Support road.cc

Like this site? Help us to make it better.

Residents call for delivery riders to wear numbered jackets to track down cyclists riding dangerously

The group has claimed these cyclists have e-bikes without speed limiters and called on the police and the Scottish parliament to take action

A residents group in Glasgow has called for food delivery riders to wear jackets with identifiable numbers so they can be tracked down and have their insurance and registration checked, while claiming that many cyclists are “careful and courteous riders, but others are putting people’s lives at risk”.

Merchant City and Trongate Community Council (MCTCC), a residents’ forum and pressure group based in Glasgow said that the move is necessary because of the number of “collisions and near misses” that have occurred in the city centre over the past few years and they are calling on both parliaments and police to take action.

The news comes months after the police launched a crackdown on “dangerous” delivery cyclists in the city, following an incident in which a cyclist had been left “terrified” by a crash with a courier riding in the wrong direction in a cycle lane at high speed.

Glasgow Times reports that an MCTCC spokesperson said: “These e-bikers are predominantly food delivery drivers working on behalf of companies like Deliveroo and Just Eat.

> Police crackdown on dangerous delivery cyclists after cycling charity urged companies to do more following cycle lane crash

“Their machines are often not fitted with a speed limiter, restricting them to the UK’s legal maximum level of 15.5 miles per hour. It’s common to see them riding on pavements and pedestrian walkways, often without lights after dusk.

“Many such cyclists are careful and courteous riders, but others are putting people’s lives at risk by driving far too fast in the wrong areas. Making them wear an identifiable jacket or bag would help track down an offender and allow their insurance policy and registration to be checked.

“We are demanding that measures are introduced quickly before more people get hurt – or worse.”

MTCC members said that they have discussed their concerns with senior Glasgow police, MSP Kaukab Stewart and Alison Thewliss, who was the MP for Glasgow Central, and were told meetings have been held with the management of the main food delivery companies.

Kaukab Stewart, MSP for Glasgow Kelvin, said: “After meeting with Merchant City and Trongate Community Council and constituents to hear their concerns, I have written to the Cabinet Secretary for Transport to enquire what powers the Scottish Parliament and local authorities have on introducing any licensing or insurance requirements.

“I take the concerns raised with me very seriously and believe we need to share our travel routes responsibly. I will continue to liaise with Police Scotland regarding this matter, and have been reassured that they are continuing to take action where breaches of the highway code and other relevant legislation are being observed.”

Superintendent Steven Meikle, Greater Glasgow Division, said: “The issue of illegal e-bikes and dangerous riding in the city centre was identified as a top road safety concern, with police receiving complaints directly from the public and other sources.

“In response to complaints, officers have carried out proactive enforcement in the city. Officers have also been speaking to users as our focus is on educating riders on safety and legislative requirements, however, where necessary, we will use enforcement action.

“We all need to be responsible for each other’s safety, and that means cyclists, motorists and pedestrians, have to abide by the rules of the road.”

 

Deliveroo_Rider_Taking_The_Lane_In_Bristol_(32611782273)

> Deliveroo riders' union in call for city centre cycle lane as part of "much-needed change" to support bicycle journeys

Meanwhile, a Just Eat spokesperson has said that the safety of couriers, road users and the public is a “key priority” for the company and all couriers delivering on their behalf “must ensure they follow all local laws and rules of the road”.

They said: “If we are ever made aware that a courier delivering on our behalf has acted in a way that does not uphold the standards we hope to deliver, we do not hesitate in taking action, which could include revoking the courier from our network.”

A spokesperson for Deliveroo added: “Road safety is of the utmost priority for Deliveroo. During the onboarding process, every rider completes a programme of road safety guidance and is required to meet minimum safety standards.

“As with all road users, riders must follow all local traffic laws and road regulations. We also hold regular rider roadshows which involve engagement with local councils and riders on road safety issues relevant to the area.

“If incidents are reported to us we investigate and work with the authorities to take appropriate action where necessary.”

In November, police in Glasgow responded to safety concerns from cyclists and a cycling charity about food delivery couriers riding illegal e-bikes dangerously in the city.

Police Scotland said it was “targeting those riding illegally modified electric bikes capable of going at high speeds”, the comments coming in the same week Cycling Scotland had called on food delivery companies to provide couriers “effective training around cycling safety" and check the bikes they ride “are legal and road-worthy”. 

Cycling Scotland's road safety manager said food delivery companies should be doing more to ensure riders' bikes are legal and effective training on cycling safety is provided.

“A simple thing would be are companies actually checking the bikes that the riders are using to make sure that they are legal?” he said. “If the riders are given effective training around cycling safety, if their bikes are checked to make sure that their bikes are legal and road worthy and if they're given effective training and support and the right safety equipment then I'm sure that would make a difference.”

> Councillor urges delivery riders to learn the Highway Code to ward off licencing or insurance rules that would have a “detrimental impact” on cycling

And in February this year, an SNP councillor from Glasgow urged delivery riders to learn and obey the Highway Code, after his peers brought up a proposal of licence plates of insurance for cyclists due to concerns about traffic offences committed by cyclists.

However, the council confirmed that it will not support such measures, citing a “significant detrimental impact” on active travel. Councillor Millar said: “A licencing system or insurance requirement for delivery riders would likely require legislative change, likely at UK Government level.

“It should be noted that it is unclear how any such legislation or regulations could be targeted at a specific user group as opposed to all people on bikes, and it is not known how it would be enforced.

“The council would not support any general move to introduce licencing requirements for cycling as this would have a significant detrimental impact on our agreed active travel behaviour change efforts.”

Adwitiya joined road.cc in 2023 as a news writer after graduating with a masters in journalism from Cardiff University. His dissertation focused on active travel, which soon threw him into the deep end of covering everything related to the two-wheeled tool, and now cycling is as big a part of his life as guitars and football. He has previously covered local and national politics for Voice Wales, and also likes to writes about science, tech and the environment, if he can find the time. Living right next to the Taff trail in the Welsh capital, you can find him trying to tackle the brutal climbs in the valleys.

Add new comment

47 comments

Avatar
Patrick9-32 | 2 days ago
4 likes

Dear burglars, before you start burgaling could you please register on the central burglar database and prominently display your burglar registration number so you will be easier to catch when you go burgaling. 

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to Patrick9-32 | 2 days ago
3 likes

Patrick9-32 wrote:

Dear burglars, before you start burgaling could you please register on the central burglar database and prominently display your burglar registration number so you will be easier to catch when you go burgaling. 

They rely on the honour system

Avatar
ribena | 4 days ago
2 likes

I think this would just encourage them to use an unbranded bag and jacket to disguise the fact they are delivering at all.

Avatar
bikercub | 4 days ago
1 like

The article says " allow their insurance policy and registration to be checked." This is quite an assumption.

Considering that any delivery rider is earning a living (I use the term loosely) they should be insured for using their vehicle "for hire or reward" whether it is a car, moped, a push bike, pedelec, scooter or e-bike. etc. any vehicle.

I assume insurance companies would refuse cover for illegal e-bikes or scooters and would withdraw cover from registered vehicles that have no MOT or VED.

Does anyone know if an insurance policy that covers hire and reward is available for a pushbike?

 

Avatar
Tom_77 replied to bikercub | 4 days ago
0 likes

bikercub wrote:

 

Does anyone know if an insurance policy that covers hire and reward is available for a pushbike?

Onsi provide insurance to Deliveroo riders (and some other delivery firms).

Avatar
smidgers22@gmail.com replied to bikercub | 4 days ago
1 like

Hi
I do Deliveroo/Uber eats a couple of times a week. It's pretty good money where I am and nice town to cycle in.
Deliveroo provide insurance for bike/e-bike riders. https://riders.deliveroo.co.uk/en/support/new-riders/what-does-deliveroo...
Uber eats do too as far as I'm aware but their parameters are more strict.

Avatar
open_roads replied to smidgers22@gmail.com | 3 days ago
1 like

Actually the insurance isn't provided for illegal eBikes used by Deliveroo riders.

Illegal eBikes are classed as scooters / mopeds because of the power assistance and lack of cut out at 15.5mph.

The insurance Ts and Cs states:

"Riders using a car or scooter to complete deliveries will need to purchase their own vehicle insurance"

Avatar
Geordiepeddeler replied to open_roads | 3 days ago
1 like

They are not classed as scooters or mopeds at all!

Avatar
Shermo replied to Geordiepeddeler | 3 days ago
1 like
Geordiepeddeler wrote:

They are not classed as scooters or mopeds at all!

If it has a throttle it's a moped. If it has assist over 15mph or power over 250w then it is either an S-Pedelec or a moped, either of which need insurance and a number plate in the UK.

Nearly every example I see in Sheffield are using throttles so they're all mopeds without number plates and I assume without valid insurance.

Avatar
wtjs replied to Shermo | 2 days ago
1 like

Nearly every example I see in Sheffield are using throttles...

Also in Preston, where I was waiting right by the A6 (the main route north from Preston police HQ) 1/2 an hour for a bus a few nights ago. They're now moving in massed ranks on criminal forays out to leafy North Lancashire- here are 4 hiding their faces just like most of you are probably seeing every day and, of course, not pedalling. 3 are definitely illegal. The police could pick up loads of these every day, confiscate them, and reduce the problem rapidly- they just can't be bothered.

Avatar
thereverent | 4 days ago
2 likes

Not going to happen, and would be affective it it did.

Given how many police appeals there are giving the description of a car (as no-one caught the numberplate) identification is harder than people think. This would be even harder to see being on a jacket or bag.

The Police don't have the resource to enfoce the current road laws let alone this.

Avatar
Car Delenda Est | 4 days ago
6 likes

Zero chance of JE/Deliveroo doing that.
Following the HC with a pedal bike will earn you £6 an hour. The only way to turn a profit is to ignore the HC or for them to increase pay.

Avatar
LarryN | 4 days ago
1 like

It's about time, though as this is Scotland, England will lag behind. The behaviour of many delivery drivers is appalling. Often they wear gear from multiple providers, i.e. Deliveroo fleece, Just Eat box - you don't know who to complain to. Plus, faces hooded and under scarves.

Many of them work for major supermarkets, who seemingly can do nothing; I've complained the riders, who often don't understand English; how will they follow all our rules? In any case, legislation would not affect many other scallies and yobs, often up to no good. Imagine them doing 'national service'; mayhem!

Avatar
chrisonabike | 4 days ago
4 likes

Numbered tabards.  For when nothing else can tackle thorny issues like the consequences of not-employees-honest* being incentivised to get jobs done however, sometimes already using illegal vehicles, and the police/CPS/courts/DVLA etc. don't have resources and/or motivation to do same even with "licenced, insured drivers" of "MOT'd, taxed and registered" motor vehicles.

* Some of whom may be in the grey economy / have dubious rights to be doing the job anyway.  Or indeed be transporting less-than-legal takeaways... I'm going to bet that tabards aren't going to be an impediment to business as usual any more than cars needing numberplates are to those drivers engaged in illicit business.

Avatar
dubwise | 4 days ago
5 likes

I, for one, am against this. If they force this on those guys, then we will be next.

Avatar
open_roads | 4 days ago
10 likes

The police already have powers to stop and seize all illegal bikes. But they don't bother. 
 

making riders wear numbered vests would be more of the same - the police continuing to not be bothered.

Avatar
Shermo replied to open_roads | 4 days ago
3 likes

Don't need numbered vests, just number plates on their mopeds.

Avatar
Geordiepeddeler replied to Shermo | 4 days ago
1 like

Mopeds already have number plates.

Avatar
Hirsute replied to Geordiepeddeler | 4 days ago
5 likes

If you track their comments, they are saying the converted pushbikes meet the definition of a moped so are mopeds. However, such converted bikes do not have the required certificates or plates that a moped requires.

Avatar
Geordiepeddeler replied to Hirsute | 3 days ago
0 likes

I'm a professional bike mechanic and your wrong, sorry.

Avatar
OldRidgeback replied to Geordiepeddeler | 3 days ago
1 like

If the electric bikes have been converted with throttles instead of power assitance when pedalling and don't have a cut-out above 15mph, then they are mopeds legally. A lot of delivery riders use electric bikes that have been modified illegally this way. 

Avatar
chrisonabike replied to OldRidgeback | 3 days ago
1 like

Indeed.  Although I'm cautious on the numbers here.  I suspect most food delivery folks - at least in Edinburgh - are on roughly legal ones (most hire from one or two firms) - just because of cheaper hire cost / local cornering of the market.  Yes:
 - AFAIKS there's no pressure to stick to the rules from police or the delivery firms.  It may be that the non-legal ones are more pricey / you actually have to find cash to buy rather than (most common in Edinburgh) hiring.  And they may be more likely to get nicked.
 - Even if technically legal they're not necessarily terribly safe.  Certainly likely to be run very hard and at best indifferently maintained.  However the "back-alley modification" types seem to be in a minority around where I am.
 - Of course it's hard to say legally from a distance unless you're sure they're going way over 15.5mph AND they couldn't be doing that because on a hill / their rider is just coasting after a heroic effort...  Equally the really illegal ones stand out, flying past me uphill at about car-speed with no pedalling.

Anyway, enough rambling - for those interested / nerdy I think the current rules are here (please post if there is a better summary / these are out of date):

Electrically Assistent Pedal Cycle (EAPC - legal e-bike): https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/electrically-assisted-pedal-c...

I'm less sure on what legal mopeds are (of course some new things will be neither!) but here?  https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/62ed0f0e8fa8f5033275fcde/...

Avatar
Hirsute replied to Geordiepeddeler | 3 days ago
3 likes

The definition relates to power output and speed - any other vehicle of the L1e category that cannot be classified according to the criteria (9) to (12) of a L1e-A vehicle. Where (9) to (12) relate to assisted pedal bikes .

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/eur/2013/168

Instead of saying you are wrong, perhaps you could explain what your definition is.

Avatar
wycombewheeler replied to Geordiepeddeler | 3 days ago
2 likes

Geordiepeddeler wrote:

Mopeds already have number plates.

legal mopeds do, what about the backstreet conversion of a bicycle?

an e-bike complying with the rules is an ebike, but once the motor exceeds 250/15mph or works on a throttle with no peddling is it not a moped?

What if someone fits a petrol motor such as this https://www.amazon.co.uk/OUNUO-Bicycle-Motorized-Black-upgraded-version/... ? is that still not a moped?

Pretty sure the people doing these illegal conversions are not registering these for use on the roads and complying with motor vehicle regulations. so they will not be fitting plates.

Avatar
IanMK replied to open_roads | 4 days ago
2 likes

I'm not sure that it's entirely the fault of the police. If we still had VOSA then I think we could have had joint operations. It's now the DVSA, and I'm not sure what they do.
As others have said, we need political will that wants to regulate and to police those regulations.

Avatar
wtjs replied to IanMK | 4 days ago
4 likes

It's now the DVSA, and I'm not sure what they do

DVSA, at least for my purposes, seems pretty good and efficient. It's DVLA that seems to be the dumping ground for hopeless, idle duffers. They're the people who are so determined to not find out about VED evasion that they don't provide a facility to upload GPS timed photos of very long term evaders, and the online form they provide is designed for them to be able to whimper 'but we couldn't find the vehicle'. I have reported this one to the police and DVLA several times, all to no avail. It had no MOT for 6 years as well, ran around for many months with a failed MOT (serious safety defects) and then got an MOT (I suspect this was for insurance reasons related to use of the vehicle for his 'groundworks' business)- so the DVLA's own database would quickly list all the vehicles with recent MOT but no VED/ SORN. Yet they still continue doing nothing

Avatar
quiff replied to wtjs | 4 days ago
0 likes

While I have no doubt that you could accurately locate most of the unMOT/VEDd cars in Lancashire for them, I can understand why it might be impractical for DVLA to respond to individual reports. I have however seen evidence of DVLA targeting particular areas and clamping all the wrong-uns en masse - but I guess this is far easier / only practicable in urban areas where there is greater density of parked cars.     

Avatar
wtjs replied to quiff | 3 days ago
1 like

 I can understand why it might be impractical for DVLA to respond to individual reports

They could sub-contract to The Filth! That one is often parked 150 yards from Garstang Police Station, and there is a Facebook page as well as the phone numbers. However, police wouldn't act even when it was over 5 years without MOT and several months after failed MOT.

Avatar
Andrewbanshee | 4 days ago
9 likes

I requested feedback on a headcam submission of a close pass at speed. 3 weeks after the event. The response was that they are still trying to identify the owner. So numberplate are really effective then.

Avatar
dubwise replied to Andrewbanshee | 4 days ago
3 likes

You couldn't make this up, either false plates or a friend of a police officer.

Pages

Latest Comments