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review

Schwalbe One 365 Folding Bike Tyre

8
£51.99

VERDICT:

8
10
Quick, compliant and seemingly dependable training tyre for most conditions
Quick
Handle well in most contexts
Generally compliant ride quality
Good puncture resistance
Weight limit might not suit some
Weight: 
332g

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The Schwalbe One 365 is marketed as a tyre for all seasons – a big boast, not to mention a big ask given the conditions that can present and the bases it must cover. Aside from grip, durability, and ride quality, an all-seasons tyre should also be able to resist flats. I'm pleased to report Schwalbe has largely aced the brief. Some minor limitations became apparent on wet, muddy lanes, but no worse than experienced with other four-seasons middleweight rubber.

For more options for riding faster and further with fewer punctures, check out our guide to the best road bike tyres.

The One 365 replaces Schwalbe's training and commuting tyre, the Durano DD, and for the most part its specification is what I'd expect for this genre of training/winter rubber: a 67tpi casing suggesting a hardwearing carcass, and Schwalbe's Addix 4-Season compound.

Beneath the casing, Schwalbe's RaceGuard puncture-repelling technology covers the centre strip and comprises a two-layer nylon fabric. It's not as dependable as belts running bead to bead, but theoretically defends against flats without adding undue weight or a stodgy ride.

Their sidewalls also feature subtle retro-reflective detailing for night-time safety, and work well enough.

2024 Schwalbe One 365 Folding Bike Tyre.jpg

Schwalbe cites a recommended load of 70kg apiece. On paper at least, this might suggest 140kg – plenty of scope for bigger riders and lightweight touring – though Schwalbe actually suggests a maximum of 116kg spread across both tyres is the safest bet.

The tyres also have an E-25 rating for e-bikes, which broadly speaking means leisurely commutes or recreational rides on smooth surfaces.

Fitting

I managed to mount our 28mm tyres with a single lever, and that was only necessary when coaxing the final stubborn 20% home.

In use

From the outset, I was struck by their speed and relative compliance – even at their maximum (115psi) they never felt harsh or skittish. Judicious experimentation suggested between 100 and 105psi was the best fit for me – plenty of go while taking the sting out of washboard tarmac and cornering dependably, particularly in the wet.

Training rubber has come a long way in recent years, in my experience, and though these are by no means a race tyre, they're quick off the mark – when snatching away at the lights or suddenly meeting a sharp incline, for instance.

2024 Schwalbe one 365  in situ roadcc.JPG

On waterlogged roads they held their line well, positively leach-like at 105psi around some notoriously greasy S-bends, and I also pushed them to 28mph on some very wet descents.

On a few very cold, icy mornings I was relieved to find they bit impeccably – no pregnant pauses. Dropping the pressure to 90 boosted psychological reassurance without any discernible impact upon rolling resistance. (For context, I'd experienced a momentary loss of traction along the same stretch with a beefy 32mm commuter model run at 70psi.)

They've been ultra dependable at roundabouts and easily flicked around the usual hazards. As with any tyre, a bit of caution is called for across wet ironwork, especially when the temperature has hit zero, but the One 365s have supplied reliable feedback.

The wrong type of mud...

While their performance on wet, slippery stuff has generally been excellent, I did notice some loss of traction along a few freshly muddied roads when persistent rain was thrown into the mix. But thanks to the tyres' reliable feedback I never went rubber up, even when running them at the higher pressures, and their loss of traction wasn't any worse than I've experienced with Maxxis Re-Fuse or Vittoria Rubino Pro Graphene 2.0 tyres. Nonetheless, burlier, 700g+ fare such as Kenda's Kwick Journey KS Plus have more bite and a definite edge in these conditions.

Puncture resistance & durability

The nigh-on slick tread helps prevent flints and similar nasties lodging and working their way inside, and while puncture-repelling prowess can fade with use, 450 miles in and I've had zero flats – reassuring given I've ridden through a fair bit of slimy stuff while farmers have been pruning hedges – though whether this will be the case 1,800 miles down the line is difficult to say. (I'd gone 2,500 miles on some Maxxis Re-Fuses before they started succumbing.)

> Puncture prevention 101: learn how to swerve flats with these 11 top tricks

I ran Schwalbe's Marathon GT 365 – admittedly a completely different genre of tyre – for several years puncture free, though even that succumbed to a flint that cut through the casing and belt.

Anyway, so far so good, and there's no sign of premature wear, no nicks or cuts in the One 365s' casings – and I've resisted my default temptation to brush the casings down between rides or after blasting through a medley of small sharps.

Value

While £51.99 apiece is hardly cheap, there are pricier options out there.

Pirelli's Cinturato road tyres have bead-to-bead puncture protection boosted by a nylon breaker. Stu had positive experiences with the Cinturato Velo TLR Reflective, although found them a little tricky to fit. They're £66.99 each.

Goodyear's Vector 4Seasons feature reinforced sidewalls and a bead-to-bead puncture-repelling belt, and Michelin's Power All Season is another model reckoned to offer good grip in all conditions, with an aramid puncture-repelling belt that claims to offer greater protection to the shoulder area. Both are around £8 more than the Schwalbe.

Continental's Grand Prix 4 Season is also more – £65.95 – though Continental does make much of the puncture and cut-repelling properties: "A double Vectran™ Breaker belt under the tread raises the puncture and cut protection to the highest level available on the market. Featuring a total of five plies beneath the tread, plus a sixth Duraskin layer." And if you want tubeless ready, its Grand Prix 5000 AS TR is £84.95...

The One 365s also out-do cheaper options in my experience on performance and durability.

The Maxxis Re-Fuse tyres I've mentioned are £37.99. The 32mm models are 408g apiece, but their ride quality, at least when running butyl tubes, is less compliant than the Schwalbes.

Vittoria's Rubino Pro Graphene 2.0 is another model pitched at four-season duties, employing a graphene part supposedly improving longevity. They're £44.99 each, but I've found their ride quality a little less supple than the Schwalbes, and though they're generally resistant to flats, their puncture resistance waned with use.

Conclusion

Overall, I've been impressed by the Schwalbe One 365's blend of speed, agility and comfort. Their puncture resistance and general reliability have inspired confidence, and whether this will wane with mileage is yet to be seen.

Verdict

Quick, compliant and seemingly dependable training tyre for most conditions

road.cc test report

Make and model: Schwalbe One 365 Folding Bike Tyre

Size tested: 28-622 700x28

Tell us what the product is for and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Schwalbe says:

"The all-season road bike tire

Replaces training and commuting tire Durano DD

Newly developed with even more focus on riding dynamics and safety in all seasons

Reinforced carcass provides greater puncture protection

High-quality Addix 4-Season compound:

Plenty of grip even at low temperatures, good rolling resistance at all temperatures

Black reflective strip as a visual highlight and for additional safety in road traffic

Attention does not conform to ECE-R88 regulation

New wide sizes"

It's a reliable lightweight training tyre with scope for lightweight/weekend touring.

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the product?

From Schwalbe:

Size: ETRTO 28-622

Type: Folding

Compound: Addix 4season

Version: RaceGuard

Seal: Tube

Weight: 320 g

Pressure: 6.0-8.0 Bar (85-115 psi)

Maximum load: 70 kg

Rate the product for quality of construction:
 
8/10

Seem very solid, especially given the weight.

Rate the product for performance:
 
8/10

Impressive across the board, although I experienced some minor loss of traction along unexpectedly muddy lanes.

Rate the product for durability:
 
7/10

No punctures, cuts, or similar damage over the test period.

Rate the product for weight (if applicable)
 
8/10

Seem more dependable than weight might suggest.

Rate the product for comfort (if applicable)
 
8/10

Ride quality is surprisingly compliant, even at the higher end of the pressure range.

Rate the product for value:
 
6/10

£52 is hardly cheap but performance across the board has impressed me. There are pricier, too.

Tell us how the product performed overall when used for its designed purpose

They tyres have impressed me with their balance of agility, speed, compliance, and reliability. Wet and generally slippery conditions have defined the test period and aside from some Paris-Roubaix type mud, they've inspired complete confidence. No cuts or similar damage, and no punctures to date. Whether that will wane over time remains to be seen, especially in the context of the puncture-repelling belt, which only runs along the centre not bead to bead.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the product

Engaging, compliant ride, seemingly without trade-off in terms of puncture resistance.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the product

Nothing stands out, especially given their intended purpose.

How does the price compare to that of similar products in the market, including ones recently tested on road.cc?

While £51.99 apiece is hardly cheap, there are pricier options out there: Pirelli's Cinturato road tyres have bead-to-bead puncture protection boosted by a nylon breaker. Stu had positive experiences with the Cinturato Velo TLR Reflective, although found them a little tricky to fit. They're £66.99 each.

Goodyear's Vector 4Seasons feature reinforced sidewalls and a bead-to-bead puncture-repelling belt, and Michelin's Power All Season is another model reckoned to offer good grip in all conditions, with an aramid puncture-repelling belt that claims to offer greater protection to the shoulder area. Both are around £8 more than the Schwalbes.

Continental's Grand Prix 4 Season is also more – £65.95 – and if you want tubeless ready, its Grand Prix 5000 AS TR is £84.95...

The One 365s also out-do cheaper options in my experience on performance and durability. The Maxxis Re-Fuse tyres I mention in the review are £37.99 (size 32mm, 408g), but their ride quality, at least when running butyl tubes, is more direct than the Schwalbes.

Vittoria's Rubino Pro Graphene 2.0 is another model pitched at four-season duties, employing a graphene part supposedly improving longevity. They're £44.99 each, but I've found their ride quality a little less supple than the Schwalbes, and though they're generally resistant to flats, their puncture resistance waned with use.

Did you enjoy using the product? Yes

Would you consider buying the product? Yes

Would you recommend the product to a friend? Certainly worth a look.

Use this box to explain your overall score

They're very good: quick, yet seemingly dependable tyres for training or faster winter riding, though the weight limit may not suit everyone.

Overall rating: 8/10

About the tester

Age: 50  Height: 1m 81cm  Weight: 70kg

I usually ride: Rough Stuff Tourer Based around 4130 Univega mtb Frameset  My best bike is: 1955 Holdsworth Road Path and several others including cross & traditional road

I've been riding for: Over 20 years  I ride: Most days  I would class myself as: Experienced

I regularly do the following types of riding: cyclo cross, commuting, touring, fixed/singlespeed, mtb,

Shaun Audane is a freelance writer/product tester with over twenty-eight years riding experience, the last twelve (120,000 miles) spent putting bikes and kit through their paces for a variety of publications. Previous generations of his family worked at manufacturing's sharp end, thus Shaun can weld, has a sound understanding of frame building practice and a preference for steel or titanium framesets.
Citing Richard Ballantine and an Au pair as his earliest cycling influences, he is presently writing a cycling book with particular focus upon women, families and disabled audiences (Having been a registered care manager and coached children at Herne Hill Velodrome in earlier careers)

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1 comments

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Simon E | 2 weeks ago
1 like

The Durano DD has become my staple year-round, high mileage commuting tyre. It's not the most supple or smooth rolling tyre, probably due to the stiff sidewalls, though it isn't quite in the same league as the Durano Plus (replaced by the One Plus). While the puncture belt below the tread isn't as substantial or effective as the Plus it is certainly more robust than the standard Durano (now named One Addix, or something. Naming every road tyre as One something isn't very clear).

The One 365 is available in 32mm while the widest DD is 28mm.

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