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Verdict: 
Very low weight for the money but front wheel stiffness removes some of the shine of this otherwise impressive wheelset
Weight: 
1,336g
Contact: 

If you want to shed some weight from your road bike, one of the best things you can do is upgrade to a lighter pair of wheels. At 1,336g and costing under £500, these Syntace W21 Road wheels offer a good price-to-weight ratio.

They offer a decent performance boost for the money, too, though the low weight does come with compromised front wheel stiffness, and the rims are a bit narrow by modern standards. The low weight also comes with the caveat of a 90kg rider weight limit.

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The details

The wheels feature a rim that is 24mm deep – so definitely on the shallow side, these aren't designed for aerodynamics – with a 21mm external width and 16mm internal width. That's looking a bit narrow compared with some of the more progressive wheel designs that have wider rims to better cater for the demand for wider tyres. Even so, they worked well with the 25mm tyres used to test them.

Syntace W21 Road Wheelset - detail.jpg

They're also tubeless-compatible if you want to ditch the inner tubes, but work just fine with regular tyres and inner tubes. A wear indicator lets you keep an eye on their longevity.

Spinning away at the centre of the rims are diddy little hubs that Syntace has developed using technology borrowed from its mountain bike division. They're called HiTorque RS hubs and weigh 73g and 191g for the front and rear.

Syntace W21 Road Wheelset - rear hub 2.jpg
Syntace W21 Road Wheelset - front hub 2.jpg

The front hub is rather unusual in that the flanges are very narrowly spaced – most hubs have the flanges as far apart as possible to increase the bracing angle to improve lateral stiffness. Syntace describes the reason behind the narrow width is to do with reducing the weight and improving aerodynamics. That may be so, but it does impact the stiffness of the front wheel. More on that later...

Syntace W21 Road Wheelset - front hub.jpg

Inside the hubs are two double-sealed bearings with special oil-filled guards to prevent dirt ingress and prolong the smoothness they possess out of the box. The bearing preload can be easily adjusted with a MicroAdjust system, using a small Allen tool to rotate the outer collar. Out of the box, they spun very smoothly and needed no adjustment.

A 20-tooth freehub with 18 degrees of engagement is 10 and 11-speed compatible with Shimano and SRAM, and is packed with a pair of double-sealed bearings. Both hubs are quick release hubs in a conventional 9x100mm front and 10x130mm rear axle width.

Syntace W21 Road Wheelset - rear hub.jpg

Bringing the hubs and rims together are Syntace's own AeroSpokes, with 20 in the front wheel and 24 in the rear. The front spokes are radially laced, the rear are double crossed. Syntace has employed an idea it calls Balanced Spokes, which involves thicker spokes on the drive side of the rear wheel to deal with the stresses the wheel is subject to.

The performance

Adding light wheels to any road bike is going to make a noticeable difference, and so it was the case with these. You notice the weight on the scales but feeling the difference on the climbs is harder to assess and depends on the weight of the wheels they are replacing.

I used a Cannondale SuperSix Evo to test the wheels, and they certainly give the bike a more flighty feeling when manoeuvring around country lanes and cresting rises in the roads. The rear wheel provides a good level of stiffness noticeable when pushing the bike through corners and down hills, and transfers power to the road.

The same can't be said for the front wheel, though, with a display of flex when pushing the front of the bike hard into turns. An annoying tendency for the spokes to frequently 'pop' and 'tinkle' accompanied most rides, most noticeable when riding out of the saddle and putting a high load on the front. I'm not a heavy rider and nowhere near the max rider weight limit.

> Check out our guide to the best road cycling wheels

Despite the flex from the front wheel, the wheelset as a combination proved pretty taut and lively for a mix of hilly and undulating riding. The low weight makes them a hoot on the hills, especially longer drags where any weight saving can be appreciated. They are compliant over rougher roads, and the rim width, even though it's starting to look a bit narrow against newer rim designs, provides a good match for the 25mm tyres I tested them with.

The aluminium rims have a machined braking track that beds in quickly and provides very assured braking performance in all conditions. The freehub is extremely noisy – people will hear you coming before they see you – but it engages quickly when you need to snap the bike forward after a period of freewheeling.

In summary, they're a good set of wheels with an impressively low weight for the money, with durable and easily adjustable hub bearings, but the front wheel flex and the associated noise just robs them of being highly recommended, especially when the wheel market is so competitive and there are many good choices.

However, looking through the road.cc wheel review archive, I can't find another wheelset that offers such lightness for anywhere near the same price, so if you really want light wheels on a budget and you're well within the max rider weight limit, these might well suit you.

Verdict

Very low weight for the money but front wheel stiffness removes some of the shine of this otherwise impressive wheelset

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road.cc test report

Make and model: Syntace W21 Road Wheelset

Size tested: Rim width 22mm

Tell us what the wheel is for, and who it's aimed at. What do the manufacturers say about it? How does that compare to your own feelings about it?

Syntace says: "The Syntace W21 wheelset is perfect for people who are looking for a strong and reliable wheelset at around 1300 grams. A big advantage of this wheelset is the 10 years warranty Syntage gives on this W21 Road wheelset. Syntage is mainly known for their mountainbike products. The experience they gained with these products has been used in the development of the Syntace W21 Road wheelset. This set is strong, wide and light."

Tell us some more about the technical aspects of the wheel?

Version  
  W21R Front Wheel  
  Weight  
  575 g  
  Rim width  
  22 mm  
  Spokes  
  20 Syntace AeroSpokes, black  
  Rim material  
  Aluminium  
  Hub material  
  Aluminium  
  Axle  
  Quick release with MicroAdjust  
  Brake design  
  Rim brakes  
  Color  
  Raceblack with laserlogo  
  Rider weight  
  Real 90 kg  

Version  
  W21R Rear Wheel  
  Weight  
  735 g  
  Rim width  
  22 mm  
  Spokes  
  24 Syntace AeroSpokes, black  
  Rim material  
  Aluminium  
  Freewheel body  
  Standard-Road-Cassette
(SRAM & Shimano, 10-/11-speed)  
  Hub material  
  Aluminium  
  Axle  
  Quick release with MicroAdjust  
  Brake design  
  Rim brakes  
  Color  
  Raceblack with laserlogo  
  Rider weight  
  90 kg

Rate the wheel for quality of construction:
 
7/10
Rate the wheel for performance:
 
7/10
Rate the wheel for durability:
 
8/10
Rate the wheel for weight
 
9/10
Rate the wheel for value:
 
8/10

Considering the low weight, these wheels offer excellent value for money.

Did the wheels stay true? Any issues with spoke tension?

They remained straight and true and spokes evenly tensioned during the test period.

How easy did you find it to fit tyres?

Very easy, no tyre levers needed.

How did the wheel extras (eg skewers and rim tape) perform?

No skewers provided.

Tell us how the wheel performed overall when used for its designed purpose

For a light climbing wheelset they provided great performance.

Tell us what you particularly liked about the wheel

The low weight for not a lot of money.

Tell us what you particularly disliked about the wheel

The front wheel flex and noise.

Did you enjoy using the wheel? Mostly

Would you consider buying the wheel? Maybe

Would you recommend the wheel to a friend? Maybe

Use this box to explain your score

On paper these wheels offer a very lightweight package for not a lot of money and generally the performance was very good, but the front wheel lacks stiffness and was noisy too.

Overall rating: 7/10

About the tester

Age: 31  Height: 180cm  Weight: 67kg

I usually ride:   My best bike is:

I've been riding for: 10-20 years  I ride: Every day  I would class myself as: Expert

I regularly do the following types of riding: road racing, time trialling, cyclo-cross, commuting, touring, mountain biking

David has worked on the road.cc tech team since July 2012. Previously he was editor of Bikemagic.com and before that staff writer at RCUK. He's a seasoned cyclist of all disciplines, from road to mountain biking, touring to cyclo-cross, he only wishes he had time to ride them all. He's mildly competitive, though he'll never admit it, and is a frequent road racer but is too lazy to do really well. He currently resides in the Cotswolds.

8 comments

Avatar
MMCV [2 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

I would be interested how you achieve "pop and tinkle" on a radially spoked wheel (apart from a tiny bit of settle at the nipples of a brand new wheel which would pass very quickly,) and notice that although the front hub spacing seems narrower than normal it is no narrower than the spacing of the rear wheel flanges which sustain higher load without problems. Unless the wheel has been built under-tensioned I would expect no issues at all with a wheel like this so I suspect the reviewer is suffering from a bad case of confirmation bias associated with prior assumptions.

Avatar
userfriendly [625 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes
Quote:

I can't find another wheelset that offers such lightness for anywhere near the same price

Julius AC22. You're welcome. No lack of stiffness either, from what I can tell (with my 70 kilograms anyway).

Avatar
Anthony.C [278 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

Yes, you can build a light wheel using budget rims and hubs and people who don't know any better will buy them because they are light, thinking they are getting a bargain.

Avatar
Disfunctional_T... [449 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

>The same can't be said for the front wheel, though, with a display of flex
> when pushing the front of the bike hard into turns.

When cornering, isn't nearly all the load on the wheel vertical? We are not talking about a 4 wheel vehicle.

Avatar
fukawitribe [2936 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes
Disfunctional_Threshold wrote:

>The same can't be said for the front wheel, though, with a display of flex
> when pushing the front of the bike hard into turns.

When cornering, isn't nearly all the load on the wheel vertical? We are not talking about a 4 wheel vehicle.

The load on the wheel when cornering will be opposing the tendency for bike and rider going straight on and staying upright so it's hard to imagine a definition of vertical where that's true. Can you elaborate ?

Avatar
wycombewheeler [1373 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes
fukawitribe wrote:
Disfunctional_Threshold wrote:

>The same can't be said for the front wheel, though, with a display of flex > when pushing the front of the bike hard into turns. When cornering, isn't nearly all the load on the wheel vertical? We are not talking about a 4 wheel vehicle.

The load on the wheel when cornering will be opposing the tendency for bike and rider going straight on and staying upright so it's hard to imagine a definition of vertical where that's true. Can you elaborate ?

the bike leans over when cornering, such that the gravitional force pulling you down, and the centripetal force trying to push you to the outside of the bend resolve into a force that aligns with the bike.

If there is a net force trying to bend the wheels sideways, then you are going to fall over.

 

so the definition of vertical here, is from the point of view of the bike (or wheel) and not the world.

Avatar
Disfunctional_T... [449 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes

Well the wheelset reviews here are perpetually ridiculous. The reviewers always spout cliches like "spin really well", "accelerates quickly", and "vertically compliant".

1. All wheels spin well. Friction losses due to hubs is negligible.

2. The amount of energy required to spin a wheel up to speed is trivial. Any five year old child can spin a wheel up to speed with one flick of the hand.

3. The vertical compliance of all wheelsets is negligible.

Avatar
fukawitribe [2936 posts] 3 years ago
0 likes
wycombewheeler wrote:
fukawitribe wrote:
Disfunctional_Threshold wrote:

>The same can't be said for the front wheel, though, with a display of flex > when pushing the front of the bike hard into turns. When cornering, isn't nearly all the load on the wheel vertical? We are not talking about a 4 wheel vehicle.

The load on the wheel when cornering will be opposing the tendency for bike and rider going straight on and staying upright so it's hard to imagine a definition of vertical where that's true. Can you elaborate ?

the bike leans over when cornering, such that the gravitional force pulling you down, and the centripetal force trying to push you to the outside of the bend resolve into a force that aligns with the bike.

If there is a net force trying to bend the wheels sideways, then you are going to fall over.

 

so the definition of vertical here, is from the point of view of the bike (or wheel) and not the world.

Indeed, that was my point about the physics. Pushing the meaning of vertical when you allow rotational regauging don't you think ? Edit : believe the load vector doesn't go exactly through the plane of the wheel during cornering the whole time anyway. IIRC the upper (outside) spokes are in slightly greater tension than the lower, but I'd have to look that up. Glad to proved wrong on that, memories from a lecture a loooong time ago.