Support road.cc

Like this site? Help us to make it better.

TECH NEWS

Canyon launches all-new Endurace CFR as “arguably the fastest endurance road bike ever made”: First look + video

There’s a new Endurace CF SLX too; updated models offer improved aerodynamics, increased tyre clearance, storage inside the frame, and adjustable handlebar width

Canyon has introduced new Endurace CFR and CF SLX endurance bikes that offer space for tyres up to 35mm wide, internal storage, adjustable handlebar width, and improved aerodynamic efficiency. Canyon says the new bikes offer both comfort and speed, describing the CFR as “arguably the fastest endurance road bike ever made”. Here’s everything you need to know along with our initial impressions having ridden the Canyon Endurace CFR Di2.

2023 Canyon Endurace CF SLX - 1.jpeg

“The all-new Endurace CFR and CF SLX ranges take the Endurace’s signature speed and benchmark compliance to a whole new level, and add in a fine-tuneable fit and sleek integration to enhance every ride,” says Canyon.

These new bikes sit above the entry-level carbon Endurace CF, aluminium Endurace AL, and rim brake-equipped Endurace RB, Canyon having introduced updated versions of these early last year.

Handlebar borrowed from the Aeroad

Canyon has added its CP0018 Aerocockpit (combined handlebar and stem) to the Endurance CFR and CF SLX bikes for the first time. This is the width-adjustable bar that first appeared on Canyon’s Aeroad aero road bike.

2023 Canyon Endurace CF SLX - 6 (1).jpeg

“[The CP0018] solves the problem many riders have with fully integrated cockpit setups, removing complexity and adding adjustability for a dialled-in fit and travel practicality,” says Canyon.

2023 Canyon Endurace handlebar - 1.jpeg

“The CP0018 places a wide range of adjustments in the rider’s hands that can be carried out in minutes. By providing three distinct, frame size-dependent width positions and a selection of different spacers, riders can choose from up to 12 clean configurations, with 15mm of height (in 5 mm increments) and 40 mm width adjustment (in 20mm increments), to fine-tune their position.”

Everything you need to make the adjustments is included with the bike.

Top tube now offers internal storage

The updated Endurace CFR and CF SLX are Canyon’s first road bikes to offer storage within the frame. Access is via a cover at the front end of the top tube. The idea is that you can store away maintenance essentials ready for when they’re required.

2023 Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 - top tube compartment open 2.jpg

“Our LOAD Top Tube Storage system neatly stows vital tools away for extra peace of mind on every ride,” says Canyon. “The padded neoprene Tool Sleeve seamlessly houses the Canyon 3-in-1 Mintool, comprising a ratchet with eight tool bits, a Dynaplug and CO2 inflator, a 16g CO2 cartridge and Canyon Slim Tyre Levers.”

2023 Canyon Endurace Neoprene tool sleeve - 1.jpeg

All Endurace CFR and CF SLX bikes are sold with the neoprene sleeve included, but not with the tools installed. You can either buy them individually or as a bundle when ordering or later on via canyon.com.

You get increased tyre clearance

Canyon has increased frame and fork spacing on the Endurace CFR and CF SLX bikes to allow the use of tyres up to 35mm wide, bringing them into line with the latest Endurance CF that was introduced last year.

2023 Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 - fork clearance.jpg

“It has been well documented that wider tyres run at lower pressures roll faster in real-world conditions, while the extra volume also acts as suspension to deliver a smoother ride,” says Canyon

“The Endurace is certainly more capable now thanks to that extra clearance, ready for rough roads and smooth dirt excursions if that’s the terrain you have on your doorstep,” says Canyon.

That said, the Endurace is still very much a road bike rather than a gravel bike. Although fitting 35mm tyres would allow you to tackle well-maintained gravel, Canyon says, “For a true mixed terrain setup, riders will be more at home on bikes like the Grail and Grizl that are dedicated gravel bikes with the tyre clearance and frame geometries to match.”

The bikes aren’t shipped with 35mm tyres, though.

2023 Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 - seat tube shape.jpg

“All Endurace CFR and Endurace CF SLX models are equipped with wide 32mm tyres at the rear as most of the rider’s weight is transferred through the rear wheel,” says Canyon. “Up front we fit 30mm rubber to strike a balance between compliance, rolling resistance and aerodynamic performance.

“Modern 22mm internal width rims are featured across the Endurace CFR and CF SLX range, and naturally, all tyres and rims are tubeless-ready.”

Canyon promises improved aerodynamics

Although aerodynamics might not be top of your priorities list for an endurance bike, Canyon is keen to point out that “aero optimisation is a benefit for all riders [and] the longer you ride for, the more it matters”. With this in mind, it has worked with long-term aero partner Swiss Side on the new Endurace models.

“Key to this partnership is a balanced approach to aero optimisation while not losing sight of core performance characteristics like handling and stiffness-to-weight – the goal is the fastest bikes out in the real world, not just in a CFD [computational fluid dynamics] simulation,” says Canyon.

2023 Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 - head tube badge.jpg

“The front end of the bike with surfaces first exposed to the wind is where the biggest gains are to be made. On the Endurace CFR and CF SLX, a clean front end is ensured thanks to our CP0018 Aerocockpit configuration that not only removes exposed lines and cables but also enables a narrower head tube that further reduces frontal surface area. This approach is extended to the new forks that are sleeker in profile with a longer chord than the previous Endurace, as well as in the new, more slender down tube construction.”

Canyon says that all of these changes have resulted in “a significant 7-watt improvement over the previous Endurace measured at 45 km/h [28mph]”. In other words, you’ll be able to hold that speed while putting out less power, according to Canyon.

Geometry designed for comfort

As you’d expect, the Endurace bikes are built to geometries that are a little more relaxed than those of Canyon’s full-on race bikes.

2023 Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 - head tube.jpg

“Taking size medium as a reference, the Endurace possesses a 27mm higher stack and 15mm shorter reach resulting in a less aggressive 1.56 stack-to-reach ratio over the Ultimate’s 1.43.” says Canyon.

“The result of this approach is a more open fit… that enables the rider to sit slightly more upright, reducing pressure on the lower back, core and shoulders.”

Both the new Endurace CFR and Endurace CF SLX come in eight frame sizes from 3XS to 2XL, designed for riders from 152cm to over 200cm tall.

“As on previous Endurace generations, size 2XS and 3XS bikes now roll on more proportional 650B wheels for consistent handling across all frame sizes,” says Canyon.

S15 VCLS 2.0 comfort seatpost remains in the range

Canyon’s S15 VCLS 2.0 comfort seatpost remains a feature of the range, and that’s great news as far as we’re concerned. When we reviewed it individually we said that this post “adds a good dollop of seated comfort without much weight penalty”.

> Read our Canyon S15 VCLS 2.0 CF Seatpost review

2023 Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 - saddle and seat post.jpg

“It uses an ingenious leaf-spring arrangement to give a more comfortable ride, a much more noticeable improvement than on most other ‘comfort-enhancing’ seatposts,” said our reviewer Jez Ash.

The two carbon blades can flex up to 20mm to smooth the ride.

No mudguard attachments

Many riders, particularly those from the UK, like to see mudguard attachments on an endurance bike, but Canyon has decided not to include them.

“In order to maintain the desired handling characteristics without having to extend the wheelbase too much to achieve the required ISO (International Organization for Standardization) foot clearance, we decided to forgo fixed fender compatibility on the new Endurace CFR and CF SLX,” says Canyon. “Riders who value fenders for all-seasons riding in wet conditions can find great solutions in our Grail and Grizl line-ups.”

What’s the difference between the Endurace CFR and the CF SLX?

The Endurace CFR and CF SLX share many features. All models offer top tube storage, the width-adjustable Canyon CP0018 Aerocockpit, and the S15 VCLS 2.0 seatpost, for example. They share the same geometries too, but the framesets are made differently.

2023 Canyon Endurace CFR - 1.jpeg

“The frame and forks on the Endurace CFR are created using the highest grades of carbon and precision manufacturing processes to deliver class-leading stiffness-to-weight, tipping the scales 100g below the new Endurace CF SLX,” says Canyon.

2023 Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 - frame detail.jpg

The Canyon Endurace CFR bikes are built up with top-level groupsets too: Shimano Dura-Ace Di2, SRAM Red AXS, and Campagnolo Super Record WRL.

The Canyon Endurace CF SLX bikes are built up with second and third tier groupsets from Shimano and SRAM.

What models are available?

Endurace CFR

Endurace CFR WRL
Groupset Campagnolo Super Record WRL
Wheels Campagnolo Bora Ultra WTO
Claimed weight 7.2kg
Price £9,499

Endurace CFR Di2
Groupset Shimano Dura-Ace Di2, Shimano Spider Power Meter
Wheels DT Swiss ERC 1100
Claimed weight 7.3kg
Price £8,999

Endurace CFR AXS
Groupset SRAM Red AXS, Quarq Spider Power Meter
Wheels DT Swiss ERC 1100
Claimed weight 7.3kg
Price £8,999

 
Endurace CF SLX

Endurace CF SLX 8 AXS
Groupset
SRAM Force AXS, Quarq Spider Power Meter
Wheels DT Swiss ERC 1400
Claimed weight 7.8kg
Price £5,249

Endurace CF SLX 8 Aero
Groupset
Shimano Ultegra Di2, 4iiii Power Meter
Wheels DT Swiss ERC 1400
Claimed weight 7.8kg
Price £4,999

Endurace CF SLX 8 Di2
Groupset
Shimano Ultegra Di2, 4iiii Power Meter
Wheels DT Swiss Endurance LN
Claimed weight 8.3kg
Price £3,999

Endurace CF SLX 7 AXS
Groupset
SRAM Rival AXS, Quarq Spindle Power Meter
Wheels DT Swiss Endurance LN
Claimed weight 8.7kg
Price £3,849

Endurace CF SLX 7 Di2
Groupset
Shimano 105 Di2, 4iiii Power Meter
Wheels DT Swiss Endurance LN
Claimed weight 8.5kg
Price £3,499

Our initial impressions of the Canyon Endurace CFR Di2...

We’ve had a Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 here at road.cc ahead of the launch and Stu Kerton has been riding it. We’ll run a full review soon but, in the meantime, here are Stu’s initial thoughts on the new bike.

2023 Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 - top tube.jpg

“I’ve spent a bit of time aboard the Endurace CFR Di2 and it feels brilliantly balanced throughout, making it what I’d call a ‘real-world road bike’.

“It’s quick – very quick indeed – and while plenty of that is down to some very impressive frame and fork stiffness, plus the sub-7.5kg weight of this Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 model, the majority of it comes from the bike’s compliance and the geometry.

2023 Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 - top tube compartment.jpg

“It behaves very much like a race bike, responding well to being ridden hard, and the way it is set up and designed means that it can be ridden flat out on even the poorest of surfaces, helped by the wider tyres and the flex from the VCLS seatpost.

“The geometry works alongside those two, with the front-end measurements and angles just taking the edge off the steering speed, bringing with it a feeling of control and confidence in areas where the surface beneath you would normally recommend backing off the pace on a more aggressive, race-specific machine.

2023 Canyon Endurace CFR Di2 - seat tube junction.jpg

“If you don’t want to ride on the rivet full-time, the Endurace is the ideal machine for tackling those long-distance challenges, whether personal or competitive. The ride position feels relaxed and easy to live with and if you ease back into a more sedate pace, it doesn’t lose that responsive feel.

“So far, I’d describe riding the Endurace as rewarding.”

We'll have a full review on road.cc too. In the meantime, get more details from canyon.com.

Mat has been in cycling media since 1996, on titles including BikeRadar, Total Bike, Total Mountain Bike, What Mountain Bike and Mountain Biking UK, and he has been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. Mat has been road.cc technical editor for over a decade, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. We send him off around the world to get all the news from launches and shows too. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer. Now over 50, he's riding road and gravel bikes most days for fun and fitness rather than training for competitions.

Add new comment

21 comments

Avatar
bob05ch | 5 months ago
0 likes

Can you add tri bars to an aerohandlebar such as this one?

Avatar
OnYerBike replied to bob05ch | 5 months ago
0 likes

Aero handlebars typically require bespoke clip-on tri bars. Some brands sell them e.g. Giant for the Propel but otherwise no, not without replacing the whole cockpit. As far as I can tell, Canyon don't make one for this handlebar.  

Avatar
matthewn5 | 6 months ago
0 likes

I've never wanted to adjust handlebar width once I got a set of bars.

I have wanted to change stem length - but with this bar you're locked in forever.

It's a pretty weird idea I think, that adds weight and as we've seen, adds to the risk of handlebar failure.

Avatar
Inthesun | 6 months ago
0 likes

As someone who regularly uses a top tube bag, that 'hidden' compartment is a deal breaker (plus looks kind of weird)

Avatar
OnYerBike replied to Inthesun | 6 months ago
0 likes

Is there a reason you couldn't use a strap-on top tube bag as well? The cover looks pretty flush to me so I don't see a reason it wouldn't work. You couldn't access the compartment without first removing the top tube bag, but assuming you use the compartment as suggested for things like puncture repair which you only need to access once in a blue moon, it wouldn't seem to be a deal breaker to me.

Avatar
amartin | 6 months ago
0 likes

Full disclosure: Owner of Endurace CF SLX Di2 2022 model - love it

A couple of thoughts:

When i bought mine the 'lack' of a CFR tier made sense to me as there are no pros riding a canyon factory racing version. It was (until now) the best spec'ed bike out there.

The new 'CFR' Endurace gives you a gimmick (neoprene sock) which introduces a structural weakness in the frame and a questionable 'upgrade' in the shape of the CP0018. You will still have to swap if the reach doesnt work for you.

You are paying almost GBP 2000 for the privilege (and a weight penalty) and for what is an almost identical bike (no-one will ever use the 35 mm clearance)

 The 'SLX' designation is now meaningless (5th tier DT swiss wheels ???) and unfortunately no longer value for money. 

Meh. 

Avatar
quiff replied to amartin | 6 months ago
0 likes
amartin wrote:

The new 'CFR' Endurace gives you a gimmick (neoprene sock) which introduces a structural weakness in the frame and a questionable 'upgrade' in the shape of the CP0018. You will still have to swap if the reach doesnt work for you.

You are paying almost GBP 2000 for the privilege 

 The 'SLX' designation is now meaningless (5th tier DT swiss wheels ???) and unfortunately no longer value for money. 

The neoprene sock and CP0018 feature on all the CF SLX models too (starting at £3,499) so you're not paying £2,000 for those. The price premium for the CFR gets you a 100g lighter frame, and higher tier groupset and wheels.

Personally I quite like that they're offering the CF SLX with a choice of second tier wheels or lower tier ones for £1,000 less.

And while the new features / changes may not interest you, I suspect the price hasn't increased (much) from the previous model, which is a pleasant surprise at the moment.      

 

Avatar
Wales56 | 6 months ago
0 likes

I wonder if they've changed the frames of the new CF SLX to be like the old CF SL ones. The 'old' CF SLX was supposed to weigh 820g for the medium size with a 300g fork, and the 'old' CF SLX 9 Di2 was only 6.88kg in total - but the new CFR is 7.3kg with almost the same specs. Why are these frames heavier now?

On the bright side, the prices of the new SLXs don't seem too bad compared to the last Endurance CF SLX 9.0 Di2 that came out in 2016 for £5099.

(Also, I wouldn't ride these in winter (Scotland) with such fancy gear, regarding mudguard debate, with or without - I don't have money to waste .....)

 

- TURNS OUT:

Canyon insists the weight gain is a worthy tradeoff for what you get in return.

“The Endurace CFR Di2 is 500 g heavier than its predecessor, the Endurace CF SLX 9, the latter being comparable in terms of equipment (Endurace CFR Di2: 7.38 kg; Endurace CF SLX 9: 6.88 kg),” explained Canyon’s global communications manager, Ben Hillsdon. “The additional weight was a conscious investment to offer our customers a better riding experience and greater usability. For example, the CP0018 cockpit and the associated interface on the fork shaft are heavier than the conventional cockpit solution on its predecessor, but offer the unique possibility of width and height adjustment without the need to adjust the cable lengths. The storage compartment in the top tube also makes the frame slightly heavier because the tube wall thicknesses had to be increased. 

“In return, though, customers can store their repair kit in a uniquely elegant way (and save the weight of a saddle bag, by the way). The aerodynamic optimization of the frame has also made the frame a bit heavier, as can be seen from the increased use of material, especially on the seat tube. The bottom line is that the new Endurace may be a bit heavier than its predecessor, but in terms of its unique features, improved riding experience, and the associated greater complexity of the frameset, it is still an extremely light bike, especially in comparison with its direct competitors.”

The new Endurace CF SLX and CFR join the previously updated (and subtly different) Endurace CF and Endurace Al models that were updated in 2022.

2024 Canyon Endurace CF SLX review - Escape Collective https://escapecollective.com/2024-canyon-endurace-cf-review/

 

Avatar
henryb | 6 months ago
1 like

Is this only available with electronic shifting?

Avatar
momove replied to henryb | 6 months ago
0 likes

Can't see exactly from the photos, but the frame doesn't look like it has the ability to run shifitng cables.

Sweet looking frame though!

Avatar
AidanR | 6 months ago
4 likes

The fastest endurance bike? I feel that rather misses the point of what an endurance bike is.

Avatar
quiff replied to AidanR | 6 months ago
1 like

Not sure about that. Plenty of people want to strike a balance between comfort and speed, but there are different ways to strike it - see e.g. the wide range of bikes on an audax. They're just saying they've gone for the racier end of the endurance spectrum.

Dusky blue with Force please. What, no mudguards? Ok, pass.     

Also, in what world is an adjustable width handlebar "reducing complexity"?

Avatar
the little onion | 6 months ago
5 likes

No proper  mudguard compatibility on an endurance bike? Clearly not designed sufficiently for the british market. 

Avatar
momove replied to the little onion | 6 months ago
0 likes

Or anywhere really. Britain isn't the only place it rains!

Avatar
wycombewheeler replied to the little onion | 6 months ago
0 likes
the little onion wrote:

No proper  mudguard compatibility on an endurance bike? Clearly not designed sufficiently for the british market. 

There are plenty of people riding endurance frames who never run mudguards.

Just because they want to go on long rides, doesn't mean they have to do it in the rain.

Avatar
Cugel replied to wycombewheeler | 6 months ago
3 likes
wycombewheeler wrote:
the little onion wrote:

No proper  mudguard compatibility on an endurance bike? Clearly not designed sufficiently for the british market. 

There are plenty of people riding endurance frames who never run mudguards.

Just because they want to go on long rides, doesn't mean they have to do it in the rain.

Do you ride a bike?  Even if one is a fair weather cyclist (and I am a bit of a one) most of my rides in later autumn, winter and early spring are on wet and mucky roads. This is the nature of many places where the rain collects in the landscape then runs off over the roads, taking its time to evaporate from them during the colder months.

When I rode with a club, those who failed to put on the full mudguard (including long rear dangle flap) would be subject to the snark, moan or even whines about their filth-throwing rear wheel. Mind, poor or no mudguards was a a good excuse to ride at the back, well sheltered from the wintry blasts.

But I digress. 

This bike looks like another designed via current fashion fad rather than functionality. "Aero". Ha!

Avatar
Surreyrider replied to Cugel | 6 months ago
0 likes

The basic shape of the frame looks largely unchanged from more than a decade ago.

Avatar
cyclisto replied to Cugel | 6 months ago
0 likes

Living in a really dry place and almost no recreational road cyclist uses mudguards. If they want to go for a ride they will definitely check weather first, and looks, aerodynamics and weight are too important for installing fenders. I love fenders but I only commute.

Avatar
Steve K replied to the little onion | 6 months ago
0 likes
the little onion wrote:

No proper  mudguard compatibility on an endurance bike? Clearly not designed sufficiently for the british market. 

Also, why would adding mudguard mounts require a change to the wheelbase length?

Avatar
quiff replied to Steve K | 6 months ago
1 like

I would guess it's more that adding mudguards to those mounts to clear a 28+mm tyre would create risk of toe-verlap unless they tweaked the geometry.

Avatar
Rendel Harris replied to Steve K | 6 months ago
1 like
Steve K wrote:

why would adding mudguard mounts require a change to the wheelbase length?

Quote:

“In order to maintain the desired handling characteristics without having to extend the wheelbase too much to achieve the required ISO (International Organization for Standardization) foot clearance, we decided to forgo fixed fender compatibility on the new Endurace CFR and CF SLX,” said Canyon.

I'm guessing that the ISO regulations are that if you provide the mounts for mudguards then the bike has to be able to offer the required toe clearance with guards on, so if it's just within the tolerance without guards they would have to find an extra 10 mm or so at the front to meet the standard with them.

 

Latest Comments