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Amazon Prime Day 2021: a round up of the best cycling deals

Here are some great deals on cycling computers, watches, clothing, bike cleaning products and more!

Amazon Prime Day is here (it actually runs for 48 hours on 21-22 June 2021 until stock runs out) and we've done all the hard work for you, sieving through to find you the best deals available.

Amazon Prime Day is an annual deal event open to Prime members. Amazon can be hit or miss when it comes to cycling gear. There can be an incredible choice of great useful products on offer, as well as some to steer clear of. We’ve found the best deals on cycling kit that’s worth it, starting with the biggest savings…

Muc-Off 907 Nano-Tech Cleaner 5 litre: Save 60% - Was £34.37, now £13.83

Muc-Off 907 Nano-Tech Cleaner 5 litre

 > How to clean your bike - from a quick lick to a full makeover

This massive saving is on the 5 litre version of Muc-Off’s fast-action, biodegradable bike cleaner that’s safe on all surfaces including carbon fibre, as well as disc brakes. Muc-Off claims the Nano Technology formula used breaks down dirt and grime on a molecular level for a proper clean.

> Review: Muc-Off Nano Tech Fast Action Bike Cleaner

Buy over here

Topeak Aero Wedge Pack: Save 53% - Was £18.99, now £9

Topeak Aero Wedge Pack

This is Topeak’s large 1.48 to1.97 litre capacity saddle bag for carrying tools. It is made from rugged 1,200-denier Cordura material with DuPont Teflon coating for some weather resistance and is attached with the strap mount and snap-on buckles. There’s also a 3M reflective strip and rear light attachment point.

If you are looking for even bigger bags for carrying more than just tools and nutrition, check out our buyer’s guide for bikepacking bags over here.

Buy over here

Ride: Cycle the World (Travel Guide) Hardcover Book: Save 50% - Was £20, now £10

Dorling Kindersley has compiled together 100 worthwhile cycling routes from around the world and it’s a great starting point for an epic adventure. There are maps and elevation profiles, and you can also download the GPX files of the routes from an associated website if the book really does inspire you to give one a go!

> Buyer’s guide: 42 of the best cycling books — check out the books every cyclist should own

The patrol road between the inner and outer Berlin Wall is now a fairly flat tarmac path, and the whole circuit makes for a 100-mile history trail and it’s now on reviewer Richard Peploe’s riding hit list for example.

> Review: Ride – Cycle The World

Buy over here

Muc-Off Bike Cleaner Concentrate: Save 48% - Was £19.99, now £10.44

Muc-Off Bike Cleaner Concentrate

Looking for an eco-friendly product for making your bike clean and shiny? This 1 litre spray bottle is reusable and reduced packaging has also been used. The 1 litre concentrate mixes with water to make up 4 litres and this concentrated form features Muc-Off’s Nano technology formula for deep cleaning. It’s also fully biodegradable, that’s free from acids, solvents and CFCs.

Buy over here

Unisky Fluid Bike Trainer: Save 40% - Was £159.99, now £95.99

trainer amazon prime day.PNG

Ok, so if you're Mark Cavendish this might be a little lightweight... but for the rest of us who want a wheel-on trainer that's simple to assemble for aerobic training, the Unisky Fluid trainer looks like a bargain... we've certainly never seen a fluid trainer priced this low!

> 15 of the best turbo trainers

A fluid trainer uses fluid resistance to make the workout harder the tougher you pedal, so in theory there's no wattage limit. A dual locking system keeps your bike securely in place, and an aluminium roller should provide a relatively realistic experience while allowing you to get plenty of life out of your trainer tyre. Most 700c rim braked road bikes and 26-29" mountain bikes will fit, and you also get a riser block thrown in to steady and level things at the front. Add a cheap speed/cadence sensor and you're set up on Zwift for a fraction over 100 quid! 

Be quick, this is a lightening deal that ends at 9.35pm!

Buy over here

Buff Merino Wool Headwear: Save 39% - Was £22, now £13.49

Buff Merino Wool Headwear

Made from 100% natural merino wool this is a great addition for your winter cycling wardrobe. It’ll keep your neck and ears warm in the cold, and it’ll also wick away moisture to keep you cool. Merino is also super soft and the seamless stitching should reduce irritation. The natural fabric is also odour resistant.

Buy over here

Garmin Edge Explore GPS bike computer: Save 32% - Was £219.99, now £149.99

Garmin Edge Explore GPS bike computer

The Explore is Garmin’s 3” touchscreen bike computer that has Garmin’s Cycle Maps preloaded with turn-by-turn navigation, as well as Trendline’s popularity for finding the most used on- and off-road routes. It can be paired with the Varia smart light system and the device has a claimed battery life of up to 12 hours.

Here’s more information explaining the Garmin Edge range

Buy over here

Sealskinz Waterproof All Weather Gloves: Save 31% - Was £45, now £31.25

Sealskinz Waterproof All Weather Gloves

These are very well made 100% waterproof gloves that breathe well. They’re touchscreen compatible and feature an anti-slip lining that’s designed to give you control while pretty much eliminating liner pull-out.

> Sealskinz Waterproof All Weather Multi-Activity Glove with Fusion Control

Buy over here

AfterShokz OpenMove Wireless Bone Conduction Headphones: Save 20% - Was £79.95, now £63.96

AfterShokz OpenMove Wireless Bone Conduction Headphones

The open-ear design of these wireless headphones allows you to listen to music or podcasts as you ride without traffic noise being blocked out. The OpenMove is the brand’s accessible way of trying bone conduction headphones and reviewer Steve Williams found they’re light, effective and comfortable. The ergonomic wrapround design means should stay put and they work with helmets. The OpenMove also comes with a two-year warranty.

> Review: Aftershokz OpenMove Wireless Bone Conduction Headphones

Buy over here

Devola 12” Pedestal Air Circulator Fan with Remote Control: Save 24% - Was £109.99, now £83.99

Devola 12” Pedestal Air Circulator Fan

Looking to improve your indoor turbo riding experience? This is a powerful fan with an airflow of 19m³/min and a wind speed of 4.8m/s (about 11mph) at maximum capacity, and the 12 different speeds can be flipped between without getting off your bike thanks to the remote control.

> Buyer's guide: 12 of the best smart home trainers for 2021 — get fit indoors

Buy over here

Apple TV (64 GB, 4th generation: Save 11% - Was £189, now £169

Apple TV 64 GB

Do you want to ride around virtual worlds such as Zwift on a big screen? Then an Apple TV is a great choice for getting set up for a high-quality viewing experience. Zwift recommends the 4K box because it has a faster processor for a smoother riding and racing experience.

> How to set up Zwift to try indoor training on any device

Buy over here

Garmin HRM-Dual Heart Rate Monitor Chest Strap: Save 12% - Was £60.14, now £52.95

 

Garmin HRM-DUAL Heart Rate Monitor

This is Garmin’s premium chest heart rate strap that transmits heart rate data over Bluetooth Low Energy technology as well as ANT+. It has a battery life of around 3.5 years (with average use of 1 hour per day) and a removable heart module for washing the strap. A heart rate monitor is a useful training aid for tracking your effort level and the data can be seen on GPS devices as well as online training platforms such as Zwift.

> Buyer’s guide: 10 best heart rate monitors for cycling — get useful fitness data

Buy over here

Kendal Mint Cake: Save 32% on whey protein powder, save 20% on bars + more 

kendal mint cake.PNG

It turns out this classic northern confectionery is the perfect fuel for endurance sports, and is a favourite of ultra cyclists, runners and mountaineers. If you want a minty, sugary kick for less this Prime day then a box of six chocolate-coated or original Kendal Mint Cake bars are both down to £6.39 from £7.99 for Prime members. There's also a huge 32% off KMC's chocolate mint-flavoured whey protein for optimal recovery (down to £16.99 from £24.99), and 25% off the Electrolyte Energy Drink Power (down to £14.99 from £19.99). 

Buy Whey Protein Powder over here
Buy bars over here
Buy Energy Drink Powder over here

Insta360 ONE R Action Camera: Save 20% - was £299.99, now £250 (plus free battery case)

insta360 camera

If you want to film your rides, then the Insta360 is a decent and fairly affordable option. With an IPX8 waterproof lens, touchscreen and voice control, it records in 4K and also has 'FlowState' tech, that promises to achieve "gimbal-like stabilisation without the gimbal". 

> How to buy the best bike camera, plus 6 of the best 

Buy over here

Bike U Lock with Cable, Via Velo Heavy Duty bike lock with cable: Save 17% - was £19.99, now £16.99

via velo lock

While there's no Sold Secure rating on this, the reviews are mostly positive and you get both a D-lock and cable that a light-fingered passer-by would have to cut through - so it looks like a solid option if you need something to lock up your bike-to-work bike in a facility that is already reasonably secure. 

Buy over here

Peaty's Disc Brake Cleaner: Save 20% - Was £7.99, now £6.39

peatys disc brake cleaner amazon prime day.PNG

If your disc brakes need a spruce up then according to off.road.cc reviewer Jim Clarkson, you needn't look past this biodegradable can of cleaning magic from Peaty's. Jim says: "This stubby little 400ml can packs an effective punch of quick-drying solvent which really cleans away muck. One blast takes away a lot of the oils or grease, and a second spray clears almost everything."

Better stock up while it's only six quid a can!

Buy over here

Veaoiy 16-in-1 multi tool and puncture repair kit: Save 24% - Was £10.49, now £7.99

puncture repair kit - amazon prime day.PNG

This convenient set combines everything you need to make quick adjustments on the fly, or patch up your tube if you're unlucky enough to get a flat. The handy pounch includes a 16-in-1 tool with numerous hex key sizes, a phillips and flat head screwdriver and more, and you also get two tyre levers and patches to do your puncture repair job. 

Be quick, this is a lightening offer than ends at 9.45pm!

Buy over here

Balhvit 400 Lumen Bike Lights Set: Save 20% - Was £17.99, now £14.39

balhvit light set amazon prime day

This light set was already very affordable, and crazy cheap with the Prime price at under 15 quid. The front gives off 400 lumens, while both have five modes, are IPX5 waterproof and USB-rechargeable. You also get four modes on the front and six on the rear with various levels of steady or flashing lighting depending on how you want to be seen. 

> The best 2021 front lights for cycling: road.cc's big beam comparison

Buy over here

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31 comments

Avatar
Boopop | 2 years ago
1 like

Everything has an environmental impact, almost everything (at least highly complex products with a long production chain) at this point probably involves at least a little worker abuse at some point in the process.

Everyone has to draw the line somewhere, and "what about that on the other side of the line, that's not ethical" is not a good argument to do nothing (or live in a cave eating fungus). It's not all or nothing.

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MattieKempy | 2 years ago
2 likes

Even if you park the ethical questions about Amazon's mistreatment of staff and bullying of people trying to unionise in the US, you still can't hide from the fact that Jeff Bezos pays less than 3% tax compared to the average 24% tax that most ordinary working Americans pay. Don't put money in his pocket; instead go to a retailer who gives a fuck about you and pays taxes like the rest of us.

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AlsoSomniloquism replied to MattieKempy | 2 years ago
2 likes

However part of the reason he pays so little is because he has his charitable donations and other things make him exempt from some taxes. He supposedly gave $10billion to climate change funds in 2020 for example. So is direct charitable donations better then it all going into the pot for the Government? Also that 3% on his taxable income is probably still huge compared to the average 24% paid on a 70k income. 

The main thing here is that they are so rich, they can pay accountants money to avoid higher tax using legal methods so close those methods off first if possible. 

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Captain Badger replied to AlsoSomniloquism | 2 years ago
2 likes
AlsoSomniloquism wrote:

However part of the reason he pays so little is because he has his charitable donations and other things make him exempt from some taxes. He supposedly gave $10billion to climate change funds in 2020 for example. So is direct charitable donations better then it all going into the pot for the Government? Also that 3% on his taxable income is probably still huge compared to the average 24% paid on a 70k income. 

The main thing here is that they are so rich, they can pay accountants money to avoid higher tax using legal methods so close those methods off first if possible. 

No it's not. Why does being rich absolve you from supporting what society needs? Eg health care, schools, social security, infrastructure, policing - all the things that cnts like Bezos need to ensure they get rich of the backs of more vulenerable folk.

I'd be a lot less contemptuous about these w4nkers if they paid their share, and donated to good causes. WTF do they want, a pat on the head from the rest of us whilst we subsidise their "good works"?

as for "doing his bit for climate change" (not your quote Also, I know), his entire company, and the politico-economic system that it relies on is essentially a vehicle to enable the rape of the planet to make a few arseholes like him rich. If he made a proper goal of ending that I'd be impressed. That and paying his facking taxes.

 

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Rich_cb replied to MattieKempy | 2 years ago
1 like

Wasn't that 3% figure based on some rather dubious maths?

I think it was a percentage of his wealth rather than his income.

Nobody pays 24% tax on their wealth.

I'm all for fair taxation but when people throw around deliberately misleading figures it really doesn't help.

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Rendel Harris replied to Rich_cb | 2 years ago
1 like
Rich_cb wrote:

Wasn't that 3% figure based on some rather dubious maths? I think it was a percentage of his wealth rather than his income. Nobody pays 24% tax on their wealth. I'm all for fair taxation but when people throw around deliberately misleading figures it really doesn't help.

2014-2018 Bezos was paid salary of just over $4BN and paid taxes of just under $1BN, so roughly 24% tax was paid. However in the same period his personal wealth rose by $99BN, but as most of his wealth is in stocks in his company he doesn't have to pay tax on it unless he sells them. That's what the  (justified, I'd say) outcry is about, not that the wealthy are actually not paying the taxes they're obliged to, but that governments allow them not to pay tax on their primary source of income.

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Rich_cb replied to Rendel Harris | 2 years ago
1 like

Stocks rising in price is not income.

It's appreciation of an asset.

If you taxed rising stock prices like income you would destroy most pensions instantly.

The media like to put out these misleading reports to create outcry which creates interest which makes them money. They literally couldn't care if the report itself is nonsense.

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Rendel Harris replied to Rich_cb | 2 years ago
0 likes
Rich_cb wrote:

Stocks rising in price is not income. It's appreciation of an asset. If you taxed rising stock prices like income you would destroy most pensions instantly. The media like to put out these misleading reports to create outcry which creates interest which makes them money. They literally couldn't care if the report itself is nonsense.

You've never heard of scaled taxation, I take it? The concept that there might be a threshold allowance? We can set it at £1BN, don't think many people's pensions will take a hit then.

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Rich_cb replied to Rendel Harris | 2 years ago
1 like

Pension funds often own far more than 1bn in stocks.

They'd have a huge amount of paper work to do in order to show compliance. More paperwork directly increases their costs which directly reduces the pensions of millions of ordinary people.

How would you address stock market falls? Last year the stock market tanked right at the end of the financial year. Should we have sent out huge tax rebates to all the billionaires?

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Rendel Harris replied to Rich_cb | 2 years ago
0 likes
Rich_cb wrote:

Pension funds often own far more than 1bn in stocks. They'd have a huge amount of paper work to do in order to show compliance. More paperwork directly increases their costs which directly reduces the pensions of millions of ordinary people.

Absolute nonsense, any pension fund could demonstrate at the push of a button how many pensioners they represent, I wasn't suggesting that pension funds would be taxed, just individuals.

Rich_cb wrote:

How would you address stock market falls? Last year the stock market tanked right at the end of the financial year. Should we have sent out huge tax rebates to all the billionaires?

Well I tell you what, here's a radical idea, we tax profits but don't give rebates for losses, what do you think? Crazy but it might just work.

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Rich_cb replied to Rendel Harris | 2 years ago
1 like

However you spin it there will be increased costs for pension funds so decreased pensions for their savers.

If you tax profits but refuse to rebate losses you accentuate the risk of holding stocks and of floating on the stock market.

If you buy a stock and then sell it a few years later for the exact same price you bought it for you may still be liable for huge amounts of tax if it fluctuated in price at the wrong time.

More companies will stay private as a result and guess who'll miss out once more? Pension funds and ordinary investors.

A great plan if you want to enrich private equity companies and reduce the value of pensions. If that's not your aim then perhaps it's not so great.

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Rendel Harris replied to Lance ꜱtrongarm | 2 years ago
0 likes
Nigel Garrage wrote:

...as for the idea of paying tax on stock holdings, which are after all a major engine of growth for the entire economy, please can the whingers volunteer to pay wealth tax on their own properties and pension holdings which benefit no one except themselves.

Fair taxation should always be scaled so that it has as little substantive impact on the taxpayer as possible. For the average earner, to pay a tax on capital property gains or pension funds would be punitive; only the most swivel-eyed rightwing loon would claim that Mr Bezos would suffer in any way by having to pay, say, $5BN tax on his $100BN profits. He'd still be left with $95BN, you see. The idea that taxation is only acceptable if everyone pays, proportionately, the same is risible.

Avatar
Rendel Harris replied to Lance ꜱtrongarm | 2 years ago
1 like
Nigel Garrage]
</p>

<p>[quote=Nigel Garrage

wrote:

 Where does all this tax go? Why should someone who tries hard have to subsidise a lazy git?

Tories. As P.G.Wodehouse said of aunts, "sooner or later, out pops the cloven hoof." That one sentence reveals all one needs to know about you and removes any point in further discussion. From now on, as with your soulmate and/or previous incarnation Socrapi, I shall be ignoring your sad trolling on this site, I hope everyone else does the same.

Avatar
hawkinspeter replied to Rendel Harris | 2 years ago
1 like
Rendel Harris]</p>

<p>

[quote=Rendel Harris

wrote:
Nigel Garrage wrote:

 Where does all this tax go? Why should someone who tries hard have to subsidise a lazy git?

Tories. As P.G.Wodehouse said of aunts, "sooner or later, out pops the cloven hoof." That one sentence reveals all one needs to know about you and removes any point in further discussion. From now on, as with your soulmate and/or previous incarnation Socrapi, I shall be ignoring your sad trolling on this site, I hope everyone else does the same.

Are you sure that's a Tory viewpoint? I thought that "trying hard" vs "laziness" was more of a communist dichotomy whereas Capitalism is surely based on "has a lot" vs "has little". Isn't the point of Capitalism that you make profit from the capital that you have?

Avatar
Rendel Harris replied to hawkinspeter | 2 years ago
1 like
hawkinspeter wrote:

Isn't the point of Capitalism that you make profit from the capital that you have?

That's the reality of capitalism, but Tories like to pretend that it's really only "hard work" (whether sitting on your arse in a plush office making deals over the telephone is harder work than doing a shift down the pit or in the chicken rendering plant, making the profits that allow others to benefit and claim their luxury, is somewhat moot) that leads to wealth, nothing to do with inherited wealth and/or privilege.

Avatar
TheBillder replied to Lance ꜱtrongarm | 2 years ago
3 likes
Nigel wrote:

Marginal personal tax rates are already progressive and act as a disincentive to better yourself - if you earn anywhere near the bandings you'll know for example there is already a marginal tax rate of 60% at 100k earnings as personal allowance is tapered - already ridiculously high. There are also several other instances (such as stopping child benefits) that produce similar effects further down the income scale.

How much is "fair" tax? Where does all this tax go? Why should someone who tries hard have to subsidise a lazy git? All good questions.

Yes, this is why all those on £99k say "oh, it's not worth it, don't bother" when offered a pay rise. The point is that you 101st thousand isn't quite so important to the recipient, just as an extra £100 on a £10k bike isn't.

Also, the marginal rates for those trying to come off benefits are not really what you imply. If the state gives you £100 a week in benefits, and you get a tiny amount of part time work which gets you £20, that £20 will not be taxed but you will lose it from your benefits. So the effect is exactly the same as a 100% marginal rate. At various points there are other traps, such as withdrawal of free school meals, the need for childcare etc, that can make the person who wants to better themselves and contribute worse off - a marginal rate of over 100%. Not to mention the loss of time - being poor and living cheaply is hard work and it takes time to do it (eg walk 3 miles to a cheaper shop to save £5).

By the way, the lazy gits who choose to stay on benefits are enormously outnumbered by those struggling and would love a way out. Help to Buy and other economically illiterate bribes to people significantly richer than benefit recipients are miles out of reach and actually serve to pull up the drawbridge, inflate asset prices, enrich building companies whose directors fund the Conservative party and contribute to the sclerosis of the economy. Tying up so much national wealth in housing is quite pointless given that we all need one. Apart from our dear Queen and our worthy celebrities who need many more than one.

Jeff Bezos' tax deductions for charitable donations aren't a great idea (and nor is Gift Aid), because this says that Jeff, or the charities, are better at spending public money than an elected government. At times this may be true, but we can't vote them out.

Avatar
AlsoSomniloquism replied to Lance ꜱtrongarm | 2 years ago
1 like

Of course, talking about the housing market the main driver of higher prices has been unlimited immigration from the EU, so I'm sure you'll join with me in celebrating leaving that corrupt, rotten institution for good

Wow. All the fault of all these *check notes* corrupt rotten foreign people studying or working here. I'm sure kicking them all out will mean no workforce shortages or anything like that.

Avatar
Eton Rifle replied to Lance ꜱtrongarm | 2 years ago
2 likes
Nigel Garrage wrote:

And as for the idea of paying tax on stock holdings, which are after all a major engine of growth for the entire economy

Utter bollocks. The secondary market in equities is almost completely disconnected from the real economy. Bezos' ballooning share-based wealth benefits no-one but him and other holders of the same equity.

It is, however, quite a widespread fallacy, equally believed by those on both the left and the right. Trump famously tweeted increases in the Dow Jones as meaning more jobs. Then again, he was particularly stupid.

Avatar
Rich_cb replied to Eton Rifle | 2 years ago
2 likes

Firstly, pension funds are pretty major investors in the stock market. Any rise in stock prices therefore benefits huge swathes of society.

Secondly, IPOs and similar activities directly translate stock prices into jobs. Many tech companies have literally never made a penny in profit yet have generated thousands of jobs using the proceeds of their stock market listings.

Avatar
Captain Badger replied to Rich_cb | 2 years ago
0 likes
Rich_cb wrote:

..Nobody pays 24% tax on their wealth. ...

No the financially vulnerable pay a great deal more than that

Edit: Sorry Rich, I misread you. Of course, wealth should not be confused with income, as the poorest in society have none of the former as opposed to little of the latter

Avatar
Captain Badger replied to Lance ꜱtrongarm | 2 years ago
1 like
Nigel Garrage wrote:

You haven't defined what "financially vulnerable" means, but ironically making a company highly leveraged (and therefore financially vulnerable) is the primary way to avoid tax, by offsetting profits against interest payments. E.g LBO https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leveraged_buyout If by financially vulnerable you mean people at the bottom of the income scale, they typically pay zero tax on wealth (as they don't have any) and a net-negative rate of income tax as they receive more in benefits and subsidies than they pay in tax.

Well that's alright then. Solving societal problems tory style.

What's next on your to-do list - racism? misogyny? 

Avatar
Rendel Harris replied to Lance ꜱtrongarm | 2 years ago
1 like
Nigel Garrage wrote:

Extreme wealth is a side effect of our highly scalable and global society (most if its beneficiaries are card-carrying Democrats by the way including Bezos).

In a recent (October 2020) survey of US billionaires by Forbes, 43% identified as Republicans, 24% as Democrats and 33% as independents. Or to put it more succinctly, bollocks.

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Bungle_52 replied to MattieKempy | 2 years ago
1 like

Closed my amazon account a couple of weeks ago. I won't be using them again.

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Boopop | 2 years ago
3 likes

...or spend your money elsewhere with a business that doesn't treat their workforce like disposable drones which are tossed out when they've been worked to the bone.

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AlsoSomniloquism replied to Boopop | 2 years ago
6 likes

Where do you draw the line? 95% of mainstream bikes and cycling gear are made in factories in the far east where people are paid pittances and safety is a word that adds extra costs if implemented. Probably most of the electronics are similar judging by the suicides at the chip manuafacturing plants of Apple devices. 

Even if you go with a UK bike builder, where did the steel/ alu tubing and other parts come from? What were the factory conditions like?

Avatar
brooksby replied to AlsoSomniloquism | 2 years ago
1 like

Let's be honest, here: those factories in the far east where the computers or smartphones we're reading this site on, or where this site itself is hosted, are not exactly fair trade, are they?

Avatar
Doctor Fegg replied to brooksby | 2 years ago
2 likes

road.cc is hosted with the excellent Hetzner in Germany, who I presume pay a living wage to their staff and all the other entitlements of German employment law.

Avatar
brooksby replied to Doctor Fegg | 2 years ago
1 like
Doctor Fegg wrote:

road.cc is hosted with the excellent Hetzner in Germany, who I presume pay a living wage to their staff and all the other entitlements of German employment law.

OK, then I stand corrected on that point.  But I was talking more about the people who actually manufacture all our tech...

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a_to_the_j replied to Doctor Fegg | 2 years ago
1 like

using servers and components built/made in the far east factories .... unfortunatley anything eletronic ends up being drawn back there, otherwise they would cost an absolute fortune - you cannot get your 1TB SD hard drive for 50quid delivered without suffering pain somewhere along the supply chain - if we all want ethical products both in terms of the environment and the people who make them, be prepared to pay a whole lot more....

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OnYerBike replied to AlsoSomniloquism | 2 years ago
4 likes

I think there's an element of "don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good" here. If you can get exactly the same product for a reasonable price from an end supplier that doesn't treat its warehouse staff quite so poorly, surely that's a good thing no matter how much suffering has already gone into manufacturing the item itself?

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