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'Bike storming' and skateboarding youths welcome in City of London, suggests new police report responding to anti-social behaviour complaints

Far from cracking down on youths cycling and skating in the Square Mile, the report says that the City "is a safer place to spend time in comparison to other London boroughs", and suggests more longer term solutions...

A police response to anti-social behaviour complaints about youths 'bike storming' and skating in London's Square Mile has played down the issue, concluding that the number of reports are low, and that the City is a safer place for youths to take part in their hobbies in a relatively safe environment. 

In the report, under the subject 'Responses to Anti-Social Behaviour in the City of London', points 20 through to 27 refer to Skateboarding and ‘Bike Storming’. It says the City of London Corporation and City Police have been working closely to 'proportionately respond' to reports of anti-social behaviour with regards to bike storming and skateboarding; however, it says the number of reports are low: 

"Several options have been explored by partners to holistically mitigate the issue", says the report. "However, many of proposed solutions have been compounded by data from the City Police, which indicates that the actual number of reports to the Police regarding ASB [anti-social behaviour] and such activities is very low.

"Additionally, if there is ASB displayed with the skateboarding and cycling activities the age range of many of those 5 participating in those activities limit the use of low-level ASB enforcement powers, such as Community Protection Warnings and Notices and subsequently displacing the issue."

Long-term solutions are suggested to allow youths to cycle and skate in a specific area of the City "to avoid noise complaints"; a skate park in the Square Mile is one of the options being explored. 

The report concludes: "We are exploring which are the most effective options to address this issue and aim to provide the best possible outcome for both residents and young people.

"We know young people come to the City for a number of reasons and one of them is that the City is a safer place to spend time in comparison to other London boroughs. As such, children and young people can visit the City to play with a significantly reduced risk of becoming involved in serious criminal activities, both as victims and perpetrators. Rather, they can spend their time taking part in an active hobby which promotes exercise, with many of them considering it a sport."

The response was shared numerous times on social media, with @lastnotlost commenting: "The City provides a safe environment to burn off energy." 

Paul Allen added: "Whenever I see Bike Stormz I find it heart warming rather than threatening. A lovely response from the authorities." 

'Bike storming' commonly refers to cyclists, often youths, riding bmx and mountain bikes in a large group together. As we've previously reported, the official 'BikeStormz' events are described as "the biggest underground youth movement in the UK" by its creators, with the video above recorded at the 2020 edition. Launched in 2015, the defining message is ‘Knives Down, Bikes Up’, and organisers say they want to turn the riding style – one-handed wheelies, skids and numerous others tricks performed in motion – into a sport in its own right. 

BikeStormz 2021 is set to take place on 10th July, and those interested in joining can register on the BikeStormz website. Under 18's must have parental consent to participate. 

Arriving at road.cc in 2017 via 220 Triathlon Magazine, Jack dipped his toe in most jobs on the site and over at eBikeTips before being named the new editor of road.cc in 2020, much to his surprise. His cycling life began during his students days, when he cobbled together a few hundred quid off the back of a hard winter selling hats (long story) and bought his first road bike - a Trek 1.1 that was quickly relegated to winter steed, before it was sadly pinched a few years later. Creatively replacing it with a Trek 1.2, Jack mostly rides this bike around local cycle paths nowadays, but when he wants to get the racer out and be competitive his preferred events are time trials, sportives, triathlons and pogo sticking - the latter being another long story.  

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44 comments

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to Gus T | 2 years ago
2 likes

Don't forget all the air pollutants and the participants not getting exercise.

Avatar
JUD KIRK replied to Gus T | 2 years ago
1 like

Is either desirable?

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Sriracha replied to Gus T | 2 years ago
0 likes
Gus T wrote:

Apples and oranges

and yet the parallels are so clearly drawn in AidanR's line of reasoning.

Avatar
AidanR replied to Sriracha | 2 years ago
1 like
Sriracha wrote:
Gus T wrote:

Apples and oranges

and yet the parallels are so clearly drawn in AidanR's line of reasoning.

An analogy is an argument from one particular to another particular. It does not say that they are alike in all ways.

In any event, I did not say that we should encourage such things. I could have also drawn the analogy that one man murdering his wife doesn't mean that all husbands are tarnished by that man's actions. Would you also suggest that I'm encouraging men to murder their wives?

Avatar
Sriracha replied to AidanR | 2 years ago
0 likes
AidanR wrote:
Sriracha wrote:
Gus T wrote:

Apples and oranges

and yet the parallels are so clearly drawn in AidanR's line of reasoning.

An analogy is an argument from one particular to another particular. It does not say that they are alike in all ways.

In any event, I did not say that we should encourage such things. I could have also drawn the analogy that one man murdering his wife doesn't mean that all husbands are tarnished by that man's actions. Would you also suggest that I'm encouraging men to murder their wives?

Thanks for removing the ambiguity - for clearly we are not expected to condone nor encourage the activities of murderous husbands.

In each of your three parallel scenarios you argue that the activities of the subject group being deplorable need not reflect on the reputation of the majority.

This only makes sense in so far as we do find the activities of the subject group deplorable, else where is the risk to reputation?

The three parallel examples you give, hoodlums in cars, murderous husbands, and Stormz cyclists.

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to Sriracha | 2 years ago
3 likes
Sriracha wrote:
AidanR wrote:

An analogy is an argument from one particular to another particular. It does not say that they are alike in all ways. In any event, I did not say that we should encourage such things. I could have also drawn the analogy that one man murdering his wife doesn't mean that all husbands are tarnished by that man's actions. Would you also suggest that I'm encouraging men to murder their wives?

Thanks for removing the ambiguity - for clearly we are not expected to condone nor encourage the activities of murderous husbands.

Now you tell me!

Anyone have any good tips for removing blood from carpets?

Avatar
AidanR replied to Sriracha | 2 years ago
0 likes
Sriracha wrote:

Thanks for removing the ambiguity - for clearly we are not expected to condone nor encourage the activities of murderous husbands.

In each of your three parallel scenarios you argue that the activities of the subject group being deplorable need not reflect on the reputation of the majority.

This only makes sense in so far as we do find the activities of the subject group deplorable, else where is the risk to reputation?

The three parallel examples you give, hoodlums in cars, murderous husbands, and Stormz cyclists.

The original point was about motorists having a negative view of all cyclists because of the atypical actions of a small subset.

I'm sure that some motorists do find it deplorable - we all know that there are plenty of angry drivers out there. That doesn't mean that everyone finds Stormz cyclists deplorable.

Neither does the analogy stretch from deplorable to dangerous - it is specific to (some) people's perceptions, not to actual threat posed.

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Captain Badger replied to Richard Tillotson | 2 years ago
0 likes
Richard Tillotson wrote:

What kind of reaction......an accident, calling them out and getting mobbed for doing so, damaging other peoples property, negative attention whilst trying to gain some kind of recognition for performing a wheelie towards oncoming traffic?

I am all for pushing your abilities in your chosen field but the need to get in peoples faces to do so is unnecessary.  There is intimidation and that is why most people won't intervene.

We as cyclists are often lambasted for not having insurance or having total disregard for other road users and this behaviour is a complete step backwards.  Do it in an area that doesn't involve other road users.

Don't tell I tell 'e, Richard.....

It's annoying, along with all manner of behaviour that emanates from the yoof of today (and yesterday. 'xcept my generation. We had respect).

Only, what realistically can be done, that is proportionate to the annoyance?

 

 

Avatar
SaintClarence27 replied to Richard Tillotson | 2 years ago
1 like
Richard Tillotson wrote:

What kind of reaction......an accident, calling them out and getting mobbed for doing so, damaging other peoples property, negative attention whilst trying to gain some kind of recognition for performing a wheelie towards oncoming traffic?

I am all for pushing your abilities in your chosen field but the need to get in peoples faces to do so is unnecessary.  There is intimidation and that is why most people won't intervene.

We as cyclists are often lambasted for not having insurance or having total disregard for other road users and this behaviour is a complete step backwards.  Do it in an area that doesn't involve other road users.

The idea that we could get teenagers to stop acting like assholes is ludicrous.  Cycling has nothing to do with it.

Avatar
ktache | 2 years ago
19 likes

Kids on bikes, showing off skills.

What's not to like.

Well done City of London police.

And Knives down, Bikes up is never a bad message...

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I love my bike replied to ktache | 2 years ago
8 likes

But I'm a Cabby & dun <sic> the knowledge; it's my street. Now even the ol bill are against us!

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Captain Badger replied to I love my bike | 2 years ago
11 likes
I love my bike wrote:

But I'm a Cabby & dun <sic> the knowledge; it's my street. Now even the ol bill are against us!

You forgot road tax! Tell em about road tax!

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I love my bike replied to Captain Badger | 2 years ago
2 likes

I'm such a poor driver that I can't afford an electric one & not pay the tax, like those swarmin scoundrels!

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hawkinspeter | 2 years ago
7 likes

Noice!
 

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