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review

Wolf Tooth B-RAD Pump Bag

8
£44.00

VERDICT:

8
10
Handy, unobtrusive storage for a pump and other bits, with the option to strap or bolt it on making it both adaptable and secure
Multiple mounting options
Slim profile
Secure storage
All-day useful size
Shape demands precise packing
Weight: 
139g

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The Wolf Tooth B-RAD Pump Bag is a handy size, carrying more than enough to keep stuff out of your pockets, and the fact that you can either strap or bolt it to your bike adds versatility.

The Pump Bag is part of Wolf Tooth's B-RAD storage and hardware system, a collection of straps, bags and metal fixings designed to be used together for carrying all your tools, spares and knick knacks on your bike.

> Find your nearest dealer here

The Pump Bag is long, thin and not very deep, a size and shape that has both its positives and negatives. Its elongated and slim profile means it's unobtrusive and hides well in the shadow of a bicycle tube – less likely to be knocked or brushed with a knee if you mount it on the top-tube and easily forgettable under a down tube. But the slender rectangular shape also means you have to be particular and careful with your packing; you can't just stuff stuff in there and do the zip up.

The clue in the Pump Bag name is that at about 12in long it's the perfect size for hiding a mini-pump in, and with a roomy-for-this-sort-of-bag 1.9-litre capacity, it's possible to squeeze in a tube or two (subject to size) and some tools as well alongside that. Or you could wodge a featherweight jacket in. And snacks, definitely snacks. Depending on the shape of what you want to squeeze in, a bit of kit Tetris is required, but it does pay to fill it right up as a partially packed Pump Bag will tend to rattle annoyingly.

The Pump Bag comes with mounting options, in that it can be strapped to your bike, bolted to any spare bottle bosses, or attached to a Wolf Tooth B-RAD Mounting Base as part of its modular storage system.

The strap option is the quickest and most adaptable way of attaching it to your bike. There are a pair of loops at each end of the spine of the bag, through which you thread the two wide silicone-backed Velcro straps, to attach the bag around a bike tube. There is also a full length and sectioned webbing strap that runs along the side of the bag which you can loop these straps through; this option orientates the zip to the side of the bike so is the better choice for top-tube mounting and access.

2021 Wolf Tooth B-RAD Pump Bag - with velcro straps.jpg

The silicone backing of the straps both adds grip and protects your paint job, although you'll want to put something over the metal grommets that are spaced along the spine.

The straps hold the bag to your frame securely, with no sway or wobble. Putting it on a tube whose orientation is more vertical than horizontal requires an amount of pulling tight on the straps as it will want to shuffle down, especially if you've packed it with heavier things and/or are riding over bumpier ground.

The spine of the bag is reinforced with a stiff insert which keeps the bag's shape, and there are four grommet holes in there that handily coincide with frame bosses on your bike or the Wolf Tooth B-Rad Mounting Base.

Fitting the Pump Bag to a bike's bosses with the supplied T25 Torx head bolts can be a little fiddly, but a large internal flap Velcros over the top of the grommets and bolts to protect the bag's contents from rubbing and help prevent damp ingress. Once tightened on, the Pump Bag is there to stay, and that's probably a good thing as it's not something you'd want to remove frequently or swap to another bike once it's bolted on.

2021 Wolf Tooth B-RAD Pump Bag - hidden mounts.jpg

Depending on where your bike has bottle bosses, the Pump Bag could be mounted on the down tube, seat tube, top tube, on the fork if you're a bikepackering type, or under the down tube by the bottom bracket; its long and thin shape means it will fit in all of these places with little interference.

If you do mount it under the down tube, be aware that it will get covered in any wet and mud you splash through, which will make access to the contents a bit of a gikky concern. Thankfully, the bag is made from PVC-backed ripstop nylon so will defiantly shrug off damp and grit ingress, although the YKK zip is only water resistant.

2021 Wolf Tooth B-RAD Pump Bag - zip.jpg

If you can only mount the Pump Bag with the end pair of its mounting holes, whether that's to bottle bosses or a B-RAD base, the other end will want to flex and rattle against the frame, so using the spare Velcro strap to hold it tight against the frame works wonders.

2021 Wolf Tooth B-RAD Pump Bag - base.jpg

There's any number of on bike storage solutions to choose from these days that can strap and bolt to tubes and bars and saddles and seatposts, so it's tricky to stand out, but the B-RAD Pump Bag is a nice little thing. Its slender shape keeps it relatively innocuous on the bike, if that sort of thing matters to you, and it will certainly relieve your pockets of storage duties.

> Cycling luggage for beginners: find out the best ways to carry stuff on your bike

In size and shape it's similar to the Apidura Racing Long Top Tube Pack but the Wolf Tooth is less feature heavy and isn't constrained to being attached to the top tube. The Apidura is also more expensive at £72.

If you wanted to carry a lot more stuff then the bigger and more bikepackery Wildcat Ocelot might be more your bag – but it'll cost you £105.

> 26 of the best bikepacking bags – how to choose lightweight luggage

The Evoc Multi Frame Pack is another option, with a certain level of strap adaptability to fit a variety of frame positions; it's a similar price (£40) but half the capacity.

Conclusion

Bigger than most seat packs yet smaller than a frame bag, the Pump Bag will fit most of what you might need for a good day out, but squeezing all your on-bike kit and kaboodle requirements into it can be a bit of a jigsaw challenge, and it does help to make sure it's tightly packed so your stuff doesn't rattle about. But the option of having the bag strapped or bolted on the bike, or attached via the separate B-RAD base, means the Pump Bag should fit to any bike, no matter what weird and wonderful tube configurations, shapes and bends it might have.

Verdict

Handy, unobtrusive storage for a pump and other bits, with the option to strap or bolt it on making it both adaptable and secure

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road.cc test report

Make and model: Wolf Tooth B-RAD Pump Bag

Size tested: One

Tell us what the product is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Wolf Tooth says this low-profile Pump Bag is named for the 12-inch pump it can carry comfortably, but that's just the beginning. The bag is large enough for a pair of 29er tubes or lightweight jacket, wallet and even a cell phone. The Pump Bag has four mounting grommets that mate with the B-RAD 3 or 4 base, frame water cage bosses, or top tube fuel tank bosses. It can also be strapped to most frame tubes using the included silicone-backed hook and loop straps.

It's a good slender bag for carrying a mini-pump and few other bits and bobs; considering the size of cell phones these days, that's quite a big ask.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

Wolf Tooth lists these features:

Holds pumps up to 12 inches or 30cm long with room to spare for tubes, phones, tools, clothing and other ride essentials.

Weight: 114g

Dimensions: 12 in x 2.5 in x 2.5 in (30 cm x 6.5 cm x 6.5 cm)

1.9 liter capacity

Silicone-backed straps fit tubes up to 2.5 inches in diameter

Material: PVC backed 420D ripstop Nylon for added protection against the elements, water resistant YKK zipper

Mounting hardware: T25 Torx

Made in the USA

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
9/10

It's a well made and solid bag.

Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10

As a frame-mounted bag it does very well, marked up for both bolt-on and strap-on attachment but marked down a little for shape that can make packing a fiddle.

Rate the product for durability:
 
8/10

The PVC-backed 420D ripstop nylon material is tough and it's strongly stitched together so looks like it will survive a lot of rides, whether that's on your road, gravel or mountain bike.

Rate the product for weight (if applicable)
 
6/10

It's not a light bag, but it's tough.

Rate the product for comfort (if applicable)
 
8/10

If we can call comfort not getting in the way and unobtrusiveness then it scores highly.

Rate the product for value:
 
7/10

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

There are A LOT of bags about to stuff your spares and riding bits in and then strap to your bike. This Wolf Tooth option does it rather well, the straps or bolts choice makes it adaptable to most bikes and lets you choose your level of removability and security. It holds an eponymous pump easily but it can be a fiddle to fit other bits around it. Rufty tufty construction makes if great for mountain biking or bikepacking.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

Great size for fitting a day's stuff in, bag profile made it unobtrusive, mounting options and adaptability were handy.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

Filling it with required spares and gubbins took a little practice to do it efficiently.

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

Among those we've tested, in size and shape it's similar to the Apidura Racing Long Top Tube Pack, though it's less feature heavy, but the Apidura is £72. Wildcat's Ocelot is a bigger option – for £105 – and the Evoc Multi Frame Pack is a similar price but half the capacity.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes. A handily sized bag for a good day's riding spares.

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Yes

Use this box to explain your overall score

It's very good: a usefully sized and sturdy storage system to hold all you should need in the way of pump, spares and gubbins for a long day's ride. Its shape is great in that it sits neatly against a frame but does make it fiddly to pack. Can be strapped to your bike or bolted to it for extra security, which is a bonus.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 50  Height: 180cm  Weight: 73kg

I usually ride: It varies as to the season.  My best bike is: The one I\'m on at the time

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: road racing, cyclo cross, general fitness riding, fixed/singlespeed, mtb, Fun

Jo Burt has spent the majority of his life riding bikes, drawing bikes and writing about bikes. When he's not scribbling pictures for the whole gamut of cycling media he writes words about them for road.cc and when he's not doing either of those he's pedaling. Then in whatever spare minutes there are in between he's agonizing over getting his socks, cycling cap and bar-tape to coordinate just so. And is quietly disappointed that yours don't He rides and races road bikes a bit, cyclo-cross bikes a lot and mountainbikes a fair bit too. Would rather be up a mountain.

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