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Verdict: 
Each layer is great and the system ends up being excellent value
Weight: 
106g

The Dissent 133 Ultimate Glove Pack really is just that, and will easily see you through an autumn, winter and spring of road and commuter riding. I never found conditions where these couldn't be used, making them excellent value compared with the three sets of gloves I'd otherwise buy.

  • Pros: Each layer does its job very well, excellent dexterity
  • Cons: The closure system could be simpler

If you've not heard of Dissent 133 then don't worry. Neither had I before I got these gloves. It's a pretty specialist brand, focusing only on winter gloves. It's not such a simple thing to get right though. Whereas summer is easy to dress for with mitts or bare hands being fine, the block of time from October through to mid-March presents a big range of conditions.

> Buy these online here

Personally, I rarely suffer from cold hands – my issues usually come from having a cold core – but my hands can get clammy under gloves that don't breathe well. The result is that I have multiple pairs of gloves, from DeFeet's Duragloves through to heavy wet weather gloves. If only someone would put together a set that would see me through autumn, winter and spring... Oh wait, Dissent 133 has.

Dissent 133 Ultimate Cycling Glove Pack.jpg

The first thing that I'll say about this set is that it is, on the whole, brilliant. I've not yet encountered conditions where the system has come unstuck. There are small details that I'd change and updates that Dissent 133 has already made, but I can easily recommend these.

Breaking the pack down, you get a silk liner glove, knitted thermal layer, a windproof shell layer and finally a waterproof shell layer. All these layers can be worn individually, and Dissent 133 provides a guide of what to wear in specific conditions.

Silk liner

The liner glove is much like any liner. It's thin, very soft and adds good warmth when combined with either of the shell layers. The liner is very breathable, making it great for when the temperature is mild but you still want to use the waterproof shell for the rain. Fit is generally good, though my set was a little short on the wrist. That's already been fixed and packs are shipping with longer cuffed versions of the liner and thermal layers.

Dissent 133 Ultimate Cycling Glove Pack - layer 1 palm.jpg

Thermal layer

Speaking of those thermal layers, Dissent 133 was originally just using DeFeet's Duragloves. It's now designed its own version but the construction is largely the same, with great fit and excellent breathability. These are my go-to layer for dry conditions down to around 6°C. Anything below that and I reached for the windproof layer.

Dissent 133 Ultimate Cycling Glove Pack - layer 2 back.jpg

Still on the thermal layer, Dissent 133 has increased the amount of silicone grip on the palm and increased the cuff length. Both of these are good moves as it means more grip and better compatibility with jacket sleeves.

Dissent 133 Ultimate Cycling Glove Pack - layer 2 palm.jpg

Windproof shell

The windproof outer is a shell that is comfortable to wear on its own, or with either the liner or thermal layer. It is very flexible and packable so you can easily pop these in your pocket for extra cover on a chilly descent. The shell is totally windproof and when combined with a liner, it's a really warm system that I found still breathes very well. When using this with the thermal layer, I found that whipping them off for any longer climbs was sensible as extended hard efforts will cause a bit of dampness. Thankfully, they're very easy to remove and stow on the move.

Dissent 133 Ultimate Cycling Glove Pack - layer 3 back.jpg

A little bit of water resistance has also been incorporated into this shell and they handled light rain and wheel spray easily. Dexterity is one of the key assets to this layer. These offer the best feel of the bars of any windproof glove that I've worn. Shifting and braking are easy, although I know the lack of padding in the palm will put some people off. The palm surface is covered with silicone grippers and they provided good grip on my Lizard Skins bar tape.

Dissent 133 Ultimate Cycling Glove Pack - layer 3 palm.jpg

Waterproof shell

Finally, the waterproof layer offers brilliant protection against the rain. It's the least breathable of the set and so I was careful to use this layer sparingly. They do fit into a back pocket easily, though, so can be taken as an emergency layer should it start to chuck it down.

Dissent 133 Ultimate Cycling Glove Pack - layer 4 back.jpg

When I did get to use these gloves, they proved to be excellent, shutting out the rain that fell on my longer weekend rides. As the cold and wet conditions produce the rides where you're likely to be most miserable, the fact that this layer does its job very well makes it the most valuable, in my opinion.

Dissent 133 Ultimate Cycling Glove Pack - layer 4 palm.jpg

It's not all positive though. While the gloves as a whole are brilliant, I do have one gripe. For me, the closure system isn't the best; I'd much prefer a larger area of Velcro because the thin strip that you've got here isn't the easiest to hit.

The Velcro is also very abrasive and catches on everything. Not only does it catch on the liner and thermal layers, but it's also great at ripping into baselayers and other stuff in the wash. Yes, I could remember to close the tab... but a different Velcro, like the stuff used on GripGrab's waterproof gloves, would eliminate the issue.

Moving the closure system to the inside of the wrist would be my only other suggestion. When on the tops of the bars, there's a lot of material to get bunched up on the back of the hand. I never found it uncomfortable, but less material at that point would be better.

> Buyer's Guide: 21 of the best winter cycling gloves

Dissent does have reasoning for this closure system, though. It says it makes the shells easier to pull on and off while riding and they are indeed very easy to pop on in a hurry. But that said, I've rarely had an issue with other gloves so I'm not convinced the need is there. That said, other road.cc and off-road.cc team members who have also been riding with these gloves did like that aspect of the closure system. They do all agree with my niggle about the way the Velcro often/usually snags on the inner glove, though.

One other issue is the lack of reflective detailing. I'd really like to see some on the back of the hand so that when using these for commuting and evening rides, my turn signals would be more visible.

Fit and comfort

The fit is comfortable and unrestrictive. There is plenty of space to get the thermal layer under each of the shell layers. On the rare occasions that I used the shells without a layer underneath, they were slightly large but not uncomfortable at all. The fingers are a good length and there's no excess material on the palm.

While the cold has never been a particular problem for me, it is something a couple of the others who've been riding with these gloves do suffer from. The good news is, so far, they've found them more than capable of keeping the cold from nipping their fingers – even super-sensitive road.cc editor Tony. He actually went up to three layers – silk liner, thermal inner + showerproof outer – during January's cold snap and reported that they came through with flying colours and remained pleasingly dextrous. Oddly, he reckoned it was easier to get all three gloves on in one go (after taking all three off in one go) than trying to put two layers on in one go (after taking two layers off at the same time). I'd say it's pretty much always quicker to layer them up in sequence rather than trying to put the whole lot on at once.

Dissent 133 Ultimate Cycling Glove Pack - layer 3.jpg

Construction is good throughout, and over the extended test period (around 1,500 miles) I've used and washed these regularly. I'm happy to say that the waterproofing, in particular, has lasted. Likewise, the stitching is still solid. A little annoyingly, some of the silicone grippers, especially on the index fingers, have started to peel off. It's not the biggest issue but it'll really help to keep these away from the tumble dryer.

In terms of value, it's a hard one to judge; £95 might seem a bit steep, but you're essentially getting three pairs of gloves with a liner pair. They're very nice gloves too, and when you consider that a similar set from Rapha would set you back well over £200, this pack starts to look like fabulous value.

Overall, I reckon this is a brilliant set of gloves and well worth the money, especially if you suffer from cold hands. There are small things that I'd change for these to get full marks, but they're fully deserving of the 9/10.

Verdict

Each layer is great and the system ends up being excellent value

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road.cc test report

Make and model: Dissent 133 Ultimate Cycling Glove Pack

Size tested: Medium

Tell us what the product is for

From Dissent 133: "The Dissent 133 Layered Glove System was born from days on end spent riding in variable conditions, with numb fingers and wet hands, causing difficulty shifting gears or braking hard. When the weather is foul outside, the hardiest of cyclists reach for multiple layers to keep dry and warm. Dissent 133 applies this logic to a three-part Layered Glove System, designed to protect no matter the conditions outside. Utilising a unique layering system that mimics the way a rider would layer their upper body, to maximise adaptability throughout changeable conditions."

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Waterproof Layer: 82g

High Waterproof rating of over 10,000mm WPR (Water Permeability Rating), thanks to patented OutDry® technology

Excellent breathability; more than 20,000g/m2/day WVP (Water Vapour Permeability)

High and permanent elasticity, owing to high tensile strength

Lightweight but durable, thanks to Schoeller fabric, ideal for easy packing in your jersey pockets

Windproof Layer: 44g

Surface material is a highly flexible knitted interlock fabric

Under this is a windproof and water-resistant barrier membrane

Incredible dexterity for shifting/braking/control

Extremely Lightweight and easily packable into your jersey pocket

High breath-ability rating of 5,000g/m2/day WVP (Water Vapour Permeability)

Thermal Layer: 58g

Knitted construction means it is an ideal thermal layer that holds warmth incredibly when protected but a wind/waterproof outer layer.

Touch screen friendly middle finger, index finger and thumb

Versatile all season gloves – the choice of many top professionals

Silicone palm and finger grips

Liner: 24g

Lightweight full-fingered glove

100% silk

High-wicking and hydrophilic

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
8/10

Very good. The stitching is solid and the gloves cope well with being rolled up and left in a back pocket.

Rate the product for performance:
 
10/10

The set, in its different combinations, has performed perfectly.

Rate the product for durability:
 
7/10

All the important stuff, the windproofing, waterproofing and stitching are holding up well. The silicone grippers on the shell's fingers has started to peel though.

Rate the product for fit:
 
8/10

The liners offer a close fit and the shells have enough space to get the liners in underneath.

Rate the product for sizing:
 
8/10

Very nice and true to size.

Rate the product for weight:
 
6/10

Fine for winter gloves. (The weight listed is the liner + waterproof outer.)

Rate the product for comfort:
 
8/10

Very good indeed. The lack of palm padding might be an issue for some.

Rate the product for value:
 
10/10

Okay, £95 looks pretty expensive at first, but if you consider that they're actually £23.75 per pair, they're cheaper than lots of very good options.

How easy is the product to care for? How did it respond to being washed?

Wash with everything else and don't tumble dry.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

They provide comfortable protection against a wide range of weather.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

The fact that they've kept me warm and comfortable through everything the winter has so far thrown at us.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

The closure system isn't the easiest to use. It's also quite abrasive so you can easily snag the inner – particularly the thermal inner on the Velcro. In fact it's easier to snag than not snag. Maybe a magnetic closure would be better.

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

We've not tested a set of gloves like this. Not that I can see anyway. These are as well made and perform just as well as any other gloves that I've tested. As a set, each component part at £23.75 is actually quite cheap.

Did you enjoy using the product? Loved them.

Would you consider buying the product? Yes

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes, especially one who suffers with cold hands.

Use this box to explain your overall score

Each layer in the system is very well made and works well on its own. Bring them all together and you've got a system that represents brilliant value over having several gloves for different conditions.

Overall rating: 9/10

About the tester

Age: 24  Height: 177cm  Weight: 62kg

I usually ride: Cannondale Supersix Di2  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: 5-10 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: road racing, time trialling, cyclo-cross, commuting, club rides, general fitness riding, I specialise in the Cafe Ride!

Son of a Marathon runner, Nephew of a National 24hr Champion, the racing genetics have completely passed him by. Liam spends his time plodding his way through cyclocross races, very busy not winning. As an advocate for perfectly clean chains, he can be found cleaning his bike instead of training. A shop mechanic, Liam has many helpful skills, such as being able to identify 'cross tubs by the tread pattern alone. If you bump into him, he'll probably be eating.

11 comments

Avatar
Prosper0 [190 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

I think these guys are really onto something. I’m amazed that the big brands don’t make their gloves work together or offer a set at a discount. We all need gloves for different periods of the year. 

 

Personally I don’t think the styling works for me. They look loose and flabby. No gel padding and few reflectives. 

Avatar
KiwiMike [1410 posts] 2 months ago
2 likes

I've been wearing these for a year. They're awesome.

Prior to these I had a literal drift of gloves, ranging from lightweight to full-on Sealskinz lobster mitts. Maybe a dozen pairs, that I chose from, often wrongly. Either too hot, too cold, too bulky etc.

The Dissent133 system just works. I have all four on the go, varying the mix for temperature, wind, speed/duration of ride, and raininess.

My circulation is awful. Proper white fingers-numb awful. The three layer setup here suited me for 3hr sub-zero blatting about snow-covered gravel roads in the mist and wind. Any worse and I'd not be out. The ability to pop a layer in a pocket before or during a ride is great, and the velcro closure works just fine. With the liner and wool underneath the velcro's at its minimum use for me, but this of course will vary depending on your wrist width, and whether you have any layers extending under the cuff. I have a baselayer with thumb loops, and usually tuck jackets under the cuff unless it's pissing down in which case they go over. 

Yes, they cost. You'll be glad you spent the £££ for years. And you can buy individual pairs should you wear one out or rip it. 

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Christopher TR1 [237 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

Oh good, I'm glad to have the chance to add my thoughts about these gloves.

I got them when they first came out and I feel I fell for the advertising hook, line and sinker. I was really convinced that they would be the gloves to end all glove problems. I was disappointed.

The good:

  • The liner gloves are good and I wear them under my Sealskinz lobster claws when it's colder than minus 3 degrees or so.
  • The wind resistant outers are good enough but bulkier and not much warmer than long fingered mitts.
  • The water proof outers are quite water proof (but...).

The bad:

  • Yes, that velcro and the closure system in general is a pain.
  • The woolen gloves are totaly useless. No grip, no warmth, no wind or water resistance. Yes, I can see that they should provide good insulation when worn under the outer gloves (because they would trap a layer of air) but, in practice they are too bulky and limit dexterity to the point that I would rather just wear my lobster claws.
  • As mentioned, the water proof outers do have good waterproofing, but not perfect. I have still managed to have wet hands after a prolonged ride in the rain. I suspect the water has entered at the wrist, due to the fairly short cuff and less-than-ideal closure system.
  • The fingers are much too long on the water proof outers. The sizing of the other gloves seems correct, but these ones are too long and, while this helps keep my fingers warm, it makes pressing buttons and producing a crack-shot snot-rocket nigh-on impossible.
  • As mentioned, when it gets really cold, I still have to use my lobster claws.
  • It's all very well having a mix and match system, but it is very inconvenient to have to have valuable pocket space stuffed with gloves and then have to stop to switch to another glove combo (personally I would struggle to do it without stopping).

So, my search for the perfect glove goes on. My Sealskins will not last another winter!

Avatar
joethearachnid [5 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

Got a pair of these for Christmas. This review pretty much perfectly sums up my niggles - the closure system is pretty rubbish at least when it comes to putting the gloves on, although the relase is very easy, the velcro snags on eeeeverything and the grippers on the fingertips are disappointingly already peeling off after only a few rides. Also agreed that more reflective detail would be nice.

They're good gloves and very comfortable but there's definitely some room for improvement.

Avatar
KiwiMike [1410 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
Christopher TR1 wrote:
  • Yes, that velcro and the closure system in general is a pain.
  • The woolen gloves are totaly useless. No grip, no warmth, no wind or water resistance. Yes, I can see that they should provide good insulation when worn under the outer gloves (because they would trap a layer of air) but, in practice they are too bulky and limit dexterity to the point that I would rather just wear my lobster claws.
  • As mentioned, the water proof outers do have good waterproofing, but not perfect. I have still managed to have wet hands after a prolonged ride in the rain. I suspect the water has entered at the wrist, due to the fairly short cuff and less-than-ideal closure system.
  • The fingers are much too long on the water proof outers. The sizing of the other gloves seems correct, but these ones are too long and, while this helps keep my fingers warm, it makes pressing buttons and producing a crack-shot snot-rocket nigh-on impossible.
  • As mentioned, when it gets really cold, I still have to use my lobster claws.
  • It's all very well having a mix and match system, but it is very inconvenient to have to have valuable pocket space stuffed with gloves and then have to stop to switch to another glove combo (personally I would struggle to do it without stopping).

So, my search for the perfect glove goes on. My Sealskins will not last another winter!

The velcro works perfectly for me - it's designed to be adjustable *while wearing the gloves*. 

The woollen gloves certainly do add insulation. They are the main warmth layer. My hands would be useless if they didn't work. And I can operate 11-speed shifters without a problem. Certainly they are way, way better then lobsters - basic physics says that, just look at the differenc ein thixkness!

If water got under the cuff, that's not the fabric's fault. You need a better, longer-armed jacket that comes down to the wrist. Long gloves look silly if-when you ride with a normal jersey.

The whole idea of mix and match is that you can - er - mix and match. Of course you have to stop to put on or take off, if there's more than one layer in use. I suppose some would see it as a challenge to do it on the fly. 

 

Avatar
Christopher TR1 [237 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

"The woollen gloves certainly do add insulation. They are the main warmth layer. My hands would be useless if they didn't work. And I can operate 11-speed shifters without a problem. Certainly they are way, way better then lobsters - basic physics says that, just look at the differenc ein thixkness!"

I agree that they add insulation - it's what I said in my comment. But it's not much use if you can't move your fingers anymore! They are certainly not way better better than lobster claws: Operating SRAM E-tap (best bike, freezing but dry conditions) or my single speeder (of course) is no problem. Yet, all layered-up, the Dissent gloves are so tight that just the act of having fingers clenched around the bar becomes uncomfortable very quickly.

"If water got under the cuff, that's not the fabric's fault. You need a better, longer-armed jacket that comes down to the wrist. Long gloves look silly if-when you ride with a normal jersey."

Ha ha, yes it would certainly look silly, especially in torrential rain in the depths of winter (of course I was wearing long sleeves)! According to the review the design has been modified for the inner layers but I think the outer layers could do with more length too, or perhaps just a better seal with the wrist would sort it out.

I'm not saying the gloves are terrible but, for the price, unconvincing. For this tester, at least.

 

Avatar
cougie [48 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
Christopher TR1 wrote:

 

The bad:

  • The woolen gloves are totaly useless. No grip, no warmth, no wind or water resistance. Yes, I can see that they should provide good insulation when worn under the outer gloves (because they would trap a layer of air) but, in practice they are too bulky and limit dexterity to the point that I would rather just wear my lobster claws.

 

My Defeet wool gloves are my go to for spring/autumn/early winter.  Great for down to 5 degreees or so - after that it's proper winter gloves.  You can get them for £12 or so. 

Avatar
KiwiMike [1410 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
Christopher TR1 wrote:

"The woollen gloves certainly do add insulation. They are the main warmth layer. My hands would be useless if they didn't work. And I can operate 11-speed shifters without a problem. Certainly they are way, way better then lobsters - basic physics says that, just look at the difference in thickness!"

I agree that they add insulation - it's what I said in my comment. But it's not much use if you can't move your fingers anymore! They are certainly not way better better than lobster claws: Operating SRAM E-tap (best bike, freezing but dry conditions) or my single speeder (of course) is no problem. Yet, all layered-up, the Dissent gloves are so tight that just the act of having fingers clenched around the bar becomes uncomfortable very quickly.

All I can surmise is that for your gloves, your fingers are a lot thicker than mine. I have zero issues with tightness or dexterity. I think the issue you're describing is part of the eternal issue of hands and feet being totally personal. Maybe you picked too small a size?

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SpikeBike [143 posts] 2 months ago
1 like

I have used these for almost a year I think (pretty much everyday use).

Liner gloves have developed holes in the palm area but still functional. I will probably buy another pair of just the liners as they are great and cant find anything that thin elsewhere. Glad they have increased the cuff length it was a little short. I found the little finger and ring finger are way too long. I know everyone has different size fingers but they are weirdly longer than needed. This is also true of the defeet thermal layer in these two fingers. The rest of the fit is great.

 

I use the thermal defeet layer on its own or with the liner quite a lot and it is great for the mornings when it is cold but on the commute home in the evening I can lose the liner. I wouldnt use them below 8degrees. They looked pretty shabby when they arrived but have held up very well. No holes etc. I do find the seam annoying at the end against my fingertip. They do become baggy after use and therefore dont give you the greatest of feel on the bars. The grib stays and your hand moves in the gloves is probably the best way I can say it.

 

The showerpass layer is totally useless really. Fingers are wet in 5mins through the three layers and it doesnt offer any real benifit over the outdry layer.

 

The outdry layer I have found to be fully waterproof (~hour in the rain) and does a good job against the wind however with the 3 gloves on I get frozen fingertips with temps below 3degrees after about 20mins (rest of the hand is fine). Its like the seam at the end is letting in wind but yet it is waterproof. I just dont understand why glove makes will not add an extra layer like a cap on the end of gloves. Yes you lose feel but so to do you when they have gone numb. Plus lose the touchscreen stuff. Its freezing, you are on a bike dont use your phone.

 

The box it comes in is nice to have but not needed and there are no bands to hold the gloves against the sides of the box. They are just in there in a heap. The hangers are also nice to have but I have never used them. I would say if they got rid of them and the box and just made the whole system cheaper people would be happier (people = me)

 

I see they now sell something called "HIPORALITE WATERPROOF GLOVES" which are meant to work down to -5. Totally needed but at £55 I am torn between spending that on them or just buying some deep winter lobsters instead.

 

Avatar
OllieTheWizard [7 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

Hi to the guys who have left feedback below the article. From all of us here at Dissent 133 | The Rider Firm, we wanted to thank you for taking the time to provide your feedback and honest criticisms of elements of the gloves that you didn't get on with. Without listening to how riders get on (or don't) with our gloves, then we simply can't improve them - which is something we are of course always seeking to do. 

 

Christopher TR1 - with some of your comments specifically pertaining to the thermal mid-layer, we have actually updated this glove since launching and so I suspect the current glove will be much more to your liking. Do you mind getting in touch with your order number so that we can get a pair sent out to you? It would be great to hear if you find them to be an improvement - we all like them a lot more here.

 

Many thanks once again,

Ollie (Dissent 133)

Avatar
hongziyang [1 post] 2 months ago
0 likes

I've been using mine most of the winter.  In general, I'm pretty happy.  I love them for Fall/Spring riding and the occasional mild winter weather streak we see here in Salt Lake City.  I've found they really aren't warm enough for me down below -2 or -3 C.  Anything above 0c and the system is great.  I love being able to actually feel my handlebars!  I might have to look into the Hiporalite layer.  

I also concur with the velcro closure.  If they had even just done the velcro the other way around so the smooth side was on the glove body and the hook side on the flap, that would eliminate most of my complaints.  As is, if you don't have them all the way tight/covered, it just snags on everything.  

As others have mentioned, the gripper material on my windproof layer lasted all of maybe a week before it starting peeling off.  It's all gone now.  Kind of a bummer.  

Other than that, I really like it.  Much easier to pack for commuting when we see pretty drastic temperature swings from moring to evening.  Nice to not have to pack 2 bulky pairs of gloves, but just stash these in a pocket.