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Brilliant ride today on my adapted Superfly 29er, classic 'gravel' terrain, exploring coastal landrover tracks, cycle paths, canal towpaths, farm tracks, even some proper CX along the verge of a field.

Bike felt brilliant, lightweight CX tyres and latex tubes felt fast but also invincible on stoney tracks, and 100mm suspension forks took the edge off bigger puddles etc. Bike basically galloped everywhere and made me feel like some Flandrian hero (at 25km/h average, lol!).

The only fly in the ointment was the disc brakes. New Shimano Deores on XT rotors, with resin pads. Painstakingly bedded in and working perfectly in the dry. Problem is with the sort of riding I was doing, in constant rain, was that the brakes rarely got used, and never got hot, certainly never dried out. Result? Squeeling and howling every time I tried to slow down slightly for dog walkers/narrow sections etc. Must have almost given at least three people heart attacks along the way.

And for what? A marginal increase in power which seemed slightly redundant on 'gravel' terrain.

I wouldn't mind so much but my old winter commuter with posh mini-vs and decent pads brakes about 95% as well with none of the noise. In fact, because there's no squeeling I can brake harder without deafening myself or others.

Anyone else in the same boat? Feels like if manufacturers had bothered speccing bikes with decent rim brakes in the first place thete wouldn't be this mass migration to discs, and we'd all be enjoying lighter, cheaper bikes with only very slightly worse braking than we currently have.

Anyway, rant over, will just persevere trying to convert my rim braked singlespeed commuter into my perfect gravel bike...

30 comments

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hawkinspeter [3616 posts] 2 months ago
1 like

Yeah, I've got a similar issue on my road (not-CX) bike. Mine's Ultegra with metal pads and they're so loud when they get wet. I assumed that it's to do with my pads/discs being dirty as I don't take special care of them when I'm using a bucket of car shampoo to wash my bike.

I get embarrassed if I'm needing to slow down behind pedestrians and it sounds like I'm using a horn, so I try to keep the discs dry with gentle braking as I'm riding on the roads.

I was considering changing to resin pads when I next replace the pads, but maybe that's not worthwhile if you've got a similar problem with them.

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Jack Osbourne snr [780 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

Resin pads can be quieter, but they can also demonstrate the longevity of a bar of soap in the wet. I switched to sintered pads after dissolving a set of resin pads in a week of wet commuting. I was using Avid Elixirs at the time.

I tend to pulse the brakes if I have time eg approaching dog walkers... A couple of gentle squeezes to clear the water and then apply the brakes as required to actually slow.

Can't claim it works either perfectly or all the time, but it knocks a good few octaves and decibels off.

I've been commuting on discs for the best part of 10 years so I'm used to the noise now. I find the best way to reconcile it is that I know I'd have had to replace 3 or 4 pairs of rims in the same period. Sintered pads from discobrakes are much cheaper and quicker to replace than rebuilding wheels every couple of years.

 

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longassballs [138 posts] 2 months ago
1 like

It's not the increased power or reliability of disc brakes over rim that has made manufacturers switch but the byproducts of simplified frame and wheel design.

Carbon clinchers are inherently an unsafe design due to rim failure caused by excessive heat build up from the brake track. Taking away that brake track allows rims to be less complicated, use less material, and decrease manufacturing tolerances which in turn means less warranty replacements and possible lawsuits? It's just a safer and cheaper design. I dunno if wheel manufacturer reputation is worth more to them than the money lost from losing sales due to the lack of worn out rim wheel replacements.

It also makes it easier (cheaper?) to produce frames with bigger clearances that get rid of complications like chain and seat bridges, and reduce the fork crown. I'm sure there's some element of getting the consumer to buy another bike but there are definitely sound reasons why you're not being ripped off. The next thing will probably be overall disc brake bike packages that are as light as former rim brake models.

It'll also be cheaper to produce only one model of frame, wheel & components which is why they'll all but kill off rim brakes.

But yeah, they're noisey.

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Plasterer's Radio [528 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

Metathesiaphobia.

Bed them in properly, quick clean now & again, and they are fine.

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IanEdward [295 posts] 2 months ago
1 like
Quote:

Metathesiaphobia

Nope, but kudos for googling a clever word to be dismissive with smiley

Quote:

Bed them in properly, quick clean now & again, and they are fine.

The usual advice, but they're as well bedded in and as well looked after as a set of brakes could hope for. Anyway, I thought disc brakes were supposed to be low maintenance? 

 

 

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mike the bike [1204 posts] 2 months ago
2 likes
IanEdward wrote:

...... The usual advice, but they're as well bedded in and as well looked after as a set of brakes could hope for. Anyway, I thought disc brakes were supposed to be low maintenance? 

 

Mine are.  In fact they are as near as dammit no maintenance.  And, although I've used discs from four of the major manufacturers, I've never suffered from noise.  Not once, wet or dry.  And I've tried, really tried.  Although I sometimes spend excessive amounts on genuine replacement pads, I've often bought the cheapest too, but still my brakes are silent.

 What is the secret?  Well, I could be wrong, but I think it's to do with aligning the pads parallel to, and equidistant from, the disc.  That way there's no vibration when you press the lever and consequently, no noise.  I occasionally loosen the calliper, then press and hold the lever to centralise everything whilst tightening it all up again.  It could be a waste of time but, as I said, it works for me.

Best of luck.

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kevvjj [464 posts] 2 months ago
2 likes

Find a local bike shop that has a Park Tool DT-5.2 Disc Brake Mount Facing Tool (or equivalent).

This fixed 99% of all my squealing issues. Getting the faces of the mounts perfectly flat is key. Very few bikes have this area addressed as they come out of the factory. Even a layer of paint will cause issues.

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ktache [1601 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

About to fit a set of Hope Tech 3s to my new bike.  My first foray into discs.  I don't want them to squeal.  More things to learn about...

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BehindTheBikesheds [3166 posts] 2 months ago
4 likes

Simplifying frame design, lol, it was simple before, have you any idea how much more complex a disc brake frame is compared to a rim brake, you've seen all the extra add on bits that are needed so that you can fit discs right, all the additional 'beefing up' and huge changes in frame design?

The excuse about carbon clinchers melting was feeble, a small number of people, mainly people who have no business descending in the mountains at high speed on carbon clinchers, and that was back in the early days with poorer compounds, Corima carbons have been fantastic for over a decade amngst others. Maybe those wannabe's should learn how to ride descents or simply not cane it when there's no need to or just bring along alu rims if they aren't that great on descents and are worried about their cheap carbn rims!

I'm a mini V user on my tourer/audax/winter racer, it'll take up to 55mm tyres, easily 45s with guards, Specialized made in my opinion the ultimate do it all bike in the Sirrus Pro Ltd, full carbon, room for 40mm tyres plus rack and guard mounts, std 68mm BSC BB and V pegs. Currently running it with Avid 7s but have TRP mini Vs if I decide to convert to drops.

Most of the offerings for gravel/adventure are fat bloaters, even the high end full carbon jobs are heavier than my Sirrus, all are disc brake offerings so for me none are of interest. If Tom Pidcock can win a Worlds junior cyclocross on cantilevers then it's good enough for the rest of us!

For a benefit to a very, very small number of people in a very small fraction of situations were a well set up disc brake will do better than a rim brake, it's just not worth the extra cost/weight and numerous downsides that most disc brake users experience.

 

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hawkinspeter [3616 posts] 2 months ago
2 likes

@BTBS - I just did a quick search on performance difference between rim and disc brakes and found GCN's testing that concluded that rim brakes are indeed faster. (Summary here: https://www.honeybikes.com/blog/2018/3/25/disc-brake-vs-rim-brake-performance-on-road-bikes)

However, for me the most important difference between rims and discs is the wet weather performance. In traffic I really like my brakes to start slowing me down as soon as I activate them and I've found that rim brakes make me a lot more nervous in the wet (I have to ride slower in case cars pull out on me etc). Disc brakes feel a lot nicer to use (just a finger will do with complete control) but it's definitely the reliability factor for me.

Given the choice, I'd go for hydraulic discs every time. (I've clearly fallen for the capitalist propaganda)

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Mungecrundle [1450 posts] 2 months ago
3 likes

The Shimano Dura Ace rim brakes fitted to my 20 year old steel bike on Mavic rims are perfectly good. The Shimano hydraulic discs on my modern carbon bike are simply better.

Easy to write lots of words supporting one technology over another. Constructing conspiracy theories around marketing or nit picking why something new isn't perfect in every scenario, real or imagined. But until you have had a good chance to actually live with and try something different then you have only opinion not informed opinion.

My discs howl now and again but only when wet, and so can rim brakes under the same circumstances. Cleaning them occasionally goes a long way to keeping them quiet.

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fukawitribe [2823 posts] 2 months ago
2 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:

@BTBS - I just did a quick search on performance difference between rim and disc brakes and found GCN's testing that concluded that rim brakes are indeed faster. (Summary here: https://www.honeybikes.com/blog/2018/3/25/disc-brake-vs-rim-brake-performance-on-road-bikes)

However, for me the most important difference between rims and discs is the wet weather performance.

That article has cropped up a couple of times now and is ummm - interesting. Aside from the acknowledged looseness in the tests, they've stitched together some of the timing from the GCN video, doubled it up, and concluded that the lighter (rim-braked) bike is faster uphill. Then, on the descents, they found that the heavier (disc-braked) bike was marginally slower downhill in the dry (0.5%) but significantly faster in the wet - enough to better the deficit from climbing - so they said the rim-brake bike had carbon rims and must have been about twice as bad downhill as one with aluminium rims. So they halved the advantage on the heavier bike and tad-dah - the lighter rim-braked bike wins !!! They did at least admit that there are other areas to consider rather than straight 'speed' and I think it's possibly safe to say from the language in the article that it's the answer they might have prefered ...  1

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hawkinspeter [3616 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
fukawitribe wrote:
hawkinspeter wrote:

@BTBS - I just did a quick search on performance difference between rim and disc brakes and found GCN's testing that concluded that rim brakes are indeed faster. (Summary here: https://www.honeybikes.com/blog/2018/3/25/disc-brake-vs-rim-brake-performance-on-road-bikes)

However, for me the most important difference between rims and discs is the wet weather performance.

That article has cropped up a couple of times now and is ummm - interesting. Aside from the acknowledged looseness in the tests, they've stitched together some of the timing from the GCN video, doubled it up, and concluded that the lighter (rim-braked) bike is faster uphill. Then, on the descents, they found that the heavier (disc-braked) bike was marginally slower downhill in the dry (0.5%) but significantly faster in the wet - enough to better the deficit from climbing - so they said the rim-brake bike had carbon rims and must have been about twice as bad downhill as one with aluminium rims. So they halved the advantage on the heavier bike and tad-dah - the lighter rim-braked bike wins !!! They did at least admit that there are other areas to consider rather than straight 'speed' and I think it's possibly safe to say from the language in the article that it's the answer they might have prefered ...  1

It might be flawed, but I didn't see any other direct comparisons of performance between brakes (I didn't spend long looking though). I would have thought that GCN would be more interested in promoting disc brakes, so the bias surprises me.

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fukawitribe [2823 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:

It might be flawed, but I didn't see any other direct comparisons of performance between brakes (I didn't spend long looking though). I would have thought that GCN would be more interested in promoting disc brakes, so the bias surprises me.

I think a lot of the point is that speed isn't really the be-all and end-all from the GCN videos -  and that article wasn't written by them. The GCN video is remarkably even-handed and interesting, especially in the conclusions and discussion about what could be done more or better.

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hawkinspeter [3616 posts] 2 months ago
1 like
fukawitribe wrote:

I think a lot of the point is that speed isn't really the be-all and end-all from the GCN videos -  and that article wasn't written by them. The GCN video is remarkably even-handed and interesting, especially in the conclusions and discussion about what could be done more or better.

I didn't watch the video, just read that summary. I'll give the video a go later on when it's convenient to use headphones (I much prefer reading articles than watching a video). But yeah, most people buying disc brakes aren't concerned about a few seconds difference in performance.

Edit: watched the video with subtitles now. Looks like the difference is within experimental error.

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StoopidUserName [642 posts] 2 months ago
3 likes

All this marketing bollocks just pisses me off!!!

 

My hobby horse with wooden wheels is fine thank you very much!!! I won't fall for this capialist scam!!!!  3

 

ps. Hope you get it fixed ok, squealing brakes are horrible, I've had 4 disc brake bikes over the years and one of them did squeal until I changed the pads and bedded it in properly for the first time. That was a TRP semi hydro jobbie, not a patch on my shimano ultegra hydraulic brakes (there really is a noticeable difference).

 

No idea about your mtb brakes, you might get more help on a specific mtb forum?

 

And as for maintanaince...once set up, they (full hydro disc brakes) should be less maintanaince than most rim brakes on the market. You change the pads every few thousand miles and thats literally it. No faffing trying to line up and toe in new pads...adjusting them when they wear down or get knocked. And lets not forget, rim brakes can also make a horrible squealing noise in the wet...I know this from uncomfortable experience  1

 

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fukawitribe [2823 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:
fukawitribe wrote:

I think a lot of the point is that speed isn't really the be-all and end-all from the GCN videos -  and that article wasn't written by them. The GCN video is remarkably even-handed and interesting, especially in the conclusions and discussion about what could be done more or better.

I didn't watch the video, just read that summary. I'll give the video a go later on when it's convenient to use headphones (I much prefer reading articles than watching a video). But yeah, most people buying disc brakes aren't concerned about a few seconds difference in performance.

Absolutely, worth watching the video too I reckon, there's a lot of important points missed by the article (plus dubious quoting...)

Edit : I owe the article writers an apology, they didn't halve the descent time - that was my mis-reading of their discussion about compensating for carbon rims - the bent of the article was still mis-leading  even without that IMO.

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Nick T [1273 posts] 2 months ago
1 like

Yep, disc brakes on bicycles are a nonsense

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Plasterer's Radio [528 posts] 2 months ago
1 like
IanEdward wrote:
Quote:

Metathesiaphobia

Nope, but kudos for googling a clever word to be dismissive with smiley

Quote:

Bed them in properly, quick clean now & again, and they are fine.

The usual advice, but they're as well bedded in and as well looked after as a set of brakes could hope for. Anyway, I thought disc brakes were supposed to be low maintenance? 

Low maintenance, not no maintenance.
 

 

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BehindTheBikesheds [3166 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
hawkinspeter wrote:

@BTBS - I just did a quick search on performance difference between rim and disc brakes and found GCN's testing that concluded that rim brakes are indeed faster. (Summary here: https://www.honeybikes.com/blog/2018/3/25/disc-brake-vs-rim-brake-performance-on-road-bikes)

However, for me the most important difference between rims and discs is the wet weather performance. In traffic I really like my brakes to start slowing me down as soon as I activate them and I've found that rim brakes make me a lot more nervous in the wet (I have to ride slower in case cars pull out on me etc). Disc brakes feel a lot nicer to use (just a finger will do with complete control) but it's definitely the reliability factor for me.

Given the choice, I'd go for hydraulic discs every time. (I've clearly fallen for the capitalist propaganda)

I've never not had enough braking in the wet, one adapts to the conditions no matter what you use, the pros have managed on carbon rims in the wet, they've managed with far flexier stirrups/calipers and worse pad compunds too. The restricting factor is the tyres and a persons ability to ride to the conditions, has been for a very long time, more so in the wet.

I'm probably not far off 200,000 miles over 35 years of being on the road, not a massive number compared to some but a decent amount, I started off with chrome steel rims as a teenager, had a few self induced offs along the way but none down to braking efficiency or lack of power and non of the motorist caused incidents would more powerful brakes have helped either.

I've said elsewhere that having more powerful brakes simply induces you to take greater risks, to go in deeper/faster on approach, you cut down thinking time should the worst occur. For me there's too many downsides to discs for a tiny amount of improvement in braking in wet conditions when really you should be going at a speed that gives you the distance to stop no matter what brakes you have.

Similar to my first race bike, my first car had drum brakes all round, 12" wheels with probably some horrible tyres, somehow never managed to crash it, nor run someone over. We've got to a point were the next step has taken us to a point that serves no real purpose for road bikes, even adventure/gravel bikes, has increased bulk, weight, increased ugliness IMO but also has the unintended consequence of reducing thinking time and coplacency particularly in emergencies because one becomes accustomed to the apparent power. Similar thing with motors when disc brakes and ABS became common place, stopping distance restricted by tyres and people still crashed at the same rate because they kept braking later and from higher speeds.

Each to their own but for road bikes in any guise discs are more hassle then they're worth at any level from pootler to pro.

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hawkinspeter [3616 posts] 2 months ago
3 likes

@BTBS - I get your point about cycling to the conditions. The issue I have with rim brakes is when you suddenly need to stop and if the rims are wet, it'll take about one revolution before the brakes start working. With discs - I can cycle normally and if I suddenly have to brake, then at least they'll start working straight away. To be fair, I've never had a crash due to rim brakes, but I've had several moments of terror as I grab a handful of brake and it does nothing for a second or so.

The problem with traffic is that you can go at a speed that allows you to stop in the distance that you can see is clear, but some drivers do dumb things and pull out without looking, turn without indicating etc. Yes, you can ride even slower to allow for the unexpected, but I'd rather have confidence in my brakes and travel at a more reasonable speed. The other thing I've noticed about disc brakes is that they seem to be a lot easier to control e.g. if I hit both brakes and the rear wheel starts to lose grip, it's a lot easier to release it and not lose control.

Ultimately, I don't think people will necessarily take more risks riding with disc brakes as the whole tyre-traction issue is the limiting factor and certainly commuters (like me) don't want to take it to the limit.

My previous bike has rim brakes (really crap long reach ones that I ended up upgrading) and I keep thinking that I should use it as a winter bike, but the difference between that and disc brakes on my current bike just means that the older one sits around unused (and sad).

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Xenophon2 [40 posts] 2 months ago
5 likes

I don't have a stack of studies to back any of the following, just my own admittedly anecdotal experience and a quantum of what I consider to be common sense.

I've ridden bikes with rim brakes on wheel sizes of 349-35 to 700C, alu rims, carbon rims and some alu rims that had a coating of tungsten carbide to improve braking performance.  Road and gravel riding, no MTB stuff.  When dry, rim brakes were ok and with a good set of calipers, levers and pads (Koolstop, Swissstop blue), I'd say that they were on par with my present disc brake setup.  In the rain performance degraded from more or less acceptable to downright scary (on the 349-35 alu rims) when riding at any speed over 18 mph.  None of them even came close to my present SRAM Force 1 hydraulic disc setup in terms of performance.  But, yeah, the discs squeal sometimes (the worst hollerers were koolstop salmon pads on the tungsten carbide coated alu rims though).  I guess it's the price of better performance and tough cookies if I occasionally wake someone when I need to give priority to a car that pops up when I'm cycling to work at 5:30 in the rain.

 

I commute every day, don't live in the sahara.  Those touted benefits of lighter and more aero rim brakes over disc brakes may hold true for professionals but those guys a) don't brake nearly as much as amateur riders simply because they have much better technique from spending many hours in the saddle b) have very low body fat and are in prime condition c) accept extra risk in return for cash and d) have very high quality equipment and don't need to pay for new Zipp or Meilenstein carbon rims that need replacing on a regular basis due to wear.

For the average plod like me who commutes 20 miles a day and rides on average 80 miles every weekend, I seriously doubt rim brakes would objectively be superior.

 

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longassballs [138 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
BehindTheBikesheds wrote:

Simplifying frame design, lol, it was simple before, have you any idea how much more complex a disc brake frame is compared to a rim brake, you've seen all the extra add on bits that are needed so that you can fit discs right, all the additional 'beefing up' and huge changes in frame design?

The excuse about carbon clinchers melting was feeble, a small number of people, mainly people who have no business descending in the mountains at high speed on carbon clinchers, and that was back in the early days with poorer compounds, Corima carbons have been fantastic for over a decade amngst others. Maybe those wannabe's should learn how to ride descents or simply not cane it when there's no need to or just bring along alu rims if they aren't that great on descents and are worried about their cheap carbn rims!

I'm a mini V user on my tourer/audax/winter racer, it'll take up to 55mm tyres, easily 45s with guards, Specialized made in my opinion the ultimate do it all bike in the Sirrus Pro Ltd, full carbon, room for 40mm tyres plus rack and guard mounts, std 68mm BSC BB and V pegs. Currently running it with Avid 7s but have TRP mini Vs if I decide to convert to drops.

Most of the offerings for gravel/adventure are fat bloaters, even the high end full carbon jobs are heavier than my Sirrus, all are disc brake offerings so for me none are of interest. If Tom Pidcock can win a Worlds junior cyclocross on cantilevers then it's good enough for the rest of us!

For a benefit to a very, very small number of people in a very small fraction of situations were a well set up disc brake will do better than a rim brake, it's just not worth the extra cost/weight and numerous downsides that most disc brake users experience.

 

I can't disagree with most of what you write, even when it contradicts my previous post. I realise I'm only parroting all the industry lines.

'Simplified frame design' was the wrong choice of words, hands up. I realise there has had to be massive strengthening to manage forces around and due to the calipers that I am sure was really complicated to design. Simplified and cleaner shapes with less junctions better? Due to the industry push, you can only conclude that when road bike disc brake design & manufacture matures the frames will be cheaper to produce. Same with wheels. Otherwise, what's your reason why the industry is totally abandoning rim brakes?

Oh and when Pidcock won worlds everyone else was on canti's too - you know that!

Like it or not within a couple of years you're not gonna have much of a choice If you want a new bike

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IanEdward [295 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

Lol, I had to leave this thread alone, I don't know why I keep starting threads about disc brakes because I just get myself irritated by them! 

I think I'm just getting annoyed as I keep hearing about these mythical brake set ups that work perfectly and silently in wet and dry, but no amount of experimenting or money on new brake set ups seems to get me any closer.

I've faced the mounts and set the brakes up using a Hayes alignment gauge which gives a perfectly equal gap between pads and rotor on both sides. Not much more I can do there. Will take the pads out and give them a wee toasting over the gas hob to burn of any contaminents but really don't believe it's necessary, they've barely been used on the roads and I run a strict 'no-aerosol' policy in my garage (slightly tongue in cheek comment..).

I bedded each rotor/pad combo in on the front wheel on a long gradual tarmac descent, on a dry day, never once coming to a complete halt, performing at least 20 hard almost-stops. I really was that anal about it. 

I do agree with longasballs though, I don't think the complete market saturation is all to do with the supposed benefits, there must be something in it for the manufacturers, possibly just the mark-up on new hydraulic discs improving their profit margins... The tyre clearance argument is a non-issue, I run 38mm tyres and mudguards under a set of mini-Vs with clearance to spare, so I don't buy the argument that wide tyres NEED discs.

Will just wait patiently and hope for a minor resurgance in rim brakes, similar to threaded BBs making a gradual return after a few years of press-fit ubiquity. Or hope I win the lottery and get something really nice and custom (posts Heretic pic again...)

//hereticbikes.com/images/portfolio/project9.jpg)

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kevvjj [464 posts] 2 months ago
2 likes

I have a set of Shimano XT disc brakes on my 9 year old MTB. In all that time all I have done is replaced the pads a few times. I have never had to bleed them, adjust the caliper or anything else - just replaced pads when needed. Yes, they can make a bit of noise in the wet but so did my v-brakes and certainly anyone I've ever rode with who has carbon rims can't point the finger when it comes to noise - and that's in the dry!

I have a GT grade with SRAM Rival disc brakes which is almost three years old. Same experience (so far) as my MTB. Easy setup, great performance wet or dry and a bit of noise when wet... no bleeding, no caliper adjustment, no brake rub - just pad replacement. As for bedding in, what a load of crap that method is, I've never done it and never had any problems.

 

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IanEdward [295 posts] 2 months ago
1 like
Quote:

As for bedding in, what a load of crap that method is, I've never done it and never had any problems.

Agreed, I've never gone to those lengths before either, was just experimenting to see if 'perfect' bedding in as per manufacturer's instructions would make a difference. Obviously not.

Although someone mentioned above that resin brake pads wearing out quicker, apparently this is related to bedding in, i.e. un-bedded pads can be soft so if you use them in wet/gritty conditions straight away they'll disappear quicker.

Quote:

carbon rims

Yeah, I totally get running discs with carbon rims, although if I was spending carbon rim money it would be on a Sunday best bike that would be unlikely to see early spring Scottish gravel conditions! 

 

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matthewn5 [1341 posts] 2 months ago
1 like

My rim brake carbon wheels howl when I brake hard. At least the pedestrians hear through their headphones!

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CXR94Di2 [2595 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes

I use the cheaper open cut out discs which are a few quid a pair.  These will almost stop squealing from shimano hydraulic brakes. 

I think its the combo of gas build up with mostly solid rotors and ceramic pistons.  I dont get it with any other combination of rotors or calipers.

  I have Hope 4 pots on my road bike and same rotors that I had with Shimano calipers.  This setup doesnt squeal.  Then I have on my shopper SS, Shimano calipers with cheap rotors and again they dont squeal.

A rider I did a tourwith had the latest black 'ice tech' on his expensive Dura Ace bike.  Squealed like mad dry or wet.

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IanEdward [295 posts] 2 months ago
0 likes
Quote:

I use the cheaper open cut out discs which are a few quid a pair.

Which ones? I've run various rotors including the Magura Storm SL which are more cut-out than rotor! Admittedly that was with different brakes (same bike though), but they didn't do much for the noise.

Still tempted to try sintered pads as I remember them being relatively quiet in the wet on my mountainbike, but I tried sintered pads in some SRAM brakes recently and they were awful, squeeled in the wet AND in the dry!

Also worried about using sintered pads on a rotor that has already been bedded in with resin pads...

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CXR94Di2 [2595 posts] 2 months ago
1 like
IanEdward wrote:
Quote:

I use the cheaper open cut out discs which are a few quid a pair.

Which ones? I've run various rotors including the Magura Storm SL which are more cut-out than rotor! Admittedly that was with different brakes (same bike though), but they didn't do much for the noise.

Still tempted to try sintered pads as I remember them being relatively quiet in the wet on my mountainbike, but I tried sintered pads in some SRAM brakes recently and they were awful, squeeled in the wet AND in the dry!

Also worried about using sintered pads on a rotor that has already been bedded in with resin pads...

Ive had good success with these. https://www.wiggle.co.uk/lifeline-one-piece-stainless-disc-rotor-160mm/?...|sGqMU42pR_dm|mcrid|295292317327|mkw||mmt||mrd|5360597829uk|mslid||&mkwid=sGqMU42pR_dm&pcrid=295292317327&prd=5360597829uk&pgrid=58852352866&ptaid=pla-521629078002&gclid=Cj0KCQjwwODlBRDuARIsAMy_28XW6mJioZtt5e7GV0G0zM1SMuv_ej8m_UGWmDdFI5OS4LEHp9x8gZYaAlP7EALw_wcB

It takes a few times braking with new pads to bed into rotors. I go through a set of pads in a week touring mountains. I put on a new set before a tour and it takes one mountain descent to bed in new pads