Support road.cc

Like this site? Help us to make it better.

news

“Covid-19 can suck my ass” says Rohan Dennis as world champion breaks quarantine

Team Ineos rider deletes social media accounts after defying Spanish lockdown by going for a drive

World time trial champion Rohan Dennis has deleted his social media accounts after posting a picture on Instagram of him going for a drive in defiance of Spain’s strict lockdown rules, with the Team Ineos rider saying, “Covid-19 can suck my ass.”

The 29-year-old shared a picture on Instagram yesterday taken from the wheel of his car, pulled over at the roadside, and said: “Day 34 – cracked and left the house. #covid19 can suck my ass and so can #quarantine.”

Dennis, who successfully retained his world time trial title in Harrogate last September, lives in the pro cycling hotspot of Girona in Spain’s Catalonia region. He has subsequently deleted both his Instagram and Twitter accounts.

Under emergency legislation in Catalonia, people there are only allowed to leave their homes to undertake essential shopping trips to supermarkets or pharmacies and to travel to work. Travel for leisure purposes remains forbidden.

Susan Westemeyer, who works on Israel Start-Up Nation’s media team, posted a screengrab of his original Instagram post to Twitter with the comment, “I think it’s safe to say that Rohan Dennis is not coping well at the moment.”

One person replying to Dennis’s post said: “You could just go for a drive and not post it on social media and don’t have the back lash?”

In response, Dennis said: “Or I could show the reality of the situation and not be one of your beloved drones who show their ‘perfect world’ as an elite athlete. Which one would you like. Real or fake?”

Dennis hit the headlines last summer when he abandoned the Tour de France midway through a stage on the eve of an individual time trial that, as world champion, he was one of the favourites to win.

It proved to be his final race for the Bahrain-Merida team, which finally terminated his contract when he successfully defended his world title in Harrogate using not one of its sponsor’s bikes, but an unbadged BMC Time Machine similar to the one he had ridden 12 months earlier to win the rainbow jersey in Innsbruck.

> Rohan Dennis says ‘mental struggles’ led him to abandon Tour de France

Speaking to the press at the Tour Down Under earlier this year, Dennis revealed that he had been struggling with mental health issues at the Tour de France and had left the race to save his marriage to former professional cyclist, Melissa Hoskins.

"It was for personal family reasons between the person I was becoming due to the situation I was put under. The environment that I was in was causing me to be, let's just say, not a good or a happy person to be around," he said.

"It was snowballing, it was getting worse and, in the end, I didn't want to be a statistic of a sportsperson who was potentially going to be divorced."

Team Ineos have not yet made a statement on Dennis breaking quarantine in Spain, although team principal Sir Dave Brailsford said earlier this week that it was important to follow instructions from the relevant authorities.

> Sir Dave Brailsford: Team Ineos could withdraw from Tour de France if health at risk

Speaking in response to the announcement that the start of the Tour de France had been postponed by two months until the end of August, he said: “There will be a lot of debate generated about the rights and wrongs of the transitions out of lockdown across all aspects of society including sporting events.

“Equally most people recognise that the learning from transitioning out of lockdown will only take place once it begins. We will monitor the situation very carefully and of course take note of national guidance and all advice.”

Simon joined road.cc as news editor in 2009 and is now the site’s community editor, acting as a link between the team producing the content and our readers. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, he has reported on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, the latest developments in the bike industry and the sport’s biggest races. Now back in London full-time after 15 years living in Oxford and Cambridge, he loves cycling along the Thames but misses having his former riding buddy, Elodie the miniature schnauzer, in the basket in front of him.

Add new comment

32 comments

Avatar
Russell Orgazoid | 4 years ago
1 like

What a solid gold dildo Rohan is.

Avatar
James Warrener | 4 years ago
0 likes

Let's hope his team are helping him and getting to the bottom of why he felt this way.

If he supports support then give it him.

Avatar
handlebarcam | 4 years ago
4 likes

I'm not convinced Rohan Dennis has diagnosable mental health issues. He may well just be an arsehole. Who hasn't known some little prick who cannot stand not being the centre of attention? Every teacher in the world would be able to tell you as much within two minutes of meeting him, just as every teacher in the world knows what's wrong with Donald Trump. Hell, anyone who was even slightly ahead of their class when at school could tell you. If you didn't know someone like that when you were a kid, then you may have been that person. Some grow out of it, some don't.

Avatar
Captain Badger replied to handlebarcam | 4 years ago
0 likes

Of course, being an arsehole and having diagnosable mental health conditions are not mutually exclusive. It is even possible that episodes of being an arsehole coincide with episodes of ill health.

Folk usually aren't at their best when ill, something which may be borne in mind whilst casting judgement on someone's arsholery (without actually having to agree with/condone it)

I was a teacher. In spite of every teacher in the world being able to tell which kids were "arseholes", it always seemed quite a coincidence that the diagnosis was, in the main, proportional to how much grief this particular arsehole causes in my working life. I got fed up with teaching, and left. I wasn't skilled enough (or strong enough for that matter) to cope with the kids that really needed the help - most of whom were arseholes (when matched against the above definition).

Avatar
Carton | 4 years ago
5 likes

He might have mental issues aggravated by the quarantine. He might also be a bit of a diva who throws pernicious, pointless, puerile, prissy tantrums. 

The first thing is possibly true, but I am rather uncomfortable at how readily people are speculating on it. The second one is, methinks, quite evident.

The salient point is, however, that the second possibility does automatically excuse the first. Particularly given that not only does he not apologize for the things he does, he does not seem to show any contrition at any point after the fact. 

I mean, say a millionaire you did not know ran a non-essential business which they decided to open against government health advice and further choose to publicize it on social media. Let’s say they go on to publicly and lewdly rebel against the backlash they get on social media. Would you jump to excuse them as someone possibly dealing with mental health issues that should be quickly sheltered from further criticism? Hopefully you wouldn't call for their businesses to be boycotted and their livelihoods to be destroyed, but I feel some of you might feel that at least a modest critique of their actions would be warranted. 

Avatar
Rick_Rude | 4 years ago
4 likes

It's a load of cock. The Spanish have cracked the walnut with a hammer. If he lived in the UK and had been stopped by the filth riding we'd all be claiming police fascism. The Spanish response is either too extreme or fits a cultural problem of Spaniards not being able to be sensible about distancing.

We should have locked the over 60s up and carried on with life. I read a stat which claimed 95% of coronavirus victims would have died this year anyway and 90% had underlying health problems.

Avatar
AlsoSomniloquism replied to Rick_Rude | 4 years ago
6 likes

Hmm interesting statistics but even if true, you do realise they do not contain the whole facts?

My wife has bad Asthma. If she gets it she is at signiifcant risk. Her dad, who died the other year, lived with a heart disease for 30 odd years from when he had a heart attack in his 50's. Both are underlying health conditions which meant if they had caught it now and potentially died, they would have been recorded of dying with an underlying health condition. 
Neither would have been ones that would have killed them though otherwise (her dad died of a Brain anuerysm for example, not because of the heart disease). 

You also do realise that the majority of the lockdown is to control the spread so the hospitals don't get overwhelmed so you could still be treated if you get knocked off your bike or get something else non-covid related which meant you needed treatment in a hospital or ICU. 

Finally, the age of hospitalisation is not 60 and above, it is approx 1 in 20 of confirmed infections that could need hospitalisation. It is then about 2-3 of those that need ICU. BlowJo should show you that. 

And currently 30 NHS staff have given their lives treating people who have been affected. 

 

Avatar
Simon E replied to Rick_Rude | 4 years ago
4 likes

There's no such thing as a simple solution to a complex problem.

And what about the health workers on the front line, exposed to the virus through necessity with inadequate or no PPE? They're not old and primed for a wooden box but too many of them have died already and this thing is far from over.

Avatar
Captain Badger replied to Rick_Rude | 4 years ago
2 likes

That may or may not be true. This illness essentially loads your annual risk of death for a year into the fortnight that you suffer from it (even taking into account age and fitness), so at face value what you say doesn't sound unreasonable.

However the reason we're locked down is less for our own personal safety, but to stop the country's essential services being overwhelmed

Imagine that in a given fortnight 50% of the population were exposed. On the risks mentioned above, that would bring half the deaths we would expect in a year (approx 300,000) into one fortnight.

In the current situation, frontline medical staff are at much higher risk of death as they are working in the "Hot Zone". They are at a high risk of exposure, and that exposure is in a concentrated form. I'm not sure what the figures are here but it is clear that their risk of infection is much increased, as is their risk of succumbing if they do show symptoms. 

The medical services are currently being overwhelmed with  CV related cases. This is currently less than a half a percentage point of the UK population - the other risk factors continue, so who will be able to take care of "business as usual"? What happens when the % infection rate gets into single digits?

Also, anyone working with the dead is at increased risk - a little-remembered service that is almost as important as working with the living.

It's easy to feel that we are in a "phoney war" (for example, I find that apart from working from home, and altered shopping habits things are little changed), but this is not actually the case.

 

Avatar
disherwood replied to Rick_Rude | 4 years ago
0 likes

....

you may now flush, wash your hands for the correct length of time and exit the little boys room

Avatar
Rik Mayals unde... | 4 years ago
1 like

On another topic, he has rather nice taste in cars. That looks like a classic 964 911 dashboard.

Avatar
Jem PT replied to Rik Mayals underpants | 4 years ago
0 likes

biker phil wrote:

On another topic, he has rather nice taste in cars. That looks like a classic 964 911 dashboard.

Indeed!

Avatar
jollygoodvelo replied to Rik Mayals underpants | 4 years ago
1 like

biker phil wrote:

On another topic, he has rather nice taste in cars. That looks like a classic 964 911 dashboard.

It also looks like he's about to run out of petrol.

Avatar
ibr17xvii | 4 years ago
2 likes

As someone who followed him on Insta you could see his posts get more "erratic" so it was only ever going 1 way.

Avatar
Xenophon2 | 4 years ago
6 likes

Little princess acting up again.  All of Spain, including kids cooped up for 5 weeks, thousands of dead.  But precious feels he's special and can go out.  They ought to take a whip to his ass.  He's more trouble than he's worth, I don't care how well he races when EVERYTHING is just to his liking.

Avatar
Rich_cb replied to Xenophon2 | 4 years ago
7 likes

Alternatively:

Man with documented mental health difficulties finds lockdown incredibly challenging.

Avatar
Xenophon2 replied to Rich_cb | 4 years ago
1 like

Rich_cb wrote:

Alternatively: Man with documented mental health difficulties finds lockdown incredibly challenging.

Special institutions exist where those who are unable to control those difficulties or urges and thus endager others are managed:  asylums.  

Avatar
Rich_cb replied to Xenophon2 | 4 years ago
5 likes

Firstly may I congratulate you on mastering time travel. A truly incredible achievement to travel to 2020 from the Victorian era.

However, in between collecting your Nobel prize and letting me know next week's lottery numbers you might want to find the time to read up on the modern treatment of mental health conditions.

Congratulations again!

Avatar
Boss Hogg replied to Rich_cb | 4 years ago
3 likes

So you're endorsing Dennis' reckless behaviour? Or what exactly are you trying to say?

Avatar
Rich_cb replied to Boss Hogg | 4 years ago
3 likes

Don't judge a man until you've walked a mile in his shoes.

Lockdown is incredibly tough on an individual's mental health especially those with pre existing difficulties.

Avatar
Chuck replied to Boss Hogg | 4 years ago
1 like

Boss Hogg wrote:

So you're endorsing Dennis' reckless behaviour?

How did you get from what he said to that?

 

Avatar
LRTom replied to Xenophon2 | 4 years ago
4 likes

Xenophon2 wrote:

Special institutions exist where those who are unable to control those difficulties or urges and thus endager others are managed:  asylums.  

Embarrassing. 

Avatar
Xenophon2 replied to LRTom | 4 years ago
3 likes

LRTom wrote:

 

Embarrassing. 

In a day and age where the elderly and infirm* (*underlying conditions, presumably physical, not mental, ones) who happen to catch a certain virus are denied access to critical care or indeed hospital care, are left to succumb in their care homes by the hundreds, tended to by staff lacking even basic protection gear and after death are not even counted in the official statistics, I'd use the 'embarrassing' word sparingly.  

He's a twat.  Coat him with sugar and tie a nice ribbon around him, he'll be a decorated twat.

 

 

Avatar
Simon E replied to Xenophon2 | 4 years ago
2 likes

Xenophon2 wrote:

He's a twat.  Coat him with sugar and tie a nice ribbon around him, he'll be a decorated twat.

I thought people were a little more enlightened than this about mental health nowadays.

I would echo Rich_cb's comments about not rushing to judgement. I know that doing this is seemingly in vogue on social media - shoot from the hip and move onto the next victim before giving it a second thought - but it's a thoroughly horrible way to treat other people.

Avatar
Captain Badger replied to Xenophon2 | 4 years ago
0 likes

That he may be, but suggesting that someone should be sectioned for being a twat (for "twat" read "an individual that behaves in ways that I dislike") seems a mite severe. 

 

Avatar
Boss Hogg replied to LRTom | 4 years ago
2 likes

Indeed, Dennis' behaviour is very embarassing and certainly illegal.

Avatar
gibbon replied to Xenophon2 | 4 years ago
4 likes

Fuck my life ,you're a bit of a cunt are'nt you.

Avatar
Steveal replied to Xenophon2 | 4 years ago
3 likes

Xenophon 2,
You appear to have zero understanding of how mental health issues manifest themselves, less understanding on how (poorly) they are managed in many systems and even less empathy, if it were possible. I hope no one you care for ever suffers from mental ill health if this is your likely response. Because you are at risk of sounding like a moron, ignorant or a troll. Or all three.

Avatar
Xenophon2 replied to Steveal | 4 years ago
1 like

My understanding stops dead where a persons' behaviour is both illegal and carries risks to others.  Then they need to be dealt with and the underlying reason matters not one whit.  The only place where that plays a role is when a decision needs to be made about whether the individual needs to be either punished or (compulsory) treated.

Avatar
Captain Badger replied to Xenophon2 | 4 years ago
0 likes

If your understanding has "stopped dead", perhaps you are not in the best position to cast judgement.

I do hope that you are neither part of the medical profession, nor the judiciary.

 

Pages

Latest Comments