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Canyon quietly launches new RING bar end bell

Canyon's new dinger doesn't require tools to fit, can be mounted on any drop handlebar and promises over 85 decibels of ringing to alert others of your presence

With most Canyon-related headlines recently focussing on worn out seatposts and broken handlebars, in amongst all the drama the German brand has launched a discreet bar end bell that promises over 85 decibels from its brass alloy body and wire mechanism. 

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Canyon ring bar end bell 3

Canyon says the RING bar end bell integrates into all drop handlebars with no tools required, and a fixed bell body means the maximum ding ding possible is always achieved. Secured by your handlebar tape, the wire mechanism sits just under your drop for an ergonomic ringing position. 

Canyon ring bar end bell 5.PNG

Canyon lists the highlights as being the tool-free installation, universal fitting and a strong wire/hammer that reaches that promised 85 decibels plus when it hits the "special brass alloy body". Weight weenies need not worry with the bell weighing just 40g, and Canyon notes that it can only be installed on the left side if used with a bike that has a Di2 E-Tube junction box on the right bar end.  

Canyon ring bar end bell 1

As far as we know, there aren't any other established brands making bells that mount on road bike bar ends. The only example we can find online is the Vavert Incredibell, that is currently out of stock on Amazon UK.

The Canyon RING costs £20.95, and is available to buy on Canyon's UK website now. 

Arriving at road.cc in 2017 via 220 Triathlon Magazine, Jack dipped his toe in most jobs on the site and over at eBikeTips before being named the new editor of road.cc in 2020, much to his surprise. His cycling life began during his students days, when he cobbled together a few hundred quid off the back of a hard winter selling hats (long story) and bought his first road bike - a Trek 1.1 that was quickly relegated to winter steed, before it was sadly pinched a few years later. Creatively replacing it with a Trek 1.2, Jack mostly rides this bike around local cycle paths nowadays, but when he wants to get the racer out and be competitive his preferred events are time trials, sportives, triathlons and pogo sticking - the latter being another long story.  

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13 comments

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mbprouser | 2 years ago
1 like

What's wrong with shouting 'get the hell out of my way jackass!'  1

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hawkinspeter replied to mbprouser | 2 years ago
1 like

I've got a tiny bell fitted to my stem, but most of the time it's easier to either use my voice ("Can I get past, please?") or alternatively my squealing disc brakes.

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marvelousm | 2 years ago
0 likes

Great idea, I start and finish most of my rides accross a park on a mixed pedestrian and cyle path.  I started using a bell on my bike a couple of years ago and have been thanked many times by walkers for letting them know I am coming up behind them.  However a bell looks quite incongruous on a drophadlebar bike and this is a great solution.  It was not yet showing on Canyon's web site when I looked.

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Kendalred replied to marvelousm | 2 years ago
1 like

They are on there now - I was just ordering one, when I saw that the P&P was £10! Sod that - I'm not paying nearly 50% of the cost of the product for p&p, especially something that claims to weight just 40g!

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Bigfoz | 2 years ago
4 likes

Both a good and bad idea. Nice compact bell. Kind of a neat place to put it. BUT. In any situation where you need a bell, you also usually need brakes. and this is about as far as you can get away from them. Even with adult male hands I;m not convnced I can safely operate the brake and at the same time a bell on the opposite end of the reach...

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Jules59 replied to Bigfoz | 2 years ago
3 likes

I think using the brakes and this bell simultaneously would be very difficult. When braking hard I couldnt change my hand position without risk of loosing control.
Its no good for me anyway as the bar ends are where my Sprintech mirrors are located.
In my opinion bells are generally for warning of your approach before you need to brake; especially when closing on pedestrians from behind - giving them time to assess the situation and react accordingly.

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mdavidford replied to Jules59 | 2 years ago
1 like

Aren't you kind of arguing against yourself there? If the bell should be used in advance of when you need to brake, why does it matter if you can't use the bell and brake simultaneously?

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Dicklexic replied to Jules59 | 2 years ago
1 like
Jules59 wrote:

In my opinion bells are generally for warning of your approach before you need to brake; especially when closing on pedestrians from behind - giving them time to assess the situation and react accordingly.

THIS ^^^^^

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RobD replied to Bigfoz | 2 years ago
2 likes

Do you not have brake leavers on both sides of your handlebars? I haven't taken the plunge to go 1x on brakes as well as drivetrain...

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huntswheelers | 2 years ago
2 likes

is that for MVDP to signal his aero bars have broken again....lol

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cyclisto | 2 years ago
1 like

Drop bars bell, so simple, yet practically missing from the market.

It would probably have a position on my bars, if there weren't installed already barend lights (also very usefull!)

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ChrisB200SX replied to cyclisto | 2 years ago
0 likes

Aero rechargeable red bar-end lights would be an easy sell to me.

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Sriracha | 2 years ago
5 likes

Nice, a bell end (as hinted yet deftly avoided in the title). But will it make you go like the clappers?

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