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“World’s strongest folding lock” smashes Kickstarter funding target within 24 hours

Seatylock’s Foldylock Forever has a Sold Secure Bicycle Gold rating and has nearly hit 500% of its target

Seatylock’s Foldylock Forever – which it describes as the “world’s strongest folding lock” – has smashed its Kickstarter funding target within a day. The Foldylock Forever comes with a Sold Secure Bicycle Gold rating and deliveries are expected in July 2022. 

2022 Seatylock Foldylock Forever - 2.jpeg

The fact that it already has a Sold Secure rating indicates that the Foldylock Forever is a completed product. It looks like Seatylock is using Kickstarter as a retail platform rather than as a means of securing investment to develop the product. 

2022 Seatylock Foldylock Forever - 4.jpeg

Foldylock Forever is made up of six 6.5mm thick hardened steel plates that are covered in UV-treated polymer to protect the metal and prevent any scratches to your bike frame. It has a circumference of 90cm but folds down to 25cm x 4.7cm x 6.9cm and sits inside a mounting case that you can fit onto your bike’s bottle cage bosses. Seatylock reckons that the Foldylock Forever doesn’t rattle when being carried.

2022 Seatylock Foldylock Forever - 3.jpeg

Seatylock also says that the Foldylock Forever stands up to bolt cutters and features stainless steel rivets protected against drilling, sawing and cutting. The cylinder mechanism is designed to be smooth and secure. The lock has a claimed weight of 1.76kg and comes with a three-year warranty.

“The Foldylock Forever is the strongest folding lock ever made,” says Seatylock. “It stood up to the Sold Secure Gold international standard lab test and is rated 18/18 on our security scale. It features extra-thick link bars to withstand one metre bolt cutter and aggressive crowbar twist attacks. Its extra-thick rivets are patent protected against the notorious side attack, and its automotive standard locking mechanism cannot be pried or picked.”

2022 Seatylock Foldylock Forever - 6.jpeg

After only one day, the project has already achieved nearly 500% of its admittedly modest funding target (£8,109).

A Super Early Bird offer is still available for a few hours (at the time of writing), where you’re in line to receive a Seatylock Foldylock Forever if you pledge US$78 (about £64), compared with a retail price of US$120 (about £97). Once that expires, there are various other rewards for pledges.

As ever with Kickstarter, rewards aren’t guaranteed. It’s not like purchasing in a shop. Here are the Kickstarter rules

Get more details over at Kickstarter or visit Seatylock’s website

Mat has been in cycling media since 1996, on titles including BikeRadar, Total Bike, Total Mountain Bike, What Mountain Bike and Mountain Biking UK, and he has been editor of 220 Triathlon and Cycling Plus. Mat has been road.cc technical editor for over a decade, testing bikes, fettling the latest kit, and trying out the most up-to-the-minute clothing. We send him off around the world to get all the news from launches and shows too. He has won his category in Ironman UK 70.3 and finished on the podium in both marathons he has run. Mat is a Cambridge graduate who did a post-grad in magazine journalism, and he is a winner of the Cycling Media Award for Specialist Online Writer. Now over 50, he's riding road and gravel bikes most days for fun and fitness rather than training for competitions.

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31 comments

Avatar
NOtotheEU | 1 year ago
3 likes

I'm guessing that a lock good enough to beat any attack would unfortunately be too expensive to buy and too heavy to carry. 

Avatar
Eton Rifle | 1 year ago
0 likes

I've had a foldylock for a while. It seems to be an OK lock but what attracted me to it was the ease of storage on the frame. It turns out that you actually need a pretty big triangle to have sufficient clearance to get the folded lock in and out of the holster.

It's now languishing at the back of the garage.

Avatar
hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
3 likes

The question is whether this lock can withstand a nut-splitter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zs8uyPsDaw0

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wtjs replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
2 likes

The question is whether this lock can withstand a nut-splitter

Excellent research! I think the average crim will still go for the convenience and relative certainty of the grinder

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nosferatu1001 replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
1 like

That wasn't what first came to mind when I saw the term "nut splitter"...

https://youtu.be/ftVNmFUtIyI

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andystow replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
2 likes

I suspect that's what's meant by "Its extra-thick rivets are patent protected against the notorious side attack..."

I'll believe it when LPL tries and fails.

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hawkinspeter replied to andystow | 1 year ago
1 like

This lock is a lot smaller, cheaper and lighter than the ABUS that he was able to bust, so I doubt that it'll be any better

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Sriracha replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
2 likes

I wonder, if the hardened washer was set into rebates in the links, that ought to stop the entry of the tooth/wedge of the nut splitter?

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ktache replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
1 like

The automotive standard unpickable locking mechanism seems like a challenge?

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hawkinspeter replied to ktache | 1 year ago
0 likes
ktache wrote:

The automotive standard unpickable locking mechanism seems like a challenge?

I don't believe that unpickable is true, and I've seen LPL picking a car lock without too much difficulty. It's a vague statement as some car locks are laughable and can be opened with a screwdriver, whereas some are quite decent.

Avatar
Eton Rifle replied to andystow | 1 year ago
3 likes
andystow wrote:

I suspect that's what's meant by "Its extra-thick rivets are patent protected against the notorious side attack..."

I'll believe it when LPL tries and fails.

Lock picking Lawyer is purely for entertainment purposes.

No chav bike tea leaf is going to go to the trouble of learning technical lockpicking skills when they can pick up a battery-powered angle grinder for a few quid in Aldi.

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chrisonabike replied to Eton Rifle | 1 year ago
2 likes

True but I would say the LPL is not just entertainment - always worth a search before buying as he's:
a) corrected total BS about physical security from some lock makers.  Security is always a trade off but some bike lock makers have ridiculously oversold their product - he's shown some are definitely in the "kid could open this with tools from Wilko" category.
b) shown some locks can be very simply bypassed or just really want to open.  Sort of "child stuck a paperclip (or twig) in it".  I think it's realistic to expect that level of security might just be tested on the street.  Some well known brand not-entry-level locks have been shown to fail here.

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brooksby replied to hawkinspeter | 1 year ago
2 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:

The question is whether this lock can withstand a nut-splitter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zs8uyPsDaw0

Is that a squirrel thing?

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to brooksby | 1 year ago
2 likes
brooksby wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:

The question is whether this lock can withstand a nut-splitter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zs8uyPsDaw0

Is that a squirrel thing?

Maybe

Avatar
andystow | 1 year ago
3 likes

"...automotive standard locking mechanism cannot be pried or picked."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8fbxN3Z5e8

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Secret_squirrel | 1 year ago
3 likes

What about to a battery powered grinder?  

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Boopop replied to Secret_squirrel | 1 year ago
2 likes

What about a battery powered angle grinder? Good luck finding a lock that can stand up to one.

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Sriracha replied to Boopop | 1 year ago
2 likes
Boopop wrote:

What about a battery powered angle grinder? Good luck finding a lock that can stand up to one.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/airlok/hiplok-d1000-anti-angle-grin...

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Boopop replied to Sriracha | 1 year ago
1 like
Sriracha wrote:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/airlok/hiplok-d1000-anti-angle-grin...

That's some nice advertising from Hiplok. It's still not angle-grinder proof. Resistant, sure, but it won't stop a determined thief. Whether your average angle grinder opportunist would go to this much effort is another matter, but I stand by my original point that you'd be hard pressed to find a lock that is angle-gridner proof.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dk6XGv29RRI

Skip to about 6:15

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Hirsute replied to Boopop | 1 year ago
0 likes

The angle grinder with a mains cable?

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Secret_squirrel replied to Boopop | 1 year ago
1 like
Boopop wrote:

I stand by Secret_Squirrel's original point that you'd be hard pressed to find a lock that is angle-grinder proof.

FTFY.  Also corrected gridner to grinder.  If you're gonna be a smart arse at least do it well.

Avatar
Boopop replied to Secret_squirrel | 1 year ago
1 like
Secret_squirrel wrote:
Boopop wrote:

I stand by Secret_Squirrel's original point that you'd be hard pressed to find a lock that is angle-grinder proof.

FTFY.  Also corrected gridner to grinder.  If you're gonna be a smart arse at least do it well.

Wasn't expecting someone to be mean on here, feels like I'm on twitter all of a sudden. I wasn't trying to be a "smart arse", just pointing out that no lock is going to prevent theft by angle grinder given enough effort.

"What about to a battery powered grinder?" doesn't seem like a particularly grammatically correct question if we're going to go down that route ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

Avatar
Sriracha replied to Boopop | 1 year ago
2 likes
Boopop wrote:

but I stand by my original point that you'd be hard pressed to find a lock that is angle-gridner proof.

actually your original point was "Good luck finding a lock that can stand up to one [an angle grinder]". And by all accounts the Hiplock does exactly that. It takes several replacement discs.

Avatar
Boopop replied to Sriracha | 1 year ago
1 like
Sriracha wrote:
Boopop wrote:

but I stand by my original point that you'd be hard pressed to find a lock that is angle-gridner proof.

actually your original point was "Good luck finding a lock that can stand up to one [an angle grinder]". And by all accounts the Hiplock does exactly that. It takes several replacement discs.

I suppose we have differing definitions of "stand up to". I meant "proof" to begin with, sorry if I wasn't clear the first time round. If my bike gets stolen because someone used an angle grinder, I don't really care how many discs it takes them. Clearly if it takes several discs that's a good thing, but Hiplok market it as "that can withstand severe, sustained angle grinder attack.".

Withstand your average angle grinder attack? Sure. A sustained and severe angle grinder attack? Clearly not.

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chrisonabike replied to Boopop | 1 year ago
1 like

Dunno about the Hiplock but this might just cut it because they can't:

Altor SAF lock: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixPFDFp8Cfo

Slight issue is that you won't be taking this with you anywhere!

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mdavidford replied to chrisonabike | 1 year ago
2 likes
Quote:

I only know of one person in the world [who has a tool that could pick this] ... and that's of course Matt Smith in the UK

Presumably with his sonic screwdriver?

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Eton Rifle replied to Boopop | 1 year ago
4 likes

Being a hit pedantic, aren't you? Is even the thickest tea leaf going to stand there, changing discs and hacking away for minutes at a time? I suspect most of them don't even know that you can change the discs.

This looks really good.

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Steve K replied to Eton Rifle | 1 year ago
1 like
Eton Rifle wrote:

Being a hit pedantic, aren't you? Is even the thickest tea leaf going to stand there, changing discs and hacking away for minutes at a time? I suspect most of them don't even know that you can change the discs. This looks really good.

I am now the proud owner of a D1000.  No-one has tried to break it yet, so it's not been tested.  One thing I would say, though, is it's bloody heavy.

Avatar
Boopop replied to Eton Rifle | 1 year ago
0 likes
Eton Rifle wrote:

Being a hit pedantic, aren't you? Is even the thickest tea leaf going to stand there, changing discs and hacking away for minutes at a time? I suspect most of them don't even know that you can change the discs. This looks really good.

Hardly, I just don't like misleading advertising.

Avatar
Tinbob49 | 1 year ago
1 like

Sold secure has a diamond rating now

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