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Spec me a rim brake wheelset

Pretty sure I want 28mm tubeless tires, spending up to £1k. For the money there are a few cheaper brands doing 21mm internal 28mm external (eg Light Bicycle, Venn), or I could get a premium brand 2nd hand (eg Campag, Zipp) they seem to stop at 19mm internal, 27mm external. Looking to balance comfort / weight / quality/ aero accepting it will be <105%. Thanks!

If you're new please join in and if you have questions pop them below and the forum regulars will answer as best we can.

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11 comments

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leedorney | 1 week ago
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I now use some fulcrum night something's or whatever but there ultra light 1500grm even with a cassette & tyres, I also use some 3t wheels really wide on the rim about 1700grm all up weight! Alu too. I've some no name carbon 38mm wheels about 1600grm all up (tyres + cassette). Lastly I've some Alex alu wheels & they're fast very fast but narrow one the rim ;/ - I own 3x pair of wheels now as back in the day wheels would go out every ride then I started glueing the nipple spoke interface and thats where they'd loosen, so I have a few wheels as a backup

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hmjb | 1 month ago
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The chaps at J.Laverack build beautiful wheels under their component brand - https://www.rideaera.com/

I think they use Lightbicycle rims, and you can specify hubs. I went with Chris King, but I'm hearing rave reviews on the Hope Pro5s.

You could also just buy direct from LightBicycle - I believe they offer Bitex, Carbon-Ti, DT Swiss and Novatec hubs. 

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JMark replied to hmjb | 1 month ago
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Thank you, looking at the LB website, they have what I want, wide rims at a good price so likely what I'll get, complete wheels from them.

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check12 | 1 month ago
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pandapodium 

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matthewn5 | 1 month ago
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Get David at DCR to build you some lovely performance wheels. And he can re-rim them once they need it, unlike any throwaway mass-produced wheels, for which you can rarely find (or afford) replacements.

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bobbinogs | 1 month ago
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Why not just contact a decent wheelsmith who will take your requirements, factor in the type of riding you do and the budget, and then spec/build you exactly what you want?  Personally, I can recommend Wheelsmith, but have also used DCR.  Both produce great wheels but I have found DCR to be hard work when it comes to comms/engagement.

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JMark replied to bobbinogs | 1 month ago
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Thank you, likely what I'll do for my next commuting wheelset. This is for my light use fast bike so more about performance than build quality.

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Simon E replied to JMark | 1 month ago
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I have just acquired my first ever set of handbuilt wheels via my LBS - 28 spoke Open Pro C with Miche Primato QR hubs, the wheelbuilder's own preference. 1740g (w/o QR) for about £300, all parts off-the-shelf and simple to service.

I didn't see the point of spending lots more money to save 100-200g and the parts wear out faster (though I'd still love to try some really lightweight carbon wheels, just to see what the fuss is about).

Hope you get something you enjoy riding.

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David9694 replied to Simon E | 1 month ago
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That's the kind of conservative choices I make for my home wheelbuilding, so it's good to hear pros doing this.  Some are quite disparaging about Open Pro. 

I stick with what's affordable, is on the spoke calculator and available - particularly if I want a higher spoke count on the rear. E.g. Lots of hype about Pacenti Brevet, but hard to find any stocks.  I've liked the H+Son rims I've used. 

I don't know if there are many hubs these days where the drillings aren't all bi-directional. There are a fair few rims where the holes are left-right specific, or the whole lot is offset for rear wheels. That's all more stuff to go wrong in my simple book.  Online descriptions can be pretty vague.

I use Sapim Race (couldn't get hold of the triple butted model in the length in black I wanted for my next build) and Sapim Strong for the rear drive side. I like the Primatos, something a bit different to Shimano, with a pleasing red anodised QR lever. 

One deep section DT Swiss pair I did early on do make a really noticeable difference - making a slow bike faster and a fast bike a tricky ride.
 

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Simon E replied to David9694 | 1 month ago
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David9694 wrote:

I stick with what's affordable, is on the spoke calculator and available - particularly if I want a higher spoke count on the rear. E.g. Lots of hype about Pacenti Brevet, but hard to find any stocks.  I've liked the H+Son rims I've used.

I give more credence to the voices of people that build (Ugo.Santalucia and Cycle Clinic used to post extensively on Bikeradar forums, for example). Pacenti copped some grief at one stage for the poor QC on their 23mm rims. The latest Open Pro (2019-on?) is supposedly an improvement on the original. Kinlin rims are widely used and are often rebadged for other brands.

The shop mechanics didn't have any time for wheels like Aksiums, especially if the bike is ridden in the wet. I suspect they would say the same about Fulcrum as lots of people used to complain about the poor bearing seals.

A low spoke count does not usually make for a good, long-lasting wheelset and the weight saved by doing so is pretty small, something like 5-7g per spoke. Having said that, I've ridden inexpensive Shimano wheels for years - RS10, RS010 etc with 16/20 spokes - which have mostly been great but I was told I could treat myself to something a bit more interesting as a birthday gift.

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leedorney replied to Simon E | 1 week ago
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I recall good memories on some R500's, bit flexy but tightened the spokes & 👌

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