us some more about the handling. How did the bike feel overall? Did it do particular things well or badly?

The handling is the right balance of agility and stability for dealing with both tricky slow speed corners and fast descents.

Which components had the most effect (good or bad) on the bike's comfort? would you recommend any changes?

The saddle isn't my fave but I could live with it for an hour-long race, but I'd probably look to change it at some point.

Which components had the most effect (good or bad) on the bike's stiffness? would you recommend any changes?

No changes.

Which components had the most effect (good or bad) on the bike's efficiency? would you recommend any changes?

No changes.

Rate the bike for efficiency of power transfer:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for acceleration:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for sprinting:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for high speed stability:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for cruising speed stability:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for low speed stability:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for flat cornering:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for cornering on descents:
 
8/10
Rate the bike for climbing:
 
7/10

The drivetrain

Rate the drivetrain for performance:
 
7/10
Rate the drivetrain for durability:
 
7/10
Rate the drivetrain for weight:
 
6/10
Rate the drivetrain for value:
 
8/10

Wheels and tyres

Rate the wheels for performance:
 
7/10
Rate the wheels for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the wheels for weight:
 
6/10
Rate the wheels for comfort:
 
7/10
Rate the wheels for value:
 
7/10
Rate the tyres for performance:
 
9/10
Rate the tyres for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the tyres for weight:
 
8/10
Rate the tyres for comfort:
 
7/10
Rate the tyres for value:
 
7/10

Controls

Rate the controls for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the controls for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the controls for weight:
 
8/10
Rate the controls for comfort:
 
7/10

All good apart from the saddle.

Rate the controls for value:
 
8/10

Tell us some more about the controls. Any particularly good or bad components? How would the controls work for larger or smaller riders?

The finishing equipment is all good solid kit, with short reach drops and a short stem promoting agile handling.

Anything else you want to say about the componentry? Comment on any other components (good or bad)

All the component choices are sound and sensible.

Your summary

Did you enjoy riding the bike? Yes

Would you consider buying the bike? Yes

Would you recommend the bike to a friend? Yes

How does the price compare to that of similar bikes in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

Compared to other bikes on the market, the Inflite is really good value for money, and the performance is equal to bikes costing a lot more. Not only is it a good entry-level cyclo-cross race bike, it's a good choice for racers of any level, and the money you save can be put towards race entry fees and petrol.

Rate the bike overall for performance:
 
8/10
Rate the bike overall for value:
 
8/10

Use this box to explain your overall score

The Inflite AL SLX 6.0 Race is pretty close to flawless really. Some of the frame welds could be tidier, and the wheels could be a bit lighter, but it all comes together well to perform brilliantly in a cyclo-cross race.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 31  Height: 180cm  Weight: 67kg

I usually ride:   My best bike is:

I've been riding for: 10-20 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: road racing, time trialling, cyclo-cross, commuting, touring, mountain biking

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

19 comments

Avatar
vonhelmet [1326 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

Are Bianchi getting any royalties??

Avatar
StoopidUserName [519 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
vonhelmet wrote:

Are Bianchi getting any royalties??

Looks a totally different type of green to me (or whatever Celeste is meant to be)

Would've bought this in a second for my winter bike/ commuter if it had mudguard mounts! The old version had them  2

Avatar
nonamed [7 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

What would You think about using this bike as an all-round bike for both paved roads and offroad tracks?

Avatar
David Arthur @d... [904 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

nonamed wrote:

What would You think about using this bike as an all-round bike for both paved roads and offroad tracks?

 

No reason why not really. You could fit up to a 35mm tyre for a bit of extra cushioning and it'll handle mixed terrain riding well. The geometry, particularly the high bottom bracket, is focused on the demands of cyclocross racing and the main thing you notice on the road is how the high bottom bracket places you over the top of the bike a bit more rather than in it as you get with a road or adventure bike

Avatar
codebauer [10 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Can you post a pick of the rear disc  <-> frame clearance?

I have an older Inflite, the clearance is sooo small that I have scrated the frame loads when removing the wheel. Makes me sad, as otherwise it's a great bike.

--pauL

Avatar
nonamed [7 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

I would like to see some pics of bottom bracket area and its finish. Thanks!

Avatar
Tass Whitby [63 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

nonamed wrote:

I would like to see some pics of bottom bracket area and its finish. Thanks!

Pic 13 in the gallery shows the BB area up close - you should be able to scroll through.

Avatar
Joe Totale [87 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

It's such as shame that Canyon seem allergic to mudguard mounts as either this bike or the Endurace would make lovely winter bikes but for me, the capacity to mount proper mudguards is non-negotiable. 

Avatar
David Arthur @d... [904 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Joe Totale wrote:

It's such as shame that Canyon seem allergic to mudguard mounts as either this bike or the Endurace would make lovely winter bikes but for me, the capacity to mount proper mudguards is non-negotiable. 

I totally get where you're coming from, and this versatility of cyclocross bikes has long seem them being appealing for more than just cyclocross racing. But Canyon has developed the Grail to be the do-everything option with mudguard mounts, allowing it to give the Inflite much more race focus than the previous Inflite AL

Avatar
Joe Totale [87 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
David Arthur @davearthur wrote:
Joe Totale wrote:

It's such as shame that Canyon seem allergic to mudguard mounts as either this bike or the Endurace would make lovely winter bikes but for me, the capacity to mount proper mudguards is non-negotiable. 

I totally get where you're coming from, and this versatility of cyclocross bikes has long seem them being appealing for more than just cyclocross racing. But Canyon has developed the Grail to be the do-everything option with mudguard mounts, allowing it to give the Inflite much more race focus than the previous Inflite AL

I understand that but the trouble is that the cheapest Grail is £2000 which for me is way too expensive for a long commute/winter bike. The cheapest disc Endurace or this bike are both at the £1300 mark which to me is a far more acceptable amount for a winter steed. 

From a purely aesthetic point of view I'm not a fan of the double handlebar on the Grail. 

I'm also keen on the idea of a Cross bike that can perform a double role of cross racing and also winter club rides with a quick change of wheelset and whipping the mudguards on and off. 

Avatar
nonamed [7 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

My height = 179 cm . And inseam = 84.5 cm.

As always I am betweeen S and M according to Canyon geo chart.

What do You think after testing M size? Will it suit 179cm rider? What is Your saddle height (measured from center of bottom bracket to top of saddle)?
Thanks for advice

Avatar
nonamed [7 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
Joe Totale wrote:
David Arthur @davearthur wrote:
Joe Totale wrote:

It's such as shame that Canyon seem allergic to mudguard mounts as either this bike or the Endurace would make lovely winter bikes but for me, the capacity to mount proper mudguards is non-negotiable. 

I totally get where you're coming from, and this versatility of cyclocross bikes has long seem them being appealing for more than just cyclocross racing. But Canyon has developed the Grail to be the do-everything option with mudguard mounts, allowing it to give the Inflite much more race focus than the previous Inflite AL

I understand that but the trouble is that the cheapest Grail is £2000 which for me is way too expensive for a long commute/winter bike. The cheapest disc Endurace or this bike are both at the £1300 mark which to me is a far more acceptable amount for a winter steed. 

From a purely aesthetic point of view I'm not a fan of the double handlebar on the Grail. 

I'm also keen on the idea of a Cross bike that can perform a double role of cross racing and also winter club rides with a quick change of wheelset and whipping the mudguards on and off. 

Same reflection. That's why as an alternative I take into consideration Marin Gestalt 2 for 2019 with thru axles and all those mudguard mounts etc.

Avatar
David Arthur @d... [904 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

nonamed wrote:

My height = 179 cm . And inseam = 84.5 cm.

As always I am betweeen S and M according to Canyon geo chart.

What do You think after testing M size? Will it suit 179cm rider? What is Your saddle height (measured from center of bottom bracket to top of saddle)?
Thanks for advice

 

I'm about 180cm and have a 75.5cm saddle height and find medium Canyons fit me really well. Hope that helps

Avatar
njmoffat [68 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

I'm hoping that new 2019 Endurace models will have mudguard mounts as I need a new winter bike to get me fit again and an Aluminium 105 Endurace would be perfect. The 2018 ones seem to be virtually sold out so I am hoping it won't be long until the 2019 ones make their way onto my screen!

 

Joe Totale wrote:
David Arthur @davearthur wrote:
Joe Totale wrote:

It's such as shame that Canyon seem allergic to mudguard mounts as either this bike or the Endurace would make lovely winter bikes but for me, the capacity to mount proper mudguards is non-negotiable. 

I totally get where you're coming from, and this versatility of cyclocross bikes has long seem them being appealing for more than just cyclocross racing. But Canyon has developed the Grail to be the do-everything option with mudguard mounts, allowing it to give the Inflite much more race focus than the previous Inflite AL

I understand that but the trouble is that the cheapest Grail is £2000 which for me is way too expensive for a long commute/winter bike. The cheapest disc Endurace or this bike are both at the £1300 mark which to me is a far more acceptable amount for a winter steed. 

From a purely aesthetic point of view I'm not a fan of the double handlebar on the Grail. 

I'm also keen on the idea of a Cross bike that can perform a double role of cross racing and also winter club rides with a quick change of wheelset and whipping the mudguards on and off. 

Avatar
spartachris [1 post] 1 month ago
0 likes

Do you think the feeling of less snap is just from the heavier weight or do you think the bike isn't quite as stiff as the carbon version?

Avatar
nonamed [7 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
David Arthur @davearthur wrote:
nonamed wrote:

My height = 179 cm . And inseam = 84.5 cm.

As always I am betweeen S and M according to Canyon geo chart.

What do You think after testing M size? Will it suit 179cm rider? What is Your saddle height (measured from center of bottom bracket to top of saddle)?
Thanks for advice

 

I'm about 180cm and have a 75.5cm saddle height and find medium Canyons fit me really well. Hope that helps

Then my saddle height is 1cm lower than You - it is 74.5 cm . Wonder if it will look ok on M size frame. How many CMs You still have left to minimum seatpost insertion indicator?

Avatar
Karbon Kev [714 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Looks good for the price, shame they put crappy old Sram on there ...

Avatar
niklas.trones@g... [1 post] 1 month ago
0 likes

I have this bike, a great bike by the way. I would recommend these mud guards, I have them myself on this bike: SKS Raceblade Pro XL. Easy on/off, lightweight and highly customizable. Fits wheels up to 33mm (as mine).  Works perfectly, and doesn’t look too shabby either if you ask me. 

https://www.sks-germany.com/en/products/raceblade-pro-xl/

Joe Totale wrote:
David Arthur @davearthur wrote:
Joe Totale wrote:

It's such as shame that Canyon seem allergic to mudguard mounts as either this bike or the Endurace would make lovely winter bikes but for me, the capacity to mount proper mudguards is non-negotiable. 

I totally get where you're coming from, and this versatility of cyclocross bikes has long seem them being appealing for more than just cyclocross racing. But Canyon has developed the Grail to be the do-everything option with mudguard mounts, allowing it to give the Inflite much more race focus than the previous Inflite AL

I understand that but the trouble is that the cheapest Grail is £2000 which for me is way too expensive for a long commute/winter bike. The cheapest disc Endurace or this bike are both at the £1300 mark which to me is a far more acceptable amount for a winter steed. 

From a purely aesthetic point of view I'm not a fan of the double handlebar on the Grail. 

I'm also keen on the idea of a Cross bike that can perform a double role of cross racing and also winter club rides with a quick change of wheelset and whipping the mudguards on and off. 

Avatar
nonamed [7 posts] 17 hours ago
0 likes

Will Inflite accomodate Panaracers GravelKings SK or MUD 700x35 ? (according to reviews these tyre measure ~38mm in real on 23mm inner width rim).

Any experience?