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Verdict: 
Attractive price, but the braking, crosswind stability and lateral stiffness leave a lot to be desired
Weight: 
1,412g
Contact: 

Ican's Aero 50 Carbon wheelset is one of the cheapest budget carbon options. The wheels are light, for the depth, and feel fast, but that's outweighed by their twitchiness in any wind, inconsistent braking, huge lateral flex, and lack of tubeless equipment in the box.

Pros: UK warehouse so no extra taxes

Cons: Braking; stability in the wind; no tubeless valves or tape included; lots of lateral flex

 

Ican Aero 50 wheelset - rim bed.jpg

Ican is based in China, with most of its stock held there, but it has warehouses in the US, Belgium, Germany, Australia and right here in the UK too. As anyone who has ordered wheels from China will tell you, a UK warehouse is a very good thing. It can cut delivery times down and means that you won't be paying extra taxes. With Ican, shipping is also free.

> Buy these online here

In the box, you'll get your new wheels, skewers, carbon brake pads, and standard rim tape. As the wheels are advertised as being tubeless ready, I was a little disappointed not to find the tape and valves included.

Setting up clincher tyres was pretty straightforward, and once I'd got some tubeless tape the 25mm Vittoria Corsa Speed G tyres that I mounted went up with a standard track pump and some vigorous pumping.

On the road

Ican Aero 50 wheelset - rim 1.jpg

Looks are a big part of why I love deep-section wheels. They transform a bike's aesthetics and the deep whooshing sound never gets boring. These aren't the deepest wheels that I've had on my bike, but they fit the 'race look' perfectly with subtle decals.

I've given these wheels as much riding on varied terrain as possible because, even though it's a fast wheelset, most of us will ride on everything but smooth race circuits.

Braking is often the Achilles heel of cheaper carbon rims and I'm afraid to say that's true here, these are poor under braking. There are a couple of grabby spots in both rims which, even under the softest braking, were causing the rear wheel to lock up. Initially, I thought the issue might be my SwissStop pads, but switching them out for the pads provided made no improvement.

Handling is better, with the wheels able to track nicely through smooth corners, though the vertical stiffness rears its head on broken tarmac. Even with the tyres set up tubeless and running less than 70psi, I was feeling every imperfection.

Crosswind stability, despite the promising-looking profile of these rims, is also poor. The wheels are skittish in a breeze, with the front wheel partricularly so. As I mentioned before, I've ridden deeper wheels in the form of Knight's 65mm deep carbon clinchers. They were totally unfazed by the wind, so to have a wheel 15mm shallower be so nervous is very disappointing. I don't think that the lower weight of the Ican wheels is to blame here. I've had even lighter 50mm tubular wheels which were stable in windy conditions. 

What the Ican Aero 50s lack in stability and braking they slightly make up for in speed. On still days, they hold speed well. Getting them up to speed isn't the best though. They feel sluggish and slow when out of the saddle. I think this is may well be down to the lateral flexing the wheel is prone to creating a wheel that feels quite soft when you accelerate from slow speeds.

The R01 hubs are a standard straight-pull design that provides a base for the Sapim CX-Ray spokes; 18 are laced radially on the front wheel, with 24 on the rear – 12 laced two-cross on the non-drive side and 12 radially on the drive side.

Ican Aero 50 wheelset - rear hub.jpg

As already mentioned the vertical stiffness of these wheels is not matched by the lateral stiffness. I was able to get brake rub and, more worryingly, enough rub on my chainstays to cause significant cosmetic damage. The worst damage is to the non-drive side chainstay, suggesting that the radially laced Sapim CX-Ray spokes don't cope well with drivetrain forces in this lacing pattern.

I'm not even a big, powerful rider, so if you can put out over 1,100W (my max power) then you might be too powerful for these wheels. The wheel/tyre combination that I've used here isn't any wider than my usual setup and I've had no previous issues with wheels costing from £200 to over £2,000, from a range of manufacturers including Shimano, Fulcrum, Mavic, Pacenti and Vision.

Contacting Ican about the issues that I've experienced has - as yet - yielded no resolution.

Value

These are possibly the cheapest carbon wheels that we've tested, but that doesn't mean they're great value. Yes, the price is low, but because of the poor braking, lack of lateral stiffness and crosswind issues, I'd say they actually offer poor value for money.

At this price point, aluminium wheels are probably the way to go. There are so many good options from the likes of Shimano, DT Swiss, Mavic, and countless others. The Pacenti wheels that I currently have on test are brilliant, and Stu loved the £350 Forza Rim Brake wheelset.

If you must have carbon then I'd suggest you start saving up. CES Sport does the RC50 for £600, and the Prime RR-50s are £599.99. Hunt's 50 wheelset is pricier at £899, but you get a set of wheels that beats two-grand wheelsets for performance and value. (Stu tested the 3650 Carbon Wide Aero wheels and was very impressed.) Internally and externally they are wider than the Icans, and handle better in crosswinds. They also come with tubeless tape and valves.

Conclusion

The Icans are cheap, but it shows in the braking, lateral stiffness and any crosswind. If you go for a shallower, disc brake option then they might be okay, but I'd suggest you save up for the Hunt wheels, then you'll have exceptional performance to match the looks.

Verdict

Attractive price, but the braking, crosswind stability and lateral stiffness leave a lot to be desired

If you're thinking of buying this product using a cashback deal why not use the road.cc Top Cashback page and get some top cashback while helping to support your favourite independent cycling website

road.cc test report

Make and model: Ican Aero 50 wheelset 

Size tested: 700c

Tell us what the wheel is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Ican says: "The Aero 50 is a 50mm deep wheelset that is a member of the Aero Series. The Aero Series is a super-light successor of the Fast and Light Series. The Aero has all the impressive features found in the Fast and Light Series but in lighter forms.

"The Aero 50 features a 25mm wide rims with a tubeless-ready clincher rim profile. Tubeless tires offer better rolling resistance and protection from punctures. The broad design of the wheelset provides stability and safety to the rider at high speeds.

"The Aero 50 is molded from a combination of Toray T700 and T800 carbon fiber cloths. This marriage of carbon fiber results in a wheelset that is lighter than its equivalent in the Fast and Light Series. The change has produced a weight reduction of 61.1g on the front wheel and 60.5g on the rear wheel.

"The Aero 50 features a lighter R01 hubset with fewer spokes than its equivalent in the Fast and Light Series. The reduction was an effort by ICAN engineers to reduce the overall weight of the wheelset while maintaining strength. The Aero 50 can support a rider weight limit of 232lbs or 105Kg. The wheelset comes fitted with the super-light and aerodynamically sound CX-Ray spokes. The hub on the rear wheel is a 10/11 speed Shimano Cassette.

"The Aero 50 break track comes with improved heat resistance. This break track can tolerate up to 300o of heat- this is 60o higher than its equivalent in the Fast and Light Series.

"Each purchase of the Aero 50 comes with a set of skewers, carbon brake pads, and a rim tape."

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the wheel?

From Ican:

Type

- Carbon Racing Bike Wheelset

Rims

- Superlight AERO 50

Material

- 100% Carbon Fiber Toray T700 & T800

Size

- 700C

Rim

Finish: UD Matt

Drills: 18/24 Holes

Width:

- External: 25mm

- Internal: 18.35mm

Depth

- 50mm

Profile

- Clincher Tubeless Ready

Hub

- R01 Hubs

Spoke

- Sapim CX-Ray Spokes

Spoke Count

Front: 18 Rear: 24

Spoke Tension

Front:

- 110kgf

Rear:

- Drive side: 136kgf

- Non-drive side: 59kgf

Spoke Pattern

Front

- Radial

Rear

- Radial drive side

- 2-cross non drive side

Nipple

- Alloy

Color

- Black

Cassette Compatibility

- Shimano 10/11speeds

Wheelset Weight

- Total: 1357+-20g

- Front: 592+-10g Rear: 765+-10g

Brake Surface

- 3K Twill

Recommended Tyre Size

- 700 x 25-40mm

Rider Weight Limit

- 105kg

Guarantee

- 2 years

Free

- 1 set of skewer

- Carbon brakes pads

- Rim tape

Rate the wheel for quality of construction:
 
2/10

Why the rear wheel is laced with the radial spokes on the drive side I have no idea. This is a high-stress area and probably explains the lateral flex that I found. They've also used Sapim CX Ray spokes. This could also have played a part, especially when used in this lacing pattern with the low hub flanges. It's just a mess of a build.

Rate the wheel for performance:
 
3/10
Rate the wheel for durability:
 
5/10
Rate the wheel for weight
 
8/10

Actually pretty good for a deeper wheel.

Rate the wheel for value:
 
3/10

Did the wheels stay true? Any issues with spoke tension?

They're not perfectly true out of the box but they stayed straight enough through the test period.

How easy did you find it to fit tyres?

Both clinchers and tubeless tyres went up easily.

How did the wheel extras (eg skewers and rim tape) perform?

Basic rim tape, but not tubeless, so I had to buy that to test these properly.

The skewers were too long for my bike – not an issue I have often.

Tell us how the wheel performed overall when used for its designed purpose

On a still day, on an open road with a good surface and no corners, these are ok. The rest of the time, they're not that nice to ride.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the wheel

They're fast wheels, I'll give them that.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the wheel

The braking is poor, but at least that's only needed for junctions and corners. Crosswind stability issues are a constant problem.

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

Cheapest we've seen. Though you can still spend less buying directly from China, I don't recommend it.

Hunt 50 Carbon is £899 - Where I'd spend my money. A fabulous wheelset.

CES Sport RC50 is £600 - Stu was pretty impressed, especially with the braking surface.

Did you enjoy using the wheel? No

Would you consider buying the wheel? No

Would you recommend the wheel to a friend? No

Use this box to explain your overall score

The braking, crosswind stability and lateral stiffness can't be solved with a low price.

Overall rating: 3/10

About the tester

Age: 24  Height: 177cm  Weight: 62kg

I usually ride: Cannondale Supersix Di2  My best bike is:

I've been riding for: 5-10 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: road racing, time trialling, cyclo cross, commuting, club rides, general fitness riding, I specialise in the Cafe Ride!

Son of a Marathon runner, Nephew of a National 24hr Champion, the racing genetics have completely passed him by. Liam spends his time plodding his way through cyclocross races, very busy not winning. As an advocate for perfectly clean chains, he can be found cleaning his bike instead of training. A shop mechanic, Liam has many helpful skills, such as being able to identify 'cross tubs by the tread pattern alone. If you bump into him, he'll probably be eating.

44 comments

Avatar
cyclesteffer [421 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes

Ican? You can't.

Avatar
Prosper0 [239 posts] 1 month ago
3 likes

Ouch. 

Im not a wheel builder, but radial lacing on the rear drive side seems nuts to me. Surely you’d want 2x on the drive side and radial on the other if anything?

Avatar
check12 [306 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes
Prosper0 wrote:

Ouch. 

Im not a wheel builder, but radial lacing on the rear drive side seems nuts to me. Surely you’d want 2x on the drive side and radial on the other if anything?

 

radial on the drive side is very random! I had to go back to the pictures but yes that’s what these wheels have, random! 

Avatar
skeuomorph [12 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

Radial on the drive side - the theory is that:
1) thats the side that needs the most tension which radial helps with.
2) the hub is a big stiff lump of metal that transfers drive forces to the other side with no problem

Avatar
Mb747 [30 posts] 1 month ago
2 likes

Ive used the 40mm version of these in tough winds where i didnt want to use a zipp 808 front.

They it felt good and is around 300g lighter for the front wheel

Avatar
Tecnociclista [1 post] 1 month ago
0 likes

I have the 55mm version of their Fast & Light wheels which are a little heavier than the Aero series but still quite competitive, especially when considering the price point (mine are exactly 1600g, the latest model is listed at 1520g).

To me the rims looks very similar to the Aero ones (profile is identical, don't know about carbon layup) but they come with top-of-the-line Novatec hubs instead of the ICAN-branded ones and have two more front spokes.

I find them very stiff and have no issues whatsoever in crosswinds. I also owned a pair of Reynolds Strike 62mm wheels which cost multiple times the price of the ICANs. In the end I decided to sell the Reynolds, mainly because it was virtually impossible to mount and seat a tire when puncturing out on the road, but also because I could not really feel any difference in terms of speed or crosswind sensitivity compared to the ICANs. The ICAN wheels are even a few grams lighter and have a slightly wider rim bed which makes for a wider tire profile and better grip.

I'd buy those wheels again without even thinking about it. The Aero wheels you have tested are very light, even when compared to premium competitors. Maybe they overdid it with the lightweight design....they have quite slim looking hubs and two fewer spokes on the front, so maybe that makes all the difference but I am still surprised they received such a terrible rating.

Also, what brake pads did you use? I found the included ones terrible but some blue Lifeline pads from Wiggle improved things a lot, certainly not any worse than the Reynolds with the Reynolds blue pads.

Avatar
Liam Cahill [198 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

Tecnociclista wrote:

I have the 55mm version of their Fast & Light wheels which are a little heavier than the Aero series but still quite competitive, especially when considering the price point (mine are exactly 1600g, the latest model is listed at 1520g).

To me the rims looks very similar to the Aero ones (profile is identical, don't know about carbon layup) but they come with top-of-the-line Novatec hubs instead of the ICAN-branded ones and have two more front spokes.

I find them very stiff and have no issues whatsoever in crosswinds. I also owned a pair of Reynolds Strike 62mm wheels which cost multiple times the price of the ICANs. In the end I decided to sell the Reynolds, mainly because it was virtually impossible to mount and seat a tire when puncturing out on the road, but also because I could not really feel any difference in terms of speed or crosswind sensitivity compared to the ICANs. The ICAN wheels are even a few grams lighter and have a slightly wider rim bed which makes for a wider tire profile and better grip.

I'd buy those wheels again without even thinking about it. The Aero wheels you have tested are very light, even when compared to premium competitors. Maybe they overdid it with the lightweight design....they have quite slim looking hubs and two fewer spokes on the front, so maybe that makes all the difference but I am still surprised they received such a terrible rating.

Also, what brake pads did you use? I found the included ones terrible but some blue Lifeline pads from Wiggle improved things a lot, certainly not any worse than the Reynolds with the Reynolds blue pads.

Looks like the F&L range is using a much better hub design which is probably the reason that yours work well. I can't think why these feel so twitchy. Like I say in my review, I've ridden deeper wheels that have behaved perfectly in strong winds and lighter wheels of the same depth with no issues. Again, as I said in the review, I used my trusty SwissStop pads and the supplied pads. Neither solution worked. In practice, the wheels were basically unrideable, hence the score.

Avatar
McVittees [85 posts] 1 month ago
0 likes

I've had a pair of the Ican 40s for about 3 years.  These have Novatec hubs and are two cross / radial on the rear drive / non-drive sides.  Braking is just about ok in the dry and terrible in the wet.  Fine for racing but on trips to Dorset and Gloucestershire I swaped them out for aluminium rims.  Descending >10% gradients on these presents me with real confidence problems if I can't see a long run off to a hill (unless it's bone dry).

I can't say I've noticed any problem with their stability in cross winds but agree there is a lot of lateral flex in the rear wheel.  I have to run my brake pads with 3-5mm of clearance to stop rubbing (77kg rider , no big watts).

Otherwise, I'm happy seeing as they cost less than £400 (delivered) on ebay and are very light.  However would probably would buy some Primes next time.

Avatar
Prosper0 [239 posts] 1 month ago
1 like
Tecnociclista wrote:

Also, what brake pads did you use? I found the included ones terrible but some blue Lifeline pads from Wiggle improved things a lot, certainly not any worse than the Reynolds with the Reynolds blue pads.

That’s because the Wiggle blues are rebranded Reynolds blues. That’s why they’re so popular and well reviewed. Top money saving tip! 

Avatar
philhubbard [206 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes

Also, just to let everyone know, ICAN do a cheaper model (£275) now with the cheaper Powerway hubs (Popular Chinese option) with 2 cross NDS lacing and radial on the DS. These should help with the flex issues. 

Just to ask Liam (I'm sure you did) but did you check the tension on the wheels you received before riding them? Just wondering if they were loose at all or needed bedding in? 

 

Just so everyone knows, no affiliation with ICAN just like a set of Chinese wheels. I had some great success with the mountain bike styles but have only tried 1 road style

 

Avatar
Liam Cahill [198 posts] 4 weeks ago
1 like
philhubbard wrote:

Also, just to let everyone know, ICAN do a cheaper model (£275) now with the cheaper Powerway hubs (Popular Chinese option) with 2 cross NDS lacing and radial on the DS. These should help with the flex issues. 

Just to ask Liam (I'm sure you did) but did you check the tension on the wheels you received before riding them? Just wondering if they were loose at all or needed bedding in? 

 

Just so everyone knows, no affiliation with ICAN just like a set of Chinese wheels. I had some great success with the mountain bike styles but have only tried 1 road style

 

Unless I've misunderstood you, that's the same lacing pattern that I've got here.
The tension wasn't checked before use. We test products as they come to us as that's what we'd expect most customers would do. I'd expect even the cheapest wheels from the likes of Shimano/Fulcrum/Mavic etc to have been checked before they left the factory.

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Dom_1000 [6 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes

I have the 40 aero version, and have no lateral flex problems. I find them really fast. The pads that came with them were terrible, but yellow Swiss stop pads worked as well as alloy rims ( in the dry anyway). I would really recommend them over the ksyrium pros I did have. These are my first road tubeless wheels and I love them. Some tape and valves would have been nice.

Avatar
Rapha Nadal [1147 posts] 4 weeks ago
5 likes

Love all these first time posters coming out of the woodwork with their positive tales...

Avatar
philhubbard [206 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes
Liam Cahill wrote:
philhubbard wrote:

Also, just to let everyone know, ICAN do a cheaper model (£275) now with the cheaper Powerway hubs (Popular Chinese option) with 2 cross NDS lacing and radial on the DS. These should help with the flex issues. 

Just to ask Liam (I'm sure you did) but did you check the tension on the wheels you received before riding them? Just wondering if they were loose at all or needed bedding in? 

 

Just so everyone knows, no affiliation with ICAN just like a set of Chinese wheels. I had some great success with the mountain bike styles but have only tried 1 road style

 

Unless I've misunderstood you, that's the same lacing pattern that I've got here. The tension wasn't checked before use. We test products as they come to us as that's what we'd expect most customers would do. I'd expect even the cheapest wheels from the likes of Shimano/Fulcrum/Mavic etc to have been checked before they left the factory.

 

Hi Liam, apologies, meant to put J-Bend spokes as oppose to the straight pull you received. 

I understand why you test this way but from my experience in a bike shop most mechanics will have to true and check tension of wheels before they are sold for new wheels but maybe this is just a perk of buying from your local shop (not relevant for the ICAN wheels) 

Avatar
Liam Cahill [198 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes
philhubbard wrote:

Liam Cahill wrote:
philhubbard wrote:

Also, just to let everyone know, ICAN do a cheaper model (£275) now with the cheaper Powerway hubs (Popular Chinese option) with 2 cross NDS lacing and radial on the DS. These should help with the flex issues. 

Just to ask Liam (I'm sure you did) but did you check the tension on the wheels you received before riding them? Just wondering if they were loose at all or needed bedding in? 

 

Just so everyone knows, no affiliation with ICAN just like a set of Chinese wheels. I had some great success with the mountain bike styles but have only tried 1 road style

 

Unless I've misunderstood you, that's the same lacing pattern that I've got here. The tension wasn't checked before use. We test products as they come to us as that's what we'd expect most customers would do. I'd expect even the cheapest wheels from the likes of Shimano/Fulcrum/Mavic etc to have been checked before they left the factory.

 

Hi Liam, apologies, meant to put J-Bend spokes as oppose to the straight pull you received. 

I understand why you test this way but from my experience in a bike shop most mechanics will have to true and check tension of wheels before they are sold for new wheels but maybe this is just a perk of buying from your local shop (not relevant for the ICAN wheels) 

Ah yes, hopefully, the J-bend models feature a higher DS flange?
I think you're spot on, that's defo one of the biggest reasons to buy from a shop or a wheel builder that you trust.

Avatar
ktache [2129 posts] 4 weeks ago
7 likes
Rapha Nadal wrote:

Love all these first time posters coming out of the woodwork with their positive tales...

He, he, he..

RaceView Cycles in Co. Antrim, anyone?

Avatar
solar [4 posts] 4 weeks ago
1 like

I bought an Ican frame in 2012, and while it was very cheap, it presented a whole host of issues that they didn't want to know about post sales. The carbon steerer tube ended up with a massive buldge from the compression plug. The chaninstays both cracked, in the same location each side. BB's lasted about a week (guess thats par for the course on most bikes now!), headset bearings lasted about 2 weeks. Seatpost creaked constantly. Wouldn't touch anything Ican again.   

Avatar
Dom_1000 [6 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes
Rapha Nadal wrote:

Love all these first time posters coming out of the woodwork with their positive tales...

While I am a first time poster here I found the review, so different from my experience I felt the compulsion to reply. Having said that, There were lots of testimonials on the ican website, yet I was never asked for one. Which for me was as first in recent times.

Avatar
Dom_1000 [6 posts] 4 weeks ago
0 likes
Rapha Nadal wrote:

Love all these first time posters coming out of the woodwork with their positive tales...

While I am a first time poster here I found the review, so different from my experience I felt the compulsion to reply. Having said that, There were lots of testimonials on the ican website, yet I was never asked for one. Which for me was as first in recent times.

Avatar
Dom_1000 [6 posts] 4 weeks ago
3 likes

 

Well, ladies and gents, there we have seen the end of the Chinese bot algorithms!

Hopefully they can come up with a less weird version English as standard next time. 

[/quote]

 

Mods please delete duplicate posts, my mistake. 

I have been called erudite before, but have never been accused of been a chinese robot. Perhaps if I use smaller words, it will help your understanding, 

I can also post a picture of me holding a  Ican wheel and todays paper  1

though I think no amounts of facts will change your opinion, 

Avatar
hawkinspeter [4095 posts] 4 weeks ago
1 like
Dom_1000 wrote:

I can also post a picture of me holding a  Ican wheel and todays paper  1

though I think no amounts of facts will change your opinion, 

That'd convince me - let's see it!

Avatar
ktache [2129 posts] 4 weeks ago
1 like

More impressive would be a picture of your bike with the wheels on out in the real world.

Sorry to be a bit suspicious, our little community has seen a few too many single posters extolling the incredible benifits of products and services that others have given less than positive views on.

Avatar
Dom_1000 [6 posts] 4 weeks ago
4 likes

Here is my rose xlite team with ican aero 40 wheels. Running tubeless. Weight with pump, saddle bag and cages 7.2kg

Avatar
ktache [2129 posts] 4 weeks ago
1 like

Ta Dom.

Avatar
hawkinspeter [4095 posts] 4 weeks ago
6 likes
Dom_1000 wrote:

Here is my rose xlite team with ican aero 40 wheels. Running tubeless. Weight with pump, saddle bag and cages 7.2kg

Nice!

Have you tried making it more black?

Avatar
Dom_1000 [6 posts] 3 weeks ago
3 likes

I find black more slimming.

Nice!

Have you tried making it more black?

[/quote]

Avatar
Prosper0 [239 posts] 3 weeks ago
4 likes
Dom_1000 wrote:
Rapha Nadal wrote:

Love all these first time posters coming out of the woodwork with their positive tales...

While I am a first time poster here I found the review, so different from my experience I felt the compulsion to reply. Having said that, There were lots of testimonials on the ican website, yet I was never asked for one. Which for me was as first in recent times.

Well, ladies and gents, there we have seen the limit of the Chinese bot algorithms!

Hopefully they can come up with a less weird version of English as standard next time. 

Avatar
stevesbike [4 posts] 2 weeks ago
0 likes

This is a very odd - and amateurish - review. I'm in the process of reviewing these wheels, and found a number of factual erros in this review. For one, the weight is not 1412 grams - it is 1357. The set I'm testing came in 2 grams under the listed weight. Jim Langley, a professional wheelbuilder who has a series of extensive youtube videos reviewing the aero 40, also found his wheels came in at advertised weight. Why is that significant? For one, these wheels are potential game-changers, not only in terms of their pricepoint, but in blurring the line between climbing wheels and aero. They are lighter than shallow wheels like zipp 202, reynolds attack, enve 2.2 (in all but their most exotic in-house carbon hub). In my testing, you can feel this right away. The acceleration is excellent, climbing, especially on 3-6 percent grades at speed is fantastic. They are fast going uphill as well as on the flats.

A thorough test should include checkng spoke tension, roundness, etc. (see Jim Langley's youtube videoe). My wheels came in at spec, did not have spoke twist issues like Langley, and the result is a laterally stiff wheel. If I were reviewing a wheel that had the problems reported here, I would immediately check spoke tension because something doesn't seem right about the flex reported here.

The other factual error is rim width. These are not 25mm wide. They are 28. Who cares? The shape is the contemporary U shape that flares midsection and then decreases at the brake track. This both allows easier insertion of the wheel through brake calipers and also matches rim to 25mm tires for aerodynamics. I compared the geometry of the rim profile (its curvature) to numerous other similar depth wheels and found a very close match. The shape of rims today is mostly the same, and I suspect manufacturers like this 'borrow' profiles from the big names. I highly doubt the profile causes unusual instability. It is more likely the light weight, which makes the front end of bikes feel a bit twitchier. I don't know how much experience the reviewer has with light wheels, but it's likely he's confused the two. 

The reviewer also seems not to understand the principle of spoke configuration and wheel-building. Mavic has many raidal drive-side wheels in their range.

Finally, I think before essentially trashing wheels in a review like this, a reviewer should give a manufacturer the opportunity to respond and perhaps even supply another set to see if there was some one-off problem with the wheels. 

It does seem like the reviewer was looking for problems. It's a bit silly to complain about the lack of tubeless valves and rim tape at this pricepoint. 

Finally, the reviewer gives the impression that the manufacturer is selling cheap generic rims. That's not the case. ICAN has been producing carbon wheels for as long as the major players, these wheels are UCI certified, and have an industry standard warranty. Would I race them in the alps? Probably not, but for everyday wheels for most riders these are a good value and their weight makes them especially appealing for people deciding between weight and aero - you can have both with these.

 

 

Avatar
Exup [64 posts] 2 weeks ago
1 like

I have ICAN FL50s, which replaced Zondas and find them quite good.

Yes, they do catch the wind a bit more and braking is worse, but that was expected from 50mm carbon rims!

 

Avatar
mtbtomo [293 posts] 2 weeks ago
2 likes

This whole thread is verging on a bit strange. If the reviewer found the wheels to be 1412g then I don't know how another person can comment on that unless they have weighed the same set of wheels themselves. Could easily be 50g difference either way on manufacturing tolerance.

If the reviewer found them twitchy and affected by wind then maybe that was their perception on that particular day. I wouldn't buy a product based on one review, I'd add it in with all the other reviews and information I could find.

I've had an ican seatpost and a friend has an ican aero frame which he also does well on. I'd trust them as a brand but if I wasn't happy with a product when it arrived mail order, I'd contact the seller and/or sort the problem myself if I felt I had the expertise.

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