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Dame Sarah Storey named Sheffield City Region's frst Active Travel Commissioner

14-time Paralympic champion's new role will see her lead the active travel agenda for the region...

Dame Sarah Storey has been unveiled as active travel commissioner for the Sheffield City Region by its mayor, Dan Jarvis, who in December outlined his plans to get more people cycling, walking and using public transport.

Britain’s most successful female Paralympian with 14 gold medals in swimming and cycling, in the past two years Storey has combined her racing with acting as one of British Cycling’s policy advocates.

Confirmation of her appointment to her new role was made at an event at Sheffield Hallam University today.

She said: "I'm proud and excited to be the first Active Travel Commissioner for the Sheffield City Region. I believe active travel is a less stressful way of moving about, and helps to create the foundation of a happier workforce and a happier population.

"As someone who's passionate about active travel, and through my policy work with British Cycling, I've been so interested in what Chris Boardman is doing with Andy Burnham over the Pennines [in Greater Manchester].

“It's brilliant to have the opportunity to work closely with Mayor Jarvis and his team to do something similar here.

"For me, this is about having another string to my bow, and utilising that profile of elite sport to benefit the wider population,” she added.

“Not everyone is going to be an elite athlete, but we can all enjoy being more active. I'm looking forward to seeing how, together, we can make real changes to the way people travel in the Sheffield City Region."

The region is the fourth in the UK to appoint a commissioner focusing specifically on active travel, joining London, Greater Manchester and the West Midlands, where last week former track and BMX world champion Shanaze Reade was named cycling and walking ambassador.

Jarvis, who was elected in May last year, said: "I'm delighted to name Sarah as our Active Travel Commissioner. To have such an exceptional, inspirational and passionate individual leading our active travel agenda is very exciting.

"Sarah joins us at an exciting time and will play a crucial role in helping us to make sure that active travel remains an absolute priority as we make our region's transport network fit for the 21st century.

"By prioritising active travel, we can improve people’s health, cut carbon emissions and reduce congestion. But you don’t have to be a professional cyclist - or indeed a gold medal winning cyclist - to travel in a more active way. By making little changes to the way that we travel, we can all do our part to create a healthier and more active society."

Storey’s new position will see her work alongside local authorities and community groups and national government, among others, as she leads the active travel agenda in the region, which received Transforming Cities funding last month for schemes in Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield.

Storey’s appointment was welcomed by Cycling UK, which together with Cycle Sheffield drew up a study for the new commissioner on how to improve cycling and walking in the region.

Duncan Dollimore, Cycling UK campaigns manager, said: “Sheffield City Region are to be applauded for their selection of Dame Sarah Storey as their new Cycling and Walking Commissioner.

“She’s such a fantastic inspiration for so many people, and Cycling UK hopes her amazing achievements continue as she makes the Sheffield region a cycling and walking success.

“To help in this process, I hope the study we prepared will act as inspiration for Dame Sarah Storey over the months and years ahead.

“The Sheffield City region has a real opportunity to show the rest of the UK how to make our urban areas places we want to stay and spend time in rather, than pass through rapidly in a car.

“Although this study is based in the Sheffield region, it’s relevant for communities across the United Kingdom, especially for cities and towns crying out for investment,” he added.

“We need to see ring-fenced Government funding for cycling and walking networks to enable councils to make the changes needed to create healthy streets for everyone.”

Simon joined road.cc as news editor in 2009 and is now the site’s community editor, acting as a link between the team producing the content and our readers. A law and languages graduate, published translator and former retail analyst, he has reported on issues as diverse as cycling-related court cases, anti-doping investigations, the latest developments in the bike industry and the sport’s biggest races. Now back in London full-time after 15 years living in Oxford and Cambridge, he loves cycling along the Thames but misses having his former riding buddy, Elodie the miniature schnauzer, in the basket in front of him.

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5 comments

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xerxes | 4 years ago
1 like

That's fantastic; those clever Norwegians.

Avatar
ktache | 4 years ago
1 like

What, like this one from Trondheim?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zipZ5kwhFfs

Avatar
xerxes | 4 years ago
0 likes

I lived in Sheffield for a while, it's hilly, to get more people walking and cycling I suggest some sort of funicular or Stannah Stairlift type arrangement on the steeper ones. cheeky

Avatar
BehindTheBikesheds replied to xerxes | 4 years ago
1 like
xerxes wrote:

I lived in Sheffield for a while, it's hilly, to get more people walking and cycling I suggest some sort of funicular or Stannah Stairlift type arrangement on the steeper ones. cheeky

it's not the hills that are the problem, it never has been, Bristol and Edinburgh has its fair share and Sheffield was a very popular cycling city BITD.

Calling to change the language is all well and good but it doesn't do shit.

The Jeremy Vine spoof of having motor free days with commercial vehicles only having access between certain times and on specific roads would be a start.

Avatar
HarrogateSpa | 4 years ago
2 likes

Well done Dan Jarvis and Sarah Storey. I hope it leads to big, positive changes.

As with Manchester and Boardman, I am envious, but action elsewhere could be an inspiration for North Yorkshire. If not, Harrogate really needs to escape this dinosaur local authority.

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